Tannery Brook’s Forgotten History March 3 Saturday at The Lace Mill

 Emily Vail and Jiamin Chen will show “Fragmented & Forgotten: Tracing the Tannery Brook” in The Lace Mill’s East Gallery at 165 Cornell Street, Kingston, NY. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, March 3 from 5-8 PM, as part of Kingston’s First Saturday gallery openings. The exhibit will be on display March 3 through March 25. Original maps of the Tannery Brook, paired with historic maps, images, and text, will visualize changes in and around the stream over time.

The Tannery Brook is a small stream in Kingston. The brook flows out of the Twin Ponds, travels downhill along Linderman Avenue, crosses under Washington Avenue, skirts property lines between Washington Avenue and Green Street, and then vanishes beneath the parking lot behind the Ulster County Family Court building. It makes the rest of its journey underground, in a pipe, until it meets the Esopus Creek behind Kingston Plaza.

Although the Tannery Brook has worked hard for Kingston over the centuries – including powering mills, irrigating crops, and carrying away waste – it has been increasingly fragmented and forgotten. It hasn’t been forgotten by everyone, though; it continues to make its presence known through flooding, infrastructure failure, and other damage.

The Tannery Brook is a microcosm of the ways that we perceive and manage water in cities. Its history and present state can provide context for modern stream and urban water management, as we ask: What should we expect from a stream with such a long history of use? How can this history relate to future restoration projects?

With these questions in mind, Emily Vail and Jiamin Chen trace the Tannery Brook’s history from colonial settlement in the 1650s through today using historic maps, historic images, local history narratives, newspaper articles, and other original documents.

About Emily Vail:

Emily Vail is a graduate student at Cornell University in the field of Natural Resources. Since 2010, Emily has worked at the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation’s Hudson River Estuary Program , in collaboration with the NYS Water Resources Institute at Cornell University . She supports community-based watershed groups, municipalities, and other partners as they work to improve water quality in the Hudson Valley. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies from Vassar College . Emily also organizes Uptown Swing Kingston, a monthly night of hot jazz, dance, and swing, and directs the Uptown Lowdown vintage jazz dance troupe.

 

About Jiamin Chen:

Jiamin Chen is a graduate landscape architecture student from Cornell University . Originally from Vancouver, Canada, she has a bachelor’s degree in environmental design from the University of British Columbia . She worked as a landscape designer on various municipal and governmental projects across many parts of Asia including China, Malaysia, Qatar and Myanmar. She returned to graduate school in pursuit of professional licensure, and her work as a graduate research assistant has taken her to various parts of upstate New York and this year, to Kingston. In her spare time, she is a passionate botanical artist, a houseplant collector and an avid traveler.

This work is supported by the NYS Water Resources Institute at Cornell University and the Hudson River Estuary Program of the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation , with support from the NYS Environmental Protection Fund .

For more information, contact Emily Vail at eev22@cornell.edu .

ABOUT THE LACE MILL : A community block party in August 2016 celebrated the opening of 55 apartments of affordable living preferenced for artists, officially anchoring the City of Kingston’s artistic community at the north end of Cornell Street. In addition to residential space, The Lace Mill shares 8,000 square feet of public gallery space as cultural activity centers open to its residents, local community and visiting public audiences. The Lace Mill has received six prestigious awards for design and historic preservation including Preservation Action’s “Best of 2016” and NYSERDA’s Trailblazer Award for housing the City’s largest solar array (160Kw). Built in 1903, The US Lace Curtain Mill boasted a long history as a major 20th-century employer and fine lace fabricator. RUPCO purchased the vacant shell, boarded up for the better part of three decades, in December 2013, setting in motion adaptive reuse of the historic building with a vision for creative placemaking. For more information, visit www.thelacemill.com .

ABOUT RUPCO : RUPCO, affordable housing advocate and innovative community developer in the Hudson Valley, is a charter member of NeighborWorks America, a national network of 245 housing and community development change agents. RUPCO affects the lives of over 8,000 people through its work with homelessness, rental assistance, foreclosure prevention, first-time homebuyers, home rehabilitation, energy efficiency and real estate development. RUPCO connects nearly 2000 families, over 800 landlords and rental assistance through the NYS Home and Community Renewal and Housing Choice Voucher Program. RUPCO currently owns/manages 16 properties with 411 apartments providing homes to over 560 people. The majority of those residents represent our community’s most vulnerable populations: the elderly, seniors, disabled and working class families. RUPCO is also improving local communities through estate development in the Hudson Valley including The Metro, Energy Square, Landmark Place (all in Kingston) and Newburgh’s Historic East End. For more information, visit www.rupco.org.

 

Hope Through Activism: Lanette Hughes Inspires Through Artwork

Standing outside The Lace Mill, wearing over-sized black sunglasses, talking to a neighbor, Lanette Hughes appears nondescript. A cordial, “Hi, how are you?” to a stranger, she resumes her conversation. You would never guess she churned her tragedy into art in a profound way. A first-hand experience with domestic violence, her identity stolen and her savings robbed from her, these life-lesson setbacks made her willpower stronger. Lanette Hughes is not only a survivor, but a thriver — and her artwork embodies her understated vigor.

Hughe’s parents introduced her to situations at an early age that called for toughening up. They lived in Europe withinin target sites of WWII battle and concentration camp zones. While transitioning between countries, she found it difficult to reconcile that she had friends from opposing countries post-wartime. Her parent’s trip to Dachau further fragmented her sense of peace. The air-raid rubble and abandoned buildings that littered some streets haunted her as a child, a terror still raw when she thinks back.

Recently, Hughes channeled that experience into her artwork, “Human Beings are Not Created for Target Practice.” The large canvas oil painting highlights military personnel . If stripped of their uniforms, would they have reason to shoot the enemy? Hughes bears no bias towards “good” and “bad” sides where nationalism incurs.

She is, however, partial to beautiful art. While living in Germany, Hughes remembers trekking down to monasteries and playing nearby. One day while climbing a wall enclosure surrounding St. Michaelsberg, she fell and hurt herself. Monks brought her in, and she was introduced to wondrous sculpture and paintings within. Inspired, she asked her parents to hire a governess educate her in classical art training and illumination found in religious texts.

Being a sensitive artist and a newcomer whenever her parents moved, she stood out from the crowd. Coming to the United States, she was sorely misunderstood for her European values and mannerisms. She was often bullied and put down, and over time, these experiences impacted her artwork.

She was a target again a few years back, after she returned from a trip to Florida to find her identity stolen. Her home, savings, and future fell through her hands. Hughes became homeless, living out of her car, where she slept and traveled for weeks in Woodstock. She refused to give up her dog when Social Services prompted her to do so, so she could receive a no-pets hotel room. Deprived of everything else, she wasn’t relinquishing her four-footed companion.

Hughes kept her spirits up and applied to housing assistance programs in the local area that would allow dogs. At the time, RUPCO was accepting applications for The Lace Mill for artists. She applied to the lottery  and the patterns of the universe aligned with her needs. “In the miracle of miracles, I got RUPCO housing. And I love it here—every day I thank my creator for this fabulous place and all the friends I have made.”

Hughes realizes that others don’t have it as good. At her last exhibition, held at The Lace Mill in October 2017, Hughes combined her activism with her art show, and made a stand for something larger than making money. She created 50 pieces for sale, where 75% of proceeds benefited local charities. One of her paintings benefited the Haitian People’s Project to provide meals for afflicted families. Consistently without food, Haitian parents often feed their children “mud cakes.” These look like pies, but made of mud, and eating them causes malnutrition and infection. Hughes wants to help in her way, through her art and social activism.

Hughes is proud to live in an apartment where she knows her efforts are supported. She’s made many connections to Kingston nonprofits and continues to support human rights in the way she knows best. Her influence has already been felt among the community; one man started to cry when he saw one of her paintings regarding domestic violence. “’This happened to me, and I’ve never told anybody,’” Hughes recalls. “It really touched him. He didn’t say whether it happened to him, his mother, wife or girlfriend, but it happened to him somehow.”

Her paintings possess an understated emotional impact. She doesn’t wish people to turn aghast, but she wants her visual to resonate with them. She wants people to know that there is awareness, that others have been through similar situations, and the often misunderstood pain — maybe portrayed as endless swirls or spirals in her abstract work — is normal and valid. She connects to her audience on a personal level. “I don’t like the word authentic, but I try to be sincere about who I am. I’ve been through things and I try to relate that to other people.”

Maybe malnutrition, abuse, or trauma has robbed a person of identity, and they use public facades to hide the pain. By recognizing themselves in her work, a part of them is resurrected and recognized. Maybe it will take years to fix, with in-between years of denial. But something clicked, and that is what activism is all about.

Hughes has changed her perspective on earning a living and being an artist. “I don’t need as much as I thought I needed to make me happy. I’m happy with or without. But the fact that I can paint whatever I want is an incredible blessing. And because I live here, I can do that.”

Black History Month Kingston 2018

Calendar of events for Black History Month Kingston February 1-28, 2018 The newly formed A.J. Williams-Myers African Roots Library, located in Kingston’s Ponckhockie area, kicks off its first community-wide celebration of Black History. The combination of events and activities, include history, song, dance, drama and reenactments citywide. Black History Month Kingston 2018 pays tribute to the legacy and contributions of African-Americans in Kingston and the surrounding areas. Art exhibits, performances, spoken word, and dance are happening throughout February:

February 3:  Black History Month Kingston kick-off, 1-5pm, The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston, Free:
– Bluu Motion Exhibit by Frank Waters: An interactive exhibit showcasing a variety of animated movies, series, music videos and stills using a machinima concept
– The Poetry Corner: Youth are reciting a variety of poems from 
black poets from the 1800’s-1900’s
– Special African dance performance
Center for Creative Education Energy Dance Company

February 3:  Black History Today: Silence is Not an Option, 6-8pm, African Roots Library, 43 Gill Street, Kingston, Free

February 7: Comedy Slam, 6-9pm, Kingston Artist Collective, 63 Broadway, Kingston, suggested donation $5

February 14: Ruby Mae Sweetheart Love & Soul Night, 7-10pm, 331 Hasbrouck Avenue, Kingston, Food priced off the menu

February 18:  MyKingstonKids Puzzle Party, 1-4pm, The Library at the A.J. Williams-Myers African Roots Center, 43 Gill Street, Kingston, Free

February 23: Ruby Mae Sweetheart Love & Soul Night, 7-10pm, 331 Hasbrouck Avenue, Kingston, Food priced off the menu

February  24:  First-person re-enactment of Sojourner Truth, 1-4pm, The Sanctuary of The Old Dutch Reformed Church, 272 Wall Street, Kingston, Free. Historic interpreter Deborah Zull of Saugerties will present Sojourner’s famous “Ain’t I A Woman?”  speech and conduct an interview of Sojourner by James Bartholomew “Jimmy” Olsen, a fictional reporter. Sojourner is one of Kingston’s most famous women, and most famous person of color, and in celebration of Black History Month, RUPCO brings this history moment to life.

February 24: Black History Month Kingston Gala, 7-11pm, Arts Society of Kingston, 97 Broadway, Kingston, Tickets on sale now. The celebration introduces the first Ben Wigfall Legacy Award to his family and the first community recipient, Tay Fisher of Kingston.

February 25: Giving Life-from Survival to LGBTQ, Black Excellence, 3-5pm, HVLGBTQ Center, 300 Wall Street, Kingston, Free

February 28:  Closing event, 6-9pm, Broadway Arts, 694 Broadway, Kingston, Free

February 24: African drumming with Amabou Diallo, 10-30am-12:30pm, Kingston City Library, 55 Franklin Street, Kingston, Free

In addition to the month-long off-site events, schools are invited to visit the Black History Month Kingston exhibits in The Lace Mill’s three galleries. Students will have a chance to engage creatively in many different platforms showcasing African-American history and culture. The goal is to make African-American history a source of pride and awareness for everyone.

For more information, visit Black History Month Kingston.

From Homeless to Housed: Leslie Mann’s Story of Growth

Leslie Mann wakes up with a fridge and cupboard full of food, a roof over her head, amenities for daily living, and the man of the house, Mutai, a 10lb terrier who licks her incessantly. The sun shines through her tall windows, dog figurines line the window sills, garden beds fill the view outside her front door. Book-stuffed shelves with her favorite literature are within reach from her wheelchair. Hers is a place to call home.

But attaining a handicap-friendly, affordable home wasn’t easy to grasp.

Mann grew up in NYC and lived with her parents while a young adult. Childhood was emotionally difficult for her. She didn’t fit in with groups at school and her interests in western-cowboy history and poetry didn’t align with other childrens’ fancies. Later, she earned a living as a factory worker and a filing clerk until her family moved and her brother went to college.

Mann struggled and eventually became homeless after her NYC apartment burned down. For a while, she lived on the streets, seeking shelter in abandoned buildings and eating what she could find in garbage cans. Her housing instability prevented her from owning a dog, but she found ways to relocate stray dogs in the City, asking around who would take care of a rescue cared for on pauper’s salary.

She found solace in good deeds. One day, she overheard a young couple at odds with each other, when the young man raged and grabbed his dog by the neck. Mann swiftly intervened and took the dog away, but not without struggle. He acted on impulse, threatening Mann with a knife. On-foot patrol officers quickly intervened and no one was hurt. Now, her eyes shine when she thinks back to the memory. She saved a dog’s life risking her own.

People took notice of her acts. They wanted to help her the way she was saving dogs’ lives. Regular goers to the dog park saved money to help her move into her first upstate apartment— she settled first in Woodstock, then Lake Katrine in a Motel 19. Lake Katrine suited her needs. For a while she walked everywhere, finding comfort in familiar habits, and eventually she applied to live at The Stuyvesant, supportive housing for seniors in Kingston, NY, owned and operated by RUPCO.

The Stuyvesant offered neighbors in nearby apartments who shared similar interests, a pet-friendly policy, and the flight of stairs that hindered her mobility. When RUPCO completed the Woodstock Commons in 2013, Mann transferred to a ground floor apartment. Of course, she kept Mutai, now 14 years old.

Independent Living has deepened and widened her personal growth. On spring and summer days, the surrounding outdoors are “wonderful and unbeatable.” She finds pleasure in taking care of her canine companion, ensuring he lives the life of a pampered pup. Meals on Wheels delivers food to her every week. Her healthcare is in place. When she isn’t listening to audio books or watching movies, she brainstorms ideas for a book about a man dedicated to his dog; a quasi-reversal of dog loyalty to humans, a testament to her life’s work.

She isn’t finished making a difference. There’s always more dogs to rescue, more activism to spark. With her sense of Home established and her accessibility needs met in a supportive housing community, Leslie’s starting a new chapter in her quest for goodwill.

 

 

Videographer-Monastic Student-Artist Blessing in Home, Continues on Path Towards Success
Lace Mill resident-artist James Martin with his watercolor artworkBefore moving to The Lace Mill in February 2016, James Martin lived in a Bearsville Christian monastery. To pay his rent now, he makes a living as a teacher’s assistant, hall monitor, custodian, and substitute teacher at Onteora School.
 
This wasn’t the way he wanted to lead his life, though. If he had the choice, he’d swap a monastic life for an artistic one—and gain a following that afforded notoriety. For now, though, he works in his studio and shows his work in The Lace Mill’s galleries, offering a bit of himself to the world in preparation for when luck strikes.
 
Getting a Lace Mill apartment  wasn’t just a stroke of good luck for Martin. Back in 2014, a friend suggested he apply to The Lace Mill, 55 apartments preferenced for artists. On the first day of the application lottery, a snowstorm wracked Kingston. Despite the transportation threat, Martin arrived at the RUPCO office, application in hand, and was greeted by a secretary, incredulous of his arrival. “Wow, you’re the first to hand in the application—nobody’s come out in this weather,” she marveled. Perseverance, luck, Divine intervention — this mixture lent him an opportunity to acquire an apartment; during the second lottery wave, he got called. “To have a place like RUPCO is a blessing, no doubt about it,” Martin says.
 
The Lace Mill is a perfect for his artistic needs. An ongoing student in the arts, Martin finds it fitting to live in a cozy studio space where he creates. He studied at Hunter College and Brooklyn College, where he completed a double major in fine arts and film. Martin wrote and directed several low-budget films, which did particularly well in the 80’s, like “I Was a Teenage Zombie.” However, with all the hubbub of the theater district, something surfaced and shifted his videography flow.
 
He had a new calling. God asked he put down the camera to center his thoughts on religion; Martin listened. He pursued monastic life and spent several years in more meditative spaces. Curious to link religion and his art background, he dabbled in iconography, but was disappointed with the art form’s limitations. Martin says, “It’s an exact art, and there’s no room for individuality, and that’s not how I was trained.” After several years of full-time religious service, he moved out and started odd jobs around the area.
 
3 pen&ink by James MartinNow, at The Lace Mill, he longs to be a full-time artist like the larger-than-life masters, George Bellows and Edward Hopper. These men have style, a type of luring expression he wishes to produce in his own work. In Hopper’s paintings, buildings or objects that are part of the everyday environment, like the restaurant in “Nighthawk,” convey simple images but relay meaningful messages. Their works are like mini worlds to get lost in, like a story, and Martin’s videographer-self appreciates the artist’s flair for summoning The Divine.
 
Martin refers to commonplace pictures and wisdom for inspiration and direction. He learned from monastic life to take things day-by-day, to not plan every detail of the future. Life is constantly in flux, especially living on modest means. Even though he considers himself a “starving artist,” and relies on other jobs for sustenance, he knows he will get somewhere, someday. “I’ve always had confidence in what I do, but it wasn’t always easy to succeed.” Making a name in the arts world is a lifetime aspiration, and earning a living as a full time artist is the ultimate achievement. Livelihood based on profits from artistic projects alone is “going to be hard. There’s going to be times when that work isn’t there, but if I keep at it, it will all work out. Don’t ask me how, it’s a mystery.” He experiments in watercolor, pen-ink, and charcoal pencil. And in 2017, he found a calling for coordinating collaborative artist shows like “13 Misfits” and ArtWalk .
 
His studio space is the world that is safe to get lost in, his home a place where he creates that “wow” piece that art connoisseurs will fawn over. His artistic enlightenment, Godsent, will come to him here at The Lace Mill. He just has to listen to that still small voice.
Woodstock Commons Live-In Superintendent

The Superintendent reports directly to our Maintenance Supervisor, and is responsible for managing the day-to-day maintenance of the intergenerational affordable housing development known as Woodstock Commons located in Woodstock, New York. The Superintendent plays a key role in protecting, cleaning and maintaining the campus’ buildings and ensuring tenant safety and comfort. For many tenants, the Superintendent is RUPCO’s most visible representative. The Superintendent apartment is a roomy 2-bedroom apartment; the position includes  access to a company truck for work-related tasks. This is a full-time, 35+-hour/week, live-in position with duties which may include, but are not limited to.

Position Responsibilities: Conduct daily cleaning duties both inside and outside around the entire Woodstock Commons campus. Tasks ensure:

  • common areas are clean and in good repair; emergency exits and fixtures are in working order; snow, garbage, and recycling is removed from designated areas; elevators, lobbies, walls, and windows are clean; and floors are maintained (i.e. swept, mopped, buffed, vacuumed, and cleaned)
  • Conduct emergency repairs or services as needed.  
  • Manage and monitor grounds to ensure that they are properly and safely maintained. Conduct a walking tour around the campus on a regular basis (daily/weekly) to monitor aesthetics of tenant areas and common spaces. 
  • Maintain grounds. This includes: snow removal, plowing, clearing snow and ice from sidewalks and driveways; overall landscaping, picking up trash, cutting grass, raking leaves and tending gardens, weeding, planting, etc.
  • Perform a wide variety of general maintenance tasks such as small areas of drywall repair, painting, appliance repair/replacement, diagnose mechanical, plumbing, electrical problems and make repairs.
  • Liaison and manage vendor relations on various projects needed for work to be done outside of the scope of Superintendent’s ability.
  • Manage work order system to accomplish maintenance tasks. Accurate and timely completion of applicable reports (i.e. work orders, incident reports, etc.) Maintain maintenance files as required
  • Serve as first responder to emergency calls from tenants and alarm company
  • Maintain compliance with all federal, state and local regulations and other mandated guidelines and policies relevant to property management and operations including safety and quality assurance
  • Provide on-call, after-hours, and/or weekend duties as assigned

Required Knowledge, Skills, Education and Experience:  

  • Knowledge of maintenance operations in physical plant; ability to diagnose mechanical, plumbing, electrical problems and make repairs; ability to maintain a detailed record-keeping system and prepare correspondence relating to reports and inquiries
  • Experience with operating truck snow plow and landscape equipment helpful
  • Effective communication & interpersonal skills
  • Ability to work with diverse groups and to maintain harmonious relationships with supervisors, peers, subordinates and tenants
  • Be honest and have strong moral principles
  • Demonstrate good judgment
  • Physical condition that will permit activities including, but not limited to, heavy lifting (must be able to lift at least 50 pounds), bending, walking, climbing, pushing, stooping, and working under adverse temperatures and/or weather conditions
  • Ability to organize, work independently, delegate, and negotiate and problem solve
  • Must be caring and compassionate, but at the same time able to establish a strong presence to enforce policies related to the safety and security of the residence community
  • Have knowledge of, or willing to learn, EEOC, Fair Housing, OSHA, ADA and other applicable public laws
  • Computer literate
  • High school diploma or equivalent required
  • A minimum of 5 years hands-on maintenance or related experience
  • Ability to communicate effectively in English both orally and in writing
  • Must have valid driver’s license

Benefits:

  • 2-bedroom apartment
  • Hourly pay for 35-hour work week (with possibility of occasional additional, overtime hours)
  • Vacation, Sick, Personal time off plus holidays
  • Medical, dental and vision insurance available
  • 403b Retirement Savings with employer match
  • Use of company truck for work-related duties

To Apply:
RUPCO welcomes and encourages diversity in its workforce and all individuals are encouraged to apply. RUPCO is an equal opportunity employer (EOE). Please submit cover letter including salary requirement and resume by January 19, 2018 to:
RUPCO, Inc.
289 Fair Street
Kingston NY 12401
jobs@rupco.org 

HCV Program Specialist

Red Bubble Man holding a Hire Me SignRUPCO is hiring a Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Specialist  (long-term) to work collaboratively  with program clients and other HCV Specialists in the Kingston office to administer the HCV Program (Section 8).  This full-time position performs a variety of duties such as:

Position Responsibilities:

  • Manage a caseload comprised of households who may be elderly, disabled, handicapped or families with children
  • Interviewing potential candidates for program and articulating the program requirements
  • Determining a family’ eligibility for the program
  • Conducting annual and interim recertifications and re-examinations related to income and program eligibility
  • Work with voucher participants to maintain compliance with program rules and guidelines
  • Conduct apartment inspections as assigned or as needed
  • Work collaboratively with landlords
  • Make referrals for program participants when circumstances present themselves that may put the voucher in jeopardy
  • Other duties as assigned

Required Knowledge, Skills, Education and Experience:

  • Enthusiastic and positive attitude
  • Able to work independently but also as part of the team in a fast paced environment
  • Strong organizational skills
  • Strong computer and math skills
  • Attention to detail
  • Excellent communication skills: written and oral
  • Experience in a customer service environment
  • Tolerance and sensitivity to a diverse population
  • Strong work ethic

To Apply:
RUPCO welcomes and encourages diversity in its workforce and all individuals are encouraged to apply. RUPCO is an equal opportunity employer (EOE). Applications are accepted on a rolling basis and will continue until the position is filled. Please submit cover letter including salary requirement and resume to:
RUPCO, Inc.
289 Fair Street
Kingston NY 12401
jobs@rupco.org 

Newburgh East End Apartments Accepting Rental Applications

Newburgh East End rental logoThe first series of apartments are coming online February 1 in Newburgh’s historic East End. Be the first to live in these newly renovated rentals in a five-block radius just off Broadway on Lander, First, South Miller, Dubois and Johnson. We’re bring 44 apartments to life and Safe Harbors is managing the resident end on our behalf. 

Complete your application through Safe Harbors of the Hudson’s website here or  call (845) 562-6940 ext. 141 for more information. You can also stop by their offices at  111 Broadway, Newburgh and fill out the paper application right there.  Apartments include a space for every sized household:
•  (1) studio apartment
•  (25) 1-bedroom apartments
•  (9) 2-bedroom apartments
•  (9) 3-bedroom apartments

Amenities include:
• Community room
• On-site laundry facility
• Police substation
• Each property is a smoke-free community
• No pets accepted

Income eligibility and certain preferences apply to most apartments. But you won’t know unless you apply today.

Real Estate Development Project Manager

POsition open in Property ManagementRUPCO is seeking a highly motivated Real Estate Development Project Manager with 3 to 5 years of experience to process existing development pursuits and assist with new target opportunities. He/she will leverage their skills and experience in affordable housing best practices to take a significant leadership role in the creation of new housing for RUPCO’s growing portfolio.

Candidates must have experience and be technically proficient in aspects of affordable housing real estate development, including finance, grant writing, entitlement, design, construction, lease-up and operations.

Overview of Duties:
• Identifying acquisition opportunities, including evaluating over-all project feasibility
• Researching, preparing and submitting funding and grant applications
• Securing acquisition, predevelopment, construction and permanent financing
• Oversee the negotiation of major agreements and financing documents, including limited partnership agreements, loan documents, construction contracts, architectural agreements, and property management agreements
• Develop and underwrite pro forms, budget and project narratives, based on targeted audience, real estate development matrix, local need and other functions as needed
• Coordinate with architect, engineer, landscape architects, interior designers, property owners, project managers, and other team members
• Negotiate and draft contract terms and scope with design consultants and contractors
• Manage project timeline, ensuring milestones are met on time and within budget
• Oversee the construction draw process and develop monthly project reports
• Responsible for managing and executing project contracts in accordance with department and corporate requirements.
• Maintain compliance in all federal, state and local regulations and other mandated guidelines and polices request to Real Estate and Community Development, including safety and quality assurance.
• Manage files, provide reports and perform other administration tasks as needed.

Skills and Experience:
•  A minimum of three years’ experience in community development, municipal governance and or affordable housing or a Bachelor’s Degree in Urban or Community Planning, Business or related field
•  Experience and technically proficient in aspects of affordable housing real estate development, including finance, entitlement, design, construction, lease-up and operations
•  Ability to analyze complex data, perform sophisticated analysis and make appropriate recommendations and decisions
•  Experience with Excel and word processing software. Experience with Project Management software a plus
• Experience in grant writing, entitlement process, public sector funding, public speaking and non-profit organizations
• Excellent communication, team building spirit, interpersonal skills, and conflict resolution skills necessary
• Ability to organize, work independently, delegate, negotiate, and problem solve
• Must have a commitment to the mission of the organization and a passion for providing affordable homes and support services to the area’s most vulnerable populations
• Must have valid driver’s license and reliable transportation
• Full-time position,  generous benefit package,  paid time-off

To Apply:
RUPCO welcomes and encourages diversity in its workforce and all individuals are encouraged to apply. RUPCO is an equal opportunity employer (EOE). Please submit cover letter including salary requirement and resume by January 19, 2018 to:
RUPCO, Inc.
289 Fair Street
Kingston NY 12401
jobs@rupco.org 

Bon-Odori Dance Festival Photo Exhibition 2011-2017 at The Lace Mill

Youko and Kazuma Yamamoto will host a Bon Odori Dance Festival for Peace Photo Exhibition, 2011-2017 at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston, from January 5 to 31. The opening reception is January 6 from 4-7 p.m. in the West Gallery as part of Kingston’s First Saturday. Displayed photos commemorate peace efforts against nuclear war and promote advocacy of nuclear-free energy consumption.

During the month of August, Japanese citizens observe two events: “Genbaku-Kinenbi” and “Obon.” On August 6, Genbaku-Kinenbi is the Atomic Bomb Memorial Day for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki attacks during World War II. From August 13-16, Obon welcomes home ancestors and rekindles family ties.“Bon-Odori” is the dance festival held within small communities during that time.

In 2008, after opening their restaurant Gomen-Kudasai in New Paltz, NY, the Yamamoto’s began protesting the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings with newletters and meetings. They created peaceful energy by putting out lanterns along the street as a form of remembrance, and meditated with like-minded people. After the Fukushima power plant meltdown in 2011, the couple organized a movement that would combine meditative practices and advocacy under one event, the Bon-Odori Dance Festival for Peace. The couple now hosts the annual dance festival in Kingston and coordinates fundraisers to help pay for event equipment, food, drink, and related expenses. The photo exhibitions are free and open to the public; freewill donations benefit the 2018 Bon Odori Dance Festival for Peace.

“I began organizing Bon-Odori Dance Festival to share and heal everyone from the reality of radiation disasters. I believe now is the time to reflect on how nuclear [energy] effects our present and future generations,” says Youko Yamamoto. “We are not content to be victims. We refuse to wait for an immediate fiery end or the slow poisoning of our world. We refuse to sit idly in terror as the so-called great powers take us past nuclear dusk and bring us recklessly close to nuclear midnight. We rise up. We share our stories of survival. We say: humanity and nuclear weapons cannot coexist.”

Guest parking available on South Manor Street and Progress Avenue.

For more information or a private showing, e-mail  Youko Yamamoto or visit BonOdoriKingston on Facebook.