The Metro Hosts Made in Kingston on December 7

Made in Kingston invitationLocal arts businesses, makers, artists, and creators gather Thursday, December 7 for an expo of all things made in Kingston, at a new space under development in Midtown, the city’s up-and-coming arts district. The fifth annual Made In Kingston is co-sponsored by the City of Kingston, Kingston Midtown Arts District, Arts Mid Hudson, Business Alliance of Kingston, and RUPCO. 

This year’s event will be held at The Metro, the former MetLife Hall of Records building, at 2 South Prospect Street (on the corner of Greenkill Avenue, opposite the Boys and Girls Club). RUPCO closed on the 70,000-square-foot underutilized, near-vacant factory/warehouse earlier this year and is donating the space for this special event. RUPCO is proposing The Metro as a film and technology hub to include maker spaces and other creative uses.

“We are thrilled to host Made in Kingston for the second time in one of our buildings,” notes Kevin O’Connor, Chief Operating Officer at RUPCO. “This time, the event foretells what The Metro is all about. In addition to enjoying and purchasing goods from all the makers, we hope this gives attendees the opportunity to see the vision for The Metro, a center for film, TV, technology and makers alike. This building is about the local economy based in creative production with the overarching goal of providing job training and pathways to equity where people make sustainable livings from their creativity. The Metro brings community vitality forward in a space long vacant of any activity or inspiration.”

Made in Kingston opens its doors to the public at 4 p.m. through 8:30 p.m. In addition to more than four dozen local artists, the evening will feature local food, beverages and musical entertainment. For artists’ online registration click here.

“We couldn’t be prouder to support such a homegrown event that continues to expand every year, showcasing the diverse offerings made in Kingston and by ‘Kingstonians’,” said Mayor Steve Noble. “The event has transformed office buildings and warehouses into pop-up boutiques overflowing with locally made products sought after by visitors from throughout the region and beyond. Kingston’s economy is growing stronger every day and it is thanks to the unwavering commitment and investment in our community by our local business owners and entrepreneurs. I look forward to supporting each of them at this exciting event.”

“Over the last few years, we have come to realize just how great the resources are that we have here in Kingston,” added Richard Frumess, a co-founder of the Arts District. “Chief among them is the unique wealth of art manufacturing and crafts industry that is showcased by the annual Made in Kingston event. With our City officials, we are working hard to realize the creative potential the District represents for revitalizing the City.”

For further information, call 845-331-2238 or visit www.madeinkingstonNY.com and www.facebook.com/Made In Kingston

True Storytelling Performance with TMI Project at Lace Mill on November 9

Lace Mill image with description in white lettersEveryone has a “TMI” story (the ones they’ve kept a secret because of fear, shame, or embarrassment) that they’ve always wanted to share, but felt couldn’t or shouldn’t. Lace Mill resident-artists will share with their true, personal perspectives uncovered through their three-month writing experience. Readers share their recent writings based on epiphanies and personal revelations, that “Too Much Information” stuff, stories that will inspire, sadden, madden, and enlighten you.

RUPCO, in partnership with TMI Project, invited residents of the Lace Mill, a residence for artists in Kingston, NY, to participate in a 10-week workshop series led by Eva Tenuto and Sari Botton of TMI Project, during which participants could take time to find the story they most need to tell, feel supported telling it in a safe space, be guided to tell it in a way that ensured they will be heard powerfully, release shame and stigma, clear space for new perspectives, and fully embrace their power. Select participants will perform their true stories crafted during the workshop series for each other, the larger RUPCO community and the general public at this performance. This True Storytelling Performance will be held on Thursday, November 9 at 7 p.m. in The Lace Mill’s West Gallery at 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. 

RUPCO and TMI Project began their partnership in 2016 at Park Heights, a senior housing campus in Rosendale. “TMI Project is thrilled to be working with different RUPCO communities,” said Tenuto, TMI Project’s co-founder and executive director. “After struggling to find housing, it’s nice to not only unpack bags and boxes but also the stories that have been carried along the way. In addition to deepening a sense of community at various residences, we hope this partnership helps participants alleviate some of the lingering burdens of the past and clears the space for a happy, healthy home.”

This event is open to the public. Freewilll donations of $5 (or more) will benefit The Lace Mill Art Council and a future TMI Project workshop. Light refreshments will be provided. Free on-street parking is available on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street.

ABOUT TMI PROJECT: TMI Project is a non-profit organization founded by executive director Eva Tenuto and Julie Novak, which offers memoir writing workshops that culminate in performances and/or publication. Through its Community Outreach Initiative, TMI Project brings distinct versions of its workshops to the incarcerated, at-risk teens, cancer patients, survivors of domestic violence, military veterans, LBGTQ teens, and other populations where people don’t often get to tell their stories or be heard. In its workshops, TMI Project workshop leaders help people write well-crafted true stories from their lives, including the “TMI” or “too much information” part they usually leave out because it’s too painful, shameful, or embarrassing. The workshops typically culminate in Moth-style storytelling shows where participants perform their stories for a live audience.

 

Watercolor Demo at The Lace Mill October 19

The Lace Mill resident-artist community opens its doors to the Mezzanine studio to showcase a watercolor demonstration at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. Thursday, October 19 from 6-7p, Hudson Valley watercolorist and Woodstock School of Art instructor Staats Fasoldt shares his mastery of paints and techniques for both new and accomplished artists.

Staats Fasoldt, watercolorist and instructor at Woodstock School of Art

photo courtesy of Woodstock School of Art

This demonstration is open to the public. Freewill donations are encouraged and will benefit The Lace Mill Arts Council, future exhibits, workshops, and demonstrations. For more information, contact James Martin (347) 387-6874.

Demonstration logistics: The Lace Mill’s front door will be open and a greeter will direct you to the Mezzanine studio. Free on-street parking is available on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street. All are welcome to attend.

O+ Festival Wellness Offerings at The Kirkland October 6-8

“By exchanging the art of medicine for the medicine of art, O+ empowers communities to take control of their collective well-being.” O+ Festival

We’re honored to be a part of O+ Festival again, the eighth year running since O+ hatched this bright idea in 2010. We’re opening the doors to the community and our first-floor Senate Room at The Kirkland, 2 Main Street, Kingston for the weekend’s wellness offerings. Be it yoga or sound baths, meditation or DFX, you’ll want to trade in your sweat bands for an O+ Festivall all-access wristband to experience the mind-body-spirit encounters this weekend, October 6 through 8. For the complete O+ schedule, click here.

Friday, October 6 
7-9p Gentle yoga + sound meditation with Shawn and Susan DeRyder

Saturday, October 7
7-8a Wake Up Yoga with Linda Lalita Winnick
8:30-9:30a Qigong Smile Class with Chris Brandon Whitaker
10-11a Vinyasa Flow with Deb Seche
11:30a-12:30p Finding Balance in a Chaotic World with Christine Agro
1-2p Pure Yang Longevity (Qi Gong) with Charlotte Gibbons
2:30-3:30p Guided Meditation with Shawn Harrison
4-5p The Art of Money with Joanne Leffeld aka Moolah Doula
5:30-6:30p Gentle Yoga and Sacred Napping with Patrice Heber
7-8p Voice Bath with Sarah Perrotta
8:30-10p Kirtan with Radharani Renee Finkelstein

Sunday, October 8
8:30-9:30a DXF (Dance Xross Fitness) with Stacey Nodelman
10-11a Gentle Yoga with Micah
11:30a-12:30p Complete Core Care with Cory Nakasue
1-2p Vintage Jazz Dance with Uptown Swing! with Emily Vail
2:30-3:30p Fusion Dance Technique with Anna Mayta
4-5p Sound Bath with Jessica Caplan
5:30-6:30p Yoga Nidra with Jean L. Wolfersteig

A Bag of Cans

I picked up Janet hitchhiking this morning. The first time, I’d driven past her at 55mph down Route 9W. Thumb out, cigarette dangling from her lip, she stood shivering close to the metal guardrail — it was 46 degrees. She looked like she had slept in the woods – no doubt, she had. 

I drove past thinking, “Where is she going? Wonder what’s her story?” She looked worried, as if she was late for work, or that she wished she had a job to be late to. I found that to be the case. She lost her job, and her apartment, after breaking an ankle. I didn’t ask how, but from the smell of the bag of cans she lugged with her, I envisioned a cadre of circumstances: a miscalculated stride off the curb, stepping into a groundhog hole, or simply not paying attention. I’d done those  myself over a lifetime, some with, and without, the help of a bag of cans.

After a mile, I turned around. I half hoped she’d be there, half-hoped someone else had stopped for her. Flashers blinking, I pulled over gradually, giving the 18-wheeler behind me time to decelerate and pass. I stopped. She opened the door and thanked me. She wondered why I had my flashers on, what was my story: was I running out of gas? Or was I actually stopping to pick her up? She passed in her cooler, a bag of cans, and climbed in. She’d missed her bus by three minutes. Three minutes, she said, she couldn’t catch a break. She thanked me again, and told me I was one of her “Turnaround Girls.”

Trembling, she clutched a makeshift cup from an apple juice can, sharp aluminum edges folded over made for softer sipping. She cradled a second cigarette in icy-bent fingers, blue with cold and chipped nail polish. Ten minutes in the highway-side wind coupled with a night in morning dew-lined tent had frozen her to the bone. She huddled on the passenger side. I cranked the seat heater and blower motor; she defrosted.

In 5 minutes 23 seconds, from roadside to her destination, I got a glimpse of her story. I’d heard parts of this before, from people in need, some homeless, living in the woods, couch-surfing at a friend’s, tent-dwellers and those in-between on their way to permanent housing. They’d been to my office asking for help, help out, help up, any help.

Why the woods I asked? To save money for an apartment, she said, it was the only way to get ahead. But someone stole her pocketbook yesterday with $400 in savings. A friend had found her purse contents, but not before she’d cancelled her bank account; the bank charged her $30 to do so. She was back to zero. Luckily, she bought a tent two days ago; the Catskill cold had set in this week and she needed protection, but still needed a tarp. She’d been out there 10 days. She couldn’t afford a tarp. She cried, reset.

Janet would charge her phone at the convenience store. Her phone, a needed expense was her lifeline to work prospects, a human connection, a promise of another life, a home. Her battery barely holds a charge longer than an hour, she said,  but she’d make it work. She’d recycle the bag of cans she’d collected while walking and spend a dollar on coffee. She’d warm up, cry, recharge, reset.

Her warm clothes stored 30 miles away, her Kingston apartment belongings in limbo; she had no way to get to her stuff, to move them, to store them. She cried through our brief talk about support services, how a system tough to navigate was cruel and offered little help and no hope. She couldn’t access the support she needed. Anger reset her composure. She was not letting this get her down. Her sporadic surveying gig in Tug Hill provided inconsistent income that disqualified her from most services. We talked about 12-step meetings, asking for help, holding onto hope that things will turn around. She thanked me again and closed the door.

I crossed the street to get my car serviced. In the back seat, I found the bag of cans. Shame-filled, I clutched the stale-beer promise of 5-cents-on-redemption. I cringed, wondering what the Service Desk employee thought. Did he think that clanking smelly bag of cans was mine? Disgusted, I wanted to toss the bag of cans, ditch them inside the warm waiting room recycling bin, or maybe stash them out-of-sight outside under a dealership bush. Would this bag of cans really matter to Janet if it weren’t returned? What if it were her clothes bag and phone? I cried inside, reset.

I climbed into the warm shuttle van and asked the driver for two stops. Walking into the convenience store, I found Janet charging her phone, making small talk with another semi-defrosted companion. I gave her a bag of cans. She smiled, thanked me, hugged me. “It’s gonna get better, right?” Yes, I said. And walked out.

In the passenger seat, I cried, reset, and went to work… for housing for those most in need.

Do you want to share your perspective? Email Tara Collins with your story.

99 Minute Way Seminar Outlines Investment Approach for People of Modest Means

The Lace Mill hosts The 99 Minute Way, a free seminar on basic investing literacy based in long-term investing strategy. The free seminar, scheduled for October 23 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. is open to the public, and will be held in the West Gallery at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston.

“The 99 Minute Way is NOT a stock picking class, but rather a learning session on how people of modest incomes can make the most of their savings and investments. Seminar leaders are not salespeople looking to sell services,” notes Jennifer Naylor, event coordinator of The 99-Minute Way. “The 99 Minute Way is a personal educational program for sound, long-term investing taught by two investment professionals, Michael Harvey and Phillip Kasofsky. Using established principles, the pair teaches people how to invest on their own, saving money and building capital for life goals. The 99 Minute Way offers clear direction information and support to audiences hungry for guidance on managing their personal investing and on building wealth.”

Attendees will walk away with an understanding of key financial terms and investing concepts, along with actionable direction on opening accounts and directing their investment dollars. “Michael and Phillip are accessible guides whose program has been developed out of epic fails and solid success in investing their own capital,” adds Naylor. “This program runs 99 minutes, and participants are welcome to stay after to ask questions or comment on what they have learned.” This free seminar is open to anyone interested in gaining an understanding of their financial future.

Free childcare will be provided along with light refreshments will be served. A question-and-answer period will follow the lecture. Contact Jennifer Naylor for more information at jennifer@mottspoint.com or call (845) 419-2361.

 

Jazz Masters Perform at Lace Mill on October 8

JazzMasters perform at The Lace Mill on October 8 at 4pThe Lace Mill hosts jazz masters from around the world on Sunday, October 8 at 4 p.m. in The Lace Mill East Gallery, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. The afternoon concert features multiple acts of artistry including rich musical pieces performed by the region’s most talented musicians and performers, as well as on-site, live painting.

Coordinated by Lace Mill resident-musician Michael Bisio, the jazz ensemble promises a concert worthy of the Ulster Performing Arts Center. Iva Bittova brings excellence of voice and violin. Anais Maviel sings as well. Ivo Perelman accompanies on tenor sax, with Michael Bisio on bass. Painter Nancy Ostrovsky will paint during the performance, inspired by onlookers and the musical experience.

Well-established reviewers have this to say about the performance line-up:

“Iva Bittova is an extraordinary artist. Raw and refined, passionate and contained, she has the soul of a gypsy, the voice of a troubadour, and the mind of a genius,” according to NPR’s All Things Considered.

Ms. Maviel, a vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, doesn’t work like a typical singer; her process is so deeply rooted as to be almost subliminal. She seems to throw herself at her notes, as if seeking a sound that might convey pure energetics,” says Giovanni Russonello, The New York Times

“Nancy Ostrovsky is a pioneer of performance painting, an art form that has not yet been embraced by galleries and museums but has earned her a dedicated following nonetheless,” Barbara Pollack writer for The New York Times, Art in America, Artnews and Time Out New York

“Ivo Perelman is perhaps the greatest musical living artist of our time,”@CriticalJazz

“The fleet-fingered and pitch-perfect Bisio ends the piece with an absolutely jaw-dropping solo,” Bill Tilland

Visitors are encouraged to contribute a $10 suggested donation. Parking is located on Manor Avenue and Progress Street. For more information, contact Michael Bisio.

Artist in Vacancy Exhibit Highlights Newburgh Architecture September 30

Artist in Vacancy Exhibit September 30Newburgh Community Land Bank presents two Artist-in-Vacancy exhibits this week. The first exhibition, organized by Laura Genes, involves work done on-site for the larger RUPCO project around 39 Johnston Street in Newburgh, NY by craftsmen at Affordable Housing Concepts. The architectural installation at 39A Johnston will showcase the new restoration work alongside original architectural details. In addition to highlighting the skilled work done by the workmen onsite, this presentation of the old and the new side-by-side hopes to spark conversation about the value of architectural character and the will necessary to upkeep it. 

Times Herald-Record reporter Leonard Sparks recently featured local craftsmen and the crew’s initiative to recreate and replicate moldings and interior finish trim in a make-shift woodworking studio at 39 Johnston. This exhibit is an opportunity to see the building under-construction and witness the handiwork of the craftsman helping to rebuild Newburgh.

The installation will be open for visitation from noon to 6pm on Saturday, September 30 and will be followed by a lecture by Andrew Linn of BLD, an architect and historian who will be presenting about the legacy of AJ Downing, a pioneer of American architecture. With the help of the Newburgh Community Land Bank, Andrew Linn, Jack Becker and Laura Genes have produced a text about Downing and how his works fit into a larger American canon. This essay has been formatted into a poster and will be available for guests to take home with them. 

The second Artist-in-Vancacy exhibit, GRNASFCK, by Coleen Tuite and Ian Quate will embrace 122/123 Lander from 1 to 6 p.m. on September 30. Click here for more on the artists and their outdoor installation. Come meet the artists over backyard BBQ. Both events are free and open to the public.

ABOUT THE VENUE, 39 JOHNSTON STREET, NEWBURGH: Former home to Newburgh photographer Jacob Ruben, and author of many historic Newburgh Postcards, was a vacant building for many years until the Newburgh Community Land Bank acquired the building from the City. After environmental rehabilitation and stabilization work, the building was transferred to RUPCO as part of a larger 15-property scatter site development utilizing Historic Tax Credits, Low Income Housing Tax Credits, and construction lending from Sterling National Bank, to restore the neighborhood in pockets. The effort will establish 45 new apartments for low-moderate income individuals and their families. The rehabilitation is currently underway, with the first series of homes available in Winter 2018 and the remainder rolling out through Summer 2018. 

ABOUT THE ARTIST: Laura Genes was born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and educated in New York City. She studied architecture at the Cooper Union. Through the use of photography and installation, she describes a human element of the built environment, which is otherwise absent from technical plans and sections. By forcing the body back into structures, the permanence of both forms is put into question. The built form takes on the vulnerability of human-nature and the human body adopts the monumental qualities of a landmark. Both architecture and humans are made to perform in specific time-scales and lifespans; in the case of both, neglecting that destiny is the only way to carry-on. Laura makes work to ask: how can structures preserve our poetry and how can we lend our poetry to structures? Find out more about the exhibit here.

Career Opportunity: Intake Administrator

RDAC Homeownership Preservation Counselor position open

RDAC is no longer accepting applications for this position.

RUPCO is hiring an Intake Administrator for its Orange County subsidiary, RDAC located in Walden, NY. The Intake Administrator reports directly to the Housing Manager.  This full-time position has duties which will assist in the intake and clerical aspects of RDAC program.  This position is also responsible to assist the Executive Director with administrative tasks as needed:    
  
Position Responsibilities:

  • Greet visitors and clients by phone or at the front desk
  • Assist clients with general information
  • Provide clerical support for RDAC office staff
  • Data entry into RDAC’s client data management system
  • Handle yearly re-certifications and other program-related follow-up correspondence for programs
  • Complete and oversee initial intakes and take responsibility for basic file preparation, maintenance, and archiving
  • Assemble quarterly reports, update tracking logs and other computer data processing as needed
  • Coordinate maintenance requests on office equipment
  • Order office supplies
  • Assist Executive Director with clerical support as needed
  • Other duties as assigned in line with administrative support

Required Knowledge, Skills, Education and Experience:

  • Able to communicate effectively
  • Must have excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to work with diverse groups
  • Computer literacy and prior clerical experience is required

Salary & Benefits:

  • Salary range is mid-upper $20’s based on experience
  • Full-time, 35-hour work week position
  • Includes health benefits and paid vacation
  • Position is located at RDAC office, 2 South Montgomery Street, Walden

Please submit notice of interest for this position to Faithmoore@ocrdac.org by Monday, October 2 at  noon.