Call for Homeowner Letter of Interest: New Paltz Housing Rehabilitation Program by 9/11

Kingston home solar system array install 2016The Town of New Paltz has the opportunity to apply for $500,000 in Community Development Block Grant funding from the New York State Office of Housing and Community Renewal to assist a minimum of (10) owner occupied homeowners with housing rehabilitation within the Town or Village New Paltz. This program will focus on energy-efficiency upgrades including residential solar system arrays. RUPCO will administer the program.

In addition to the installation of solar system arrays, eligible repairs may include: failing roofs, window replacement, mechanical systems, water systems, electrical systems, energy efficiency upgrades, structural or foundation repairs, flooring and building safety and code violations.

Interested homeowners should contact RUPCO by e-mail (sdolan@rupco.org) or call the HomeOwnership Center at (845) 331-9860 by September 11, 2017. Letters of Interest can also be obtained at the New Paltz Town Hall.

Submit your Letter of Interest by September 11, 2017

The Letter of Interest below does not commit you to participation. However, RUPCO will contact you if funding is allocated to this program. If funding becomes available, RUPCO will invite you to an informational meeting outlining program details.

Eligibility Requirements: Applicants must own and occupy the home as their primary residence (homes in parks are not eligible). The property must be up to date with all taxes, mortgage payments, and homeowners Insurance.

Applicants must meet the gross annual income guidelines below by household size.

Area Median Income for elgible New Paltz homeowners for this grant

Letter of Interest New Paltz Housing Rehabilitation Program

Owner(s)/Name on Deed:_________________________________________

Property Address:________________________________________________

Mailing Address if Different:  ______________________________________

Township:  Town of New Paltz     OR     Village of New Paltz

Phone:____________________________________________

E-mail:____________________________________________

Household Size: _________       Bedroom Size: _________

Gross Household Income: $__________________________

Interested in Solar:  Yes___   No___

Home Repair Needs:_________________________________

13 MISFITS shows at The Lace Mill September 2-15

13 MISFITS 13 MISFITS is the newest exhibit featured at The Lace Mill for September 2 through 15 as a runner-up to the subsequent art show, the Arts MidHudson Kingston Art Walk. A mixture of abstract art spanning sculpture, painting, and prints will be on display for two weeks and allow viewers fresh insight to traditional form. Originally entitled, “It Happened One Art Show,” it became “13 MISFITS” after Clark Gable’s last movie to convey the 13 artists who don’t conform to standard art practices or ideals.

13 MISFITS will feature works from nine Lace Mill artists: Daniel Cardenas, Chelsea Culpepper, Aaron Lockhart, Lark Kidder, James Martin, Kazuma Oshita, Felix Olivieri, Charlotte Tusch, and Lexi Williams. Four guest artists from the region — Naoko Oshima, Susan Silverman, Fred Woller, and Jessie Freund – are also featured. The show, aptly titled “13 MISFITS” celebrates the number of artists within the show. Each of them has a sense of quirkiness that also sets them apart in their creative processes.

Lace Mill artist-resident James Martin coordinated and curated the event. He expects a great turnout for such a short timeframe. “I hope we will get a lot of good people who will come First Saturday (a Kingston-wide open art studio night). I hope they will enjoy what they see. I hope they will recognize that we are trying to be a part of our community and to satisfy the community with exceptionally good work.”

The opening artist reception is Saturday, September 2 from 5-8pm in the Main Gallery, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. Contact James Martin for additional information at (347) 387-6874.

Local Artist Finds Solace in Lace Mill, Continues Artistic Journey Despite Setbacks

Lace Mill resident-artist Dawn BisioDawn Bisio’s home environment is stable now, but that was not always the case just two years ago. Recently divorced and motivated to redirect her life path, she moved to the Hudson Valley from Westchester, coincidentally at the same time RUPCO announced a call for artists to #WhereArtistsLive. After financial upset with divorce legal fees, she found opportunity at The Lace Mill to be the silver lining in turbulent times.

“The Lace Mill has been motivating for me artistically and the creative community has helped me feel secure and supported, and turned around the worst times,” she remembers.

However, landing an apartment wasn’t straightforward. At first, she missed the first lottery round of new tenants. But she stayed within the area, stayed positive, and reflected on possibilities that might arise if an applicant dropped out or didn’t follow through with a lease. So she waited, and checked in with RUPCO from time to time. Luckily, during RUPCO’s second lottery wave for the newly finished East end—which was under final construction—she got the call. Ecstatic, she agreed to move in and start fresh in her career and home life. She now shares memories with fellow tenants who moved in the same time she did, and they bond over communal living quirks and resident building meet-ups.

Besides sharing the trickle-down effects of administrative check-ins and construction work during the renovation period, Bisio shares other fond thoughts of residents at Lace Mill. “I run into people who are truly fascinating, kind and supporting, and if we [my husband and I] were out by ourselves, we would feel isolated and lonely sometimes—here we can have a glass of wine outside with people we live with, and that’s really nice to have.”

Of course, there are periods when communal living is a bit overwhelming, and Bisio states she sometimes “just needs to retreat and find my own source of peace. I personally like peace and quiet, but I wouldn’t trade this living.” She finds serenity in her own company when she is not spending time collaborating on art shows or conversing with neighbors.

The outside world beckons her attention in between these solitary times for exploration and discovery. “Shapes, people outdoors, moments of reflection, and also things that happen to me personally,” provide sparks of insight into subjective reasoning.

In the larger social domain, things that may not make sense immediately are great catalysts for creative energy. The mystery is what may be alluring to contemplate, like an unsolved riddle that provides more questions than solutions. Bisio notes that maybe things—and people—can convey interesting truths to examine without making sense. “I always try to find a way to process things, especially things that I can’t figure out. Art and writing helps translate experiences or questions, and leads me to an answer—not the answer—but it helps me to make sense of the world and to create things of beauty.”

Allowing herself to branch out is also a large part of being inspired. She finds that while she is toning down on writing, she is able to explore other art forms that clue in on aspects of herself that weren’t revealed before. A recent piece entitled “Mobile Home,” made of a globe that is evocative of the Sun, explores her identity being a Korean adoptee. Another piece featured in the upcoming Dirty Laundry exhibit is a mixed-media work on a canvas box that opens up and allows viewers to see “inside her dreams,” which are written in text on a tree background. Many of her pieces are a result of abstract ideas that echo memories, and are difficult to convey in the real world.

“A lot of my pieces involve construction, and part of the challenge is knowing ‘how do I suspend it correctly, what materials do and don’t work, and how do I translate the pure idea into a work of art?’”

Though home is “like a base,” the foundation that promises security while figuring out the mechanics of her ideas, she hopes to travel in the near future, and have Lace Mill as a part-time home. But with Kingston’s arts district on the rise, she may have incentive to stay here and develop further. “It’s exciting to see where we are going. People are doing all sorts of events: kids events, different workshops, and Midtown Kingston’s growing arts district, so in 10 years from now, who knows what will be happening.”

For now, Bisio continues to shine her light in The Lace Mill gallery, displaying works that reflect her background and experience. Her pieces are testaments to what she has seen and felt, and the light she often utilizes in her works parallel the beauty and strength in her journey of self-knowledge.

Getting to a place of comfort and acceptance isn’t always easy. Bisio has been criticized for being an artist, a general stereotype and stigma still surround the “artistic” label. Those labels — lazy, disorganized, scattered — weigh on her confidence. Instead of focusing on the negative that would drain her livelihood, she states, “I think it’s best to be true to yourself—you have to do what inspires you and not be influenced by other’s opinions. People will think differently about what’s good and bad. So just do the work, no matter how slow the process, even if it’s just one step a day.”

Applying to and inquiring about The Lace Mill proved to be winning leaps in a lottery draw of applicants, and her current endeavors in participating at gallery exhibits are antecedents for growth in a supportive setting—who knows where these little steps will take her next.

Couple Find Creativity, Privacy at Lace Mill

Youko & Kazuma Yamamato, resident-artists at The Lace MillBefore living at the Lace Mill, Youko and Kazuma owned a home in Gardiner with scenic views and remote neighbors. Never did they think they would receive housing assistance. But the day came when they could no longer afford to pay their mortgage and keep up with other expenses that piled up quickly. Eventually they found a place that suited their needs, in rural New York. They think living in the Lace Mill community experience helps them to focus their time and energy on their New Paltz restaurant, Gomen-Kudasai, and not on costly house maintenance or routine upkeep.

Rising taxes eventually squeezed the Yamamoto’s out of an affordable living space in NYC. They then moved upstate to Gardiner and began looking for other housing options as they could not afford the mortgage on their restaurant income. Thankfully, their son’s Waldorf School teacher suggested The Lace Mill for local artists. “We got the interview about two weeks later, and fortunately they took us in, and now we are very comfortable,” Youko says.

Youko elaborates that living in Lace Mill provides the same security as does a home without an assistance program. “I feel like it’s our nest right now,” she says. “We know that it is not our final home, but it is our hideout community for us.” The Yamamoto’s have a safe space to lead their own lives and artistically create in privacy.

“I know a lot of artists who don’t have comfortable living,” states Youko. “RUPCO is an excellent resource to utilize, especially for artists who want to continue their work but have limited means to purchase supplies or rent studio spaces.”

Following in good fortune with RUPCO’s help, Kazuma found a workplace in Saugerties in which he is able to continue his metalsmith career. His original studio was in an upstairs workshop in High Falls; residents below would regularly complain of the machinery noise. Now, he uses the space without worry about disrupting neighbors below.

Bon Dori Dance Festival for Peace, August 6, 2017Youko and Kazuma believe in community contribution and welcome opportunity for Lace Mill residents to feel like they are living as part of the real world. Youko and Kazuma believe it is wise to take responsibility for the space they rent, and not fall back on complimentary services to elevate their experience beyond typical means, otherwise complacency and a distorted sense of entitlement may arise. That’s why they’re hosting the Bon Odori Festival on August 6th, as a way to give back to the community.

The Bon-Odori Dance Festival for Peace, and other RUPCO programs fiber offer positive effects. People of modest means and their families contribute much to the community when given the opportunity to live peacefully amongst neighbors. Find out more about the couple’s fundraiser on June 23 and the Bon Dori Dance Festival on August 6.

Senior homeowners eligible for NYS HTFC RESTORE PROGRAM

older man and older woman as a couple on park benchFor a limited time, RUPCO is offering available funds for emergency home repairs through the NYS Housing Trust Fund Corporation (HFTC) RESTORE Program. RUPCO plans to help seven or more senior homeowners in Ulster County with emergency repair funding up to $10,000 including program fees.

 Funding Availability: Not all eligible applicants will be selected. If demand exceeds funding availability, those with most feasible and highest need projects will be selected first.

Basic program requirements:

  • Must own and reside in a home in Ulster County
  • Must be up to date with mortgage, tax payments and have Homeowners Insurance
  • Household total gross income at or below the 80% Area Medium Income limits for Ulster County
  • Must have an approved emergency repair need that is within budget
  • Dwelling must not have other major repair issues
  • Project must be able to complete within 30 days by a qualified contractor.
  • The homeowner must be 60 years of age or older
  • Property Maintenance Declaration form filed
  • Owners must live in the home for 3 years after service
  • Homeowners to supply 2 estimates from local contractors

Typical Emergency repairs or replacement covered:

  • Failing water heaters, well pumps, pressure tanks, supply lines, septic tanks, fields, drains
  • Accessibility improvements such as wheelchair ramps, lifts etc.
  • Leaking plumbing, Leaking roofs and failing heating systems
  • Electrical safety issues, Broken steps, landings, railings
  • Other emergency health and safety issues

Annual gross income limit for household size

1 person 2 people 3 people 4 people 5 people 6 people 7 people
$44,000 $50,250 $56,550 $62,800 $67,850 $72,850 $77,900

For more information or to apply today, contact Sally Dolan 845-331-9860 ext. 227

Equal Housing Opportunity logo black&white EnglishProgram funding is provided based on eligibility, funding availability and project feasibility. Other restrictions and conditions may apply. Funding provided through the NYS Housing Trust Fund Corporation.

 

Independent News & Articles about The Lace Mill & its Resident-artists

 

Group of Lace Mill artists in July 2016The Lace Mill: Resident-artists

Kingston artists find love at the Lace Mill, Spectrum News 8/4/17

Affordable housing advocates say region in desperate need (Charlotte Tusch), Spectrum TV News 6/22/17

James Martin: Inspired By the Old Masters & Kingston’s New MAD Creatives, MADKingston blog 6/20/17

Dreamers & Doers: Frank Waters, community organizer-digital media creator, Lace Mill resident-artist, Kingston Happenings 4/15/17

Capital of Culture: Kingston, Chronogram March 2017 page 30

Spotlight on Filmmakers: Sarah Carlson, Dawn (Wan) Bisio, Rubi Rose, Felix Olivieri, Frank Waters), MADKingston Blog 2017 

Chronogram launches community conversations (first session at The Lace Mill 2/8/17)

Collaborative Catalyst: RUPCO’s Lace Mill, Chronogram February 2017 page 51

The Lace Mill: The Building

 

Lace Mill apartment complex recognized as one ‘Preservation’s Best of 2016’, Daily Freeman 2/28/17

RUPCO Featured in 2016 LISC Annual Report, March 2017

The Lace Mill Revitalizes Midtown Kingston, Hudson Valley Magazine 3/17/17

RUPCO begins survey of Midtown Kingston residents for neighborhood renewal opinions, Daily Freeman 8/20/16

Historic lace factory becomes artist housing, page 10,  Affordable Housing Finance 2015 LIHTC Yearbook, December 2015

RUPCO aims to resolve lead problem in Kingston’s Lace Mill apartments by end of 2015, The Daily Freeman 12/1/15

RUPCO, Lace Mill residents dealing with lead contamination issues, Kingston Times 11/25/15

Artist Housing Helps Revitalize Midtown Kingston, N.Y., Affordable Housing Finance, 10/29/15

Artists find new homes at affordable housing complex in Kingston, Times Herald-Record, 8/14/15

Affordable Housing Needs Local Champion, Times Herald-Record, 7/16/15

Renovation of Kingston Factory – Hudson Valley Week in Review with Amy Greene 2/121/15 (video)

Former Lace Curtain Mill to be transformed into artists’ housing – Hudson Valley News, 2/18/15

Applications Now Being Accepted for Artists’ Housing in Kingston’s Former Lace Curtain Mill — The Daily Freeman, 2/16/15

Conversion of former Lace Curtain Mill on track for completion — The Daily Freeman, 2/15/15 (video)

Conversion of Vacant Kingston Factory into Housing for Artists Gets $412k Grant – The Daily Freeman, 2/3/15

Kingston event heralds start of lace curtain factory renovation (VIDEOS) – Daily Freeman 4/1/14

‘Paint Can Opening’ on April 1 to celebrate the beginning of construction to convert vacant Kingston factory into artists’ housing – Daily Freeman 3/16/14

Finances & Credit Workshop on July 25, Free

Free finances & credit workshopBring a friend or partner to this free Finances & Credit Workshop hosted by Citizens Bank and RUPCO on Tuesday, July 25 at 5:30 p.m. at The Kirkland, 2 Main Street, Kingston.

Get all your questions answered about credit scores, how to improve yours and how to meet your personal financial goals for yourself and family. 

Light refreshments will be served. On-street parking is available or within the Ulster County municipal lot.

Seating is limited so please RSVP by phone 845-331-9860 or email Yesenia Gutierrez.