Watercolor Demo at The Lace Mill October 19

The Lace Mill resident-artist community opens its doors to the Mezzanine studio to showcase a watercolor demonstration at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. Thursday, October 19 from 6-7p, Hudson Valley watercolorist and Woodstock School of Art instructor Staats Fasoldt shares his mastery of paints and techniques for both new and accomplished artists.

Staats Fasoldt, watercolorist and instructor at Woodstock School of Art

photo courtesy of Woodstock School of Art

This demonstration is open to the public. Freewill donations are encouraged and will benefit The Lace Mill Arts Council, future exhibits, workshops, and demonstrations. For more information, contact James Martin (347) 387-6874.

Demonstration logistics: The Lace Mill’s front door will be open and a greeter will direct you to the Mezzanine studio. Free on-street parking is available on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street. All are welcome to attend.

99 Minute Way Seminar Outlines Investment Approach for People of Modest Means

The Lace Mill hosts The 99 Minute Way, a free seminar on basic investing literacy based in long-term investing strategy. The free seminar, scheduled for October 23 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. is open to the public, and will be held in the West Gallery at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston.

“The 99 Minute Way is NOT a stock picking class, but rather a learning session on how people of modest incomes can make the most of their savings and investments. Seminar leaders are not salespeople looking to sell services,” notes Jennifer Naylor, event coordinator of The 99-Minute Way. “The 99 Minute Way is a personal educational program for sound, long-term investing taught by two investment professionals, Michael Harvey and Phillip Kasofsky. Using established principles, the pair teaches people how to invest on their own, saving money and building capital for life goals. The 99 Minute Way offers clear direction information and support to audiences hungry for guidance on managing their personal investing and on building wealth.”

Attendees will walk away with an understanding of key financial terms and investing concepts, along with actionable direction on opening accounts and directing their investment dollars. “Michael and Phillip are accessible guides whose program has been developed out of epic fails and solid success in investing their own capital,” adds Naylor. “This program runs 99 minutes, and participants are welcome to stay after to ask questions or comment on what they have learned.” This free seminar is open to anyone interested in gaining an understanding of their financial future.

Free childcare will be provided along with light refreshments will be served. A question-and-answer period will follow the lecture. Contact Jennifer Naylor for more information at jennifer@mottspoint.com or call (845) 419-2361.

 

Artwork Inspired by Social Justice Issues focus of Lace Mill Art Exhibit

Lanette Hughes painting abstractOctober is Domestic Violence Awareness Month and coincides with artwork focused on human rights, domestic violence, and world hunger. This is Lanette Hughes’s social activism movement in the form of an art show. This exhibit will take place in all three Lace Mill galleries, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston on October 7 from 3-8 p.m.

Hughes will show 30+ paintings reflecting social issues; all of which, upon their sale, will benefit local organizations that deal with human rights issues. Local nonprofits slated to receive artwork sales include Family of Woodstock, New Paltz, Kingston, Ellenville; the Darmstadt Shelter; Caring Hands Soup Kitchen; Clinton Avenue Methodist Church; MyKingstonKids; O+ Festival; Safe Harbors; and RUPCO. Global organizations include Women in Black and The Haitian People’s Project.

Hughes’ pieces directly relate to real life events. Her abstracts convey deeper messages without being overly explicit. Many pieces depict victims physically harmed, though the paintings don’t graphically portray clear wounds or detailed damage. Each portrayal speaks volumes about issues that are underneath the surface of so many lives — including her own — and nobody would know just by quick observation.

For example, “Human Beings are Not Created for Target Practice” has military undertones. The message conveys a simple thought: if military personnel were stripped of their uniforms, would enemies still shoot them? “Women Running” features women fleeing from human trafficking groups, a worldwide issue that defies ethnicity, gender, and age. Another piece portrays children affected by nerve gassing bundled in blankets; only their faces show, their bodies eerily shrouded mummification-style.

“My hope is that more artists will contribute (to the larger conversation), to include in their work social awareness for change,” says Hughes. “I’d like to see a whole day, week, or month, when artists everywhere do a whole show on a particular social issue.” She also hopes this art show stirs local activism by providing curiosity about what goes on behind the scenes in lives of our acquaintances, co-workers, family, and friends.

Throughout the exhibit’s run, speakers will talk about relevant issues that affect communities. Guy Kempe, Vice President of Community Development at RUPCO, will speak on “Housing, Creative Placemaking, & Community Development” on October 7 at 4:30 p.m. “Aligned with social justice, ‘creative placemaking’ is the proposition that arts and cultural expression, joined with housing, helps to energize community and revitalize disinvested places for minority and disenfranchised populations,” Kempe says. Poet Nancy Smith follows at 6 p.m. with readings from her works that concern human rights.

Filmmaker and veteran Marty Klein will talk about veterans’ issues on October 14, showing his film entitled, “Why Can’t We Serve.”

All artworks are for sale, with 75% of the proceeds donated to organizations that support social justice efforts. The artist retains 25% to cover material expenses associated with making the artwork. Painting prices are negotiable, with no reasonable offer refused. For more information, contact Lace Mill artist-resident Lanette Hughes at (845) 532-3538 or visit her Facebook page LK Hughes.

Community Lunch 2017: November 8

Community Lunch brings friends, family and supporters around the table for an annual discussion. This year, we’re talking about community wealth-building, creating pathways to equity and opportunity, with housing for everyone thrown into the mix.

Keynote speaker Maurice Jones, President & CEO of Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC), will share his perspective on how our communities can change and revitalize neighborhoods through a local approach to housing, health, safety, and job creation. With deep experience in both the public and private sectors, Maurice Jones took the helm as LISC’s fourth president & CEO in September 2016. Immediately prior to joining LISC, he served as the secretary of commerce for the Commonwealth of Virginia, where he managed 13 state agencies focused on statewide economic needs. He previously served as deputy secretary for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) overseeing operations for the agency and its 8,900 staff members. The depth and breadth of his experience in policy making, social services and legal arenas give him a unique perspective on how communities thrive when they work together closest to home. And he’s here to share that insight with you on November 8.

RUPCO is also honoring
TBA, Community Partner Award
TBA, Lifetime Achievement Award
Harold Renzo, Community Inspirator Award

Lunch tickets cost $35. Bring a friend or colleague. Pay for your tickets online now or mail your check to Community Lunch, 289 Fair Street, Kingston, NY 12401. 

Take your RSVP to the next level by sponsoring Community Lunch at one of five levels between $100 to $2500. All sponsorships include lunch RSVPs. Pay online or download these sponsorship forms and mail in a check. You too can join these local businesses who believe that Home Matters:

Premier Sponsor:
M&T Bank green logo

 

Community Sponsor:

 

Sustainability Sponsor:
Dutton Architecture

Partner: Central Hudson Gas & Electric, Sawyer Savings, UW Marx Construction

Supporting: Cannon, Heyman & Weiss, Coldwell Banker Village Green, Daniel D. Gagnon CPA, EFPR Group CPAs, Rondout Savings Bank Ryan & Ryan Insurance Brokers, TRUSTCO Bank

Community Lunch 2017 word cloud

Call for Homeowner Letter of Interest: New Paltz Housing Rehabilitation Program

Kingston home solar system array install 2016The Town of New Paltz has the opportunity to apply for $500,000 in Community Development Block Grant funding from the New York State Office of Housing and Community Renewal to assist a minimum of (10) owner occupied homeowners with housing rehabilitation within the Town or Village New Paltz. This program will focus on energy-efficiency upgrades including residential solar system arrays. RUPCO will administer the program.

In addition to the installation of solar system arrays, eligible repairs may include: failing roofs, window replacement, mechanical systems, water systems, electrical systems, energy efficiency upgrades, structural or foundation repairs, flooring and building safety and code violations.

Interested homeowners should contact RUPCO by e-mail (sdolan@rupco.org) or call the HomeOwnership Center at (845) 331-9860. Letters of Interest can also be obtained at the New Paltz Town Hall.

Letters of Interest are accepted ona rrolling basis. Please apply ASAP.

The Letter of Interest below does not commit you to participation. However, RUPCO will contact you if funding is allocated to this program. If funding becomes available, RUPCO will invite you to an informational meeting outlining program details.

Eligibility Requirements: Applicants must own and occupy the home as their primary residence (homes in parks are not eligible). The property must be up to date with all taxes, mortgage payments, and homeowners Insurance.

Applicants must meet the gross annual income guidelines below by household size.

Area Median Income for elgible New Paltz homeowners for this grant

Letter of Interest New Paltz Housing Rehabilitation Program

Owner(s)/Name on Deed:_________________________________________

Property Address:________________________________________________

Mailing Address if Different:  ______________________________________

Township:  Town of New Paltz     OR     Village of New Paltz

Phone:____________________________________________

E-mail:____________________________________________

Household Size: _________       Bedroom Size: _________

Gross Household Income: $__________________________

Interested in Solar:  Yes___   No___

Home Repair Needs:_________________________________

Derby Duo Build Soapbox Cars at Lace Mill

Are you ready to rumble? Maybe not in a horse-powered car, but the Kingston Soapbox Derby will have your heart racing as all-star soapbox cars whiz down the Rondout hill. Kingston’s annual Soapbox Derby is a celebration of artists spanning the spectrum of expression, bringing out the most vibrant and lucid creations from young and old. With new mechanical machines cruising down Rondout Hill, a piece of history replays itself and comes back fresh in ingenuity and cultural awareness, ready for 21st century acknowledgment and a new critical lens.

Felix Olivieri, Lace Mill artist resident and soapbox contestant, gears up for this event weeks in advance. His commitment to soapbox dates back to its inception 22 years ago. He’s proudly raced cars reminiscent of DeLorean from “Back to the Future,” a “Futurama” ship, and his own version of a hot rod that “shot confetti from the back.” Though his past creations were anything but ordinary, this year, he wanted to do something extra special, honoring this year’s theme “Tributes.”

“One of the things I noticed is there is a lot of people from the City up here…so I thought, ‘let me do a subway train.’ The joke behind it: everyone from the City commutes and eventually comes up here.”

RUPCO graffitti subway car by Felix Olivieri

Photo: Joan Horton

While the NYC commute stirs something—maybe a headache—in many, a deeper connection circles back to the art world in local Kingston. Olivieri grew up in the Bronx. He remembers the incredible images sprayed onto sides of buildings and on trains rushing past his line of vision when he would venture out to see new artistry work. “For me, that would have been my first gallery show—the subway trains—passing by and seeing the different styles people do.”

Most of the graffiti he saw “would only last a day or two because at the time, the mayor in office would demand cleaning up all the subways and trains. And there was this whole big thing about what is art, and to us—to younger people— it was urban art, but to them, it was destroying NYC.”

As a former art store owner, Olivieri sought to keep the spirit of urban artists alive. Oddly, it wasn’t the younger generations that would ask so much about the store’s graffiti section. Instead, people in their 50’s and 60’s wanted to take graffiti classes and learn the street art techniques. Though the classes never ran, Olivieri was struck by the fascination that older generations had for a commonly youth-stigmatized art form.

Graffiti has gained a following and is more acceptable across business and political districts now. Kingston may be a leader in graffiti experimentation, since a stroll around the city lends a viewing of dynamic modern art visuals. “Kingston has become very open to the idea of the graffiti style and it being used as ‘beautification’ rather than destroying artwork the next day. Many of those old-style graffiti artists are part of the community and they don’t have create it in secrecy.”

Illicit graffiti entails legal issues, and therefore acceptance of it is hard-won. On Olivieri’s soapbox this year, Lace Mill residents help promote awareness of artistic expression by signing their names on his soapbox subway car in graffiti-like fashion, paying tribute to the oft-stereotyped craft. Broadway Arts is giving a hand in creating some alternate styles of graffiti on the sides of his soapbox, mixing in their vision with others, too. Click here for a Facebook video of Felix strutting down Broadway with the K Train (video courtesy of Leonie Grande).

Frank Waters, fellow Lace Mill artist-resident, helped Olivieri by dabbling in the painting process. Inspired to start a soapbox for My Kingston Kids, he pulled together supplies and pieced together one in which young hands decorated. Ultimately, the “Pirates of Kingston” boat will make an encore appearance in Kingston’s Halloween Fest. (This year’s Halloween theme is “Pirates of Kingston.”) My Kingston Kids is a youth program that focuses on “children’s events and activities to encourage children to enjoy themselves through fun and educating ways,” says Waters.

When Derby Day arrived, kids cheered on soapbox contestants, the younger crowd making up a large part of the 2000+ audience that usually attends The Kingston Soapbox Derby every year. Some  soapboxes rolled in laughs and catered to young imaginations. Others were made for alternative competitions. Wackier pieces from previous years include a giant toaster, two girls seated playing cards on two toilets, and a giant metal dragon made of wrenches welded together shot that fire.

This year’s Soapbox Derby – held on Sunday, August 20, 2017 – recognized the following creations with awards:

  • People’s Choice award went to: A Tribute to Gene Wilder & Willy Wonka by Possibility Studios; built by Martin Elting, Julia Pierce, Tom Harvey, Cole Elting, Tom Henning, and Kathy Hughe.
  • Kids First Place went to: Police Truck by Alexander and Mom’s.
  • Tributes award went to Horticultural Horrors by Kevin Muth and Marker Snyder.

Congrats to all ~ we hope to see you next year!

Senior Resident Finds Peace of Mind At Theater Workplace

Ever go to the Rosendale Theater to watch the latest film? In the booth, the projectionist is a humble man dedicated to his work. Anthony Cacchio, a Park Heights resident at RUPCO’s senior housing campus in Rosendale, NY, casts glimmers of life through his own lens. He’s glad to be serving the community, and intends to keep working as long as he is able.

For over 40 years, Cacchio has been working in the theater business to ensure the sound and video quality are up to company standards. He works closely with an engineer who shows him how to operate the equipment, and if there is a technical issue, he can bank on the engineer to fix the problem in a jiffy—even from home. Indeed, growing up without lightning speed electronics that send signals in milliseconds makes living in this era a bit foreign, but he manages to learn new skills and train every once in a while to keep up with the ever-changing technological advancements.

Growing up in a much different period of film and TV, Cacchio remembers his favorite shows from the 1930s, at the beginnings of the film industry. He laments that he does not watch recordings of them because they remind him of young celebrities who embodied vigor and have since passed away or have consummated their years of acting. So Cacchio gets his drama fill from working night shifts six to seven days a week, and prefers his home life to be quiet and serene.

He has been living at Park Heights for 5 years now, “and was lucky to get in right away.” Cacchio describes the home-finding experience as an easy process. “RUPCO gave me a nice comfortable place, in a nice area, and I am content here.”

Back when he was living at his parent’s home, he was also content with the peace that large plots of land could afford. Cacchio remembers his father used to cut the grass with a John Deere tractor. Every once in a while, neighborhood grandchildren would visit and provide noise that the day-to-day environment lacked. When his parents passed away, he and his brother inherited their childhood home. But, he explained, it just wasn’t suitable for happy living; the reminders of his parents were just too much when he walked past their room. Apart from the constant emotional tug, Cacchio decided that one person doesn’t belong in a six-room house, when a family could easily enjoy the space. Selling the property, he ventured on to rent an apartment at Park Heights, where he lives close by ladies who are familiar faces in his daily routines. “We treat everybody as buddies,” he says; if the ladies don’t see him for a day or two, they worry.

Anthony Cacchio, senior resident at Park HeightsLuckily, 85-year-old Cacchio has good genes. His father lived until he was 91; his mother, 90. He has clear intentions to keep on working, and “to make the best I can out of it.” Perhaps his hard work ethic is the family trait that keeps them so young; Cacchio used to assist his father in the tile and marble industry, working for other businesses to provide construction work.

With years of experience behind him, Cacchio continues to play an important role in the community, including being a happy parent to his cat, “Princess.” She lets him know what foods she does and doesn’t like, and insists that he stay in the room until she finishes eating. Her melodramatic personality entwined with a need for attention lends unique companionship, and Cacchio appreciates her taking center stage in their Park Heights home while he works behind-the-scenes.

Jake Michels joins RUPCO Senior Leadership Team

RUPCO welcomes Jake Michels as Director of Property Management at its Kingston office at 37 John Street. He will oversee issues relating to tenant property and maintenance, as well as coordinate best practices to ensure departmental efficiency. Michels, a graduate of Duchess County Community College, previously worked in management for luxury and commercial markets based in Poughkeepsie. He is currently studying for a real estate license; the educational background will provide him with a more comprehensive knowledge of the real estate field and property administration.

“I am excited to be here, to be a part of RUPCO’s mission and moving them forward. Over time, we can improve processes and increase usage of resident software to better our practices and building relationships,” states Michels, who currently resides in Poughkeepsie. Property management oversees building maintenance, tenant relations, and neighbor interaction. His personal philosophy on why stable housing is so important also influences his work approach. “Home Matters because it’s the foundation of our lives. Stable housing allows you to progress in all other areas, and allows you to progress as an individual.”

Michels recently went through the homebuying process himself after renting for years. He brings personal knowledge of the renting process to his job duties so he can better serve the tenants that live under RUPCO’s housing programs.

“Jake’s fresh perspective and diverse background in Property Management will be a great addition to the department,” says Vice President of Operations Sheila Kilpatrick. “RUPCO is growing its portfolio in the Hudson Valley. Jake’s ability to streamline processes and proactively prepare for new ventures will be invaluable.” RUPCO currently owns/manages 16 properties with 411 apartments providing homes to over 560 people. The majority of those residents represent the area’s most vulnerable populations: the elderly, seniors, disabled and working class families. In its $70-million real estate development pipeline. RUPCO plans to add another 171 units in 19 buildings at 4 locations.

Call for UC Homeowner Interest Letter: Septic System Repair/Replacement Grant Program

RUPCO, in coordination with the County of Ulster as the sponsor, is pursuing a grant opportunity to assist low- to moderate-income homeowners with private septic systems in need of repair or replacement.

RUPCO is requesting Ulster County homeowners with private septic systems that are failing and who are interested in participating in a grant program to provide basic information, so RUPCO can better identify the need for this type of grant program.

Interested homeowners should submit a Letter of Interest ASAP

Letters of Interest will be accepted on a rolling basis

  • by fax (845) 331-9864
  • mailed to 289 Fair Street, Kingston, NY 12401
  • hand-delivered to RUPCO’s HomeOwnership Center, 301 Fair Street, Kingston, NY 12401
  • or e-mail Sally Dolan

The Letter of Interest below does not commit you to participation. However, RUPCO will contact you if funding is allocated to this program. If funding becomes available, RUPCO will invite you to an informational meeting outlining program details.

Eligibility Requirements: 

  • Applicants must own and occupy the home with a deed in the name of at least one household member.
  • Homes in mobile home parks are not eligible.
  • The property must be up to date with all taxes, mortgage payments and homeowners Insurance.
  • Systems must be privately owned. Systems connected to public waste systems are not eligible.
  • City of Kingston residents are not eligible. Homeowners within the New York City Watershed are not eligible for this program; however, you may qualify for funding available through the Catskill Watershed Corporation.
  • Applicants must meet the gross annual income guidelines below by household size.

Letter of Interest Ulster County CDBG Well & Septic System Repair Program

Owner(s)/Name on Deed:___________________________________

Property Address:_______________________________________

Mailing Address if Different:  ______________________________________

Phone:_________________________

E-mail:___________________________

Household Size: _________       Bedroom Size: _________

Gross Household Income: $_______________________

Current septic system size in gallons:___________________________

 

 

Letter to the Editor: Petition for What is Right

In response to recent articles about Landmark Place — in particular RUPCO’s filing of an amended petition, Article 78 and HUD complaint — RUPCO CEO Kevin O’Connor distributed this letter to area news outlets. Some opted to print his comments in full; others not. Here is the complete content of that letter issued 8/22/17.

On behalf of our senior citizens and vulnerable elders, we filed an amended petition on July 11 as one strategy to protect our collective rights. While New York State law allows for a protest petition by neighbors of a proposed rezoning to trigger a super majority, the law is equally clear that if there’s a 100-foot-buffer between the rezoning and the neighbors, a protest petition from neighbors cannot force a super-majority for approval of the rezoning, and a simple majority vote is enough to approve it.

Let’s remember that a majority of the City of Kingston Common Council voted 5-to-4 in favor of a zoning change for this site. That is an expression of the democratic process and the will of the People of Kingston. While the City assumed the protest petition was valid, thus requiring a 7-to-2 vote to approve the zoning change, we believe the petition fails the legal requirements and should have been rejected. Therefore, we have filed an Article 78 and Declaratory judgment action that challenges the denial of the zoning change under our original petition as well. We think the courts will deem the original vote in favor of rezoning to be sufficient.

In addition, if necessary, we will also file a complaint with Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and will follow with a lawsuit against the City of Kingston for failing to make a reasonable accommodation for persons with disabilities. Both the federal Fair Housing Act (FHA) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) protect persons with disabilities from discrimination and require reasonable accommodations to be made by a municipality to ensure fair housing practices. Persons with disabilities are a protected class, no less important than race, sex, religion, national origin, color or familiar status. Those protected classes include several of our intended tenants: seniors with mental illness, seniors with substance use disorder, and seniors with physical impairments. The record is clear that certain members of the Common Council relied on inflammatory and discriminatory rhetoric against protected classes in making their decision on the original rezoning request. Simply put, a municipality may not make zoning or other land use decisions based on neighbors’ fears that a dwelling may be occupied by members of these protected classes.

While we harbor no ill will towards the neighbors who have protested against this project, we do believe it’s time – particularly given the hateful rhetoric that has been demonstrated across the country against persons of color, certain religious groups, and other protected classes – that the hateful rhetoric spoken here in Kingston against our most vulnerable senior citizens at public hearings and written in the comment sections of the newspaper and on social media stops, once and for all. Kingston has declared itself a sanctuary City and its leaders have almost universally spoken out against the culture of hate displayed elsewhere. It is time to take care of business at home and to stop treating people as “other” people! We stand with the majority of Kingston Common Council members who voted to support our proposed project.

We take no pleasure in bringing lawsuits against the City of Kingston, and we are troubled that the City has recently faced two other federal fair housing lawsuits. We hope the Common Council will take action to avoid unnecessary taxpayer expense by settling our claims without costly litigation. Between the cost of litigation and the loss of tax revenue this project would bring, all of the taxpayers of Kingston should not bear the burden of defending unlawful actions. We listened to the neighbors early on and responded by making reasonable accommodations in our proposal – we adjusted the age of the population to be age 55 and over for all tenants. The law requires the City to do no less. We were pleased to receive a negative declaration from the City of Kingston’s Planning Board and an endorsement from the Ulster County Planning Board prior to a favorable vote by the City’s Common Council to change the zoning. 

A proposal that is widely supported by the record is being held up by a handful of families who live next to the project. Their opposition is based on unfounded fears about the populations to be served, are veiled in arguments which the record reflects are unfounded. We reject any notion that simply living near senior and supportive housing will have a negative effect on people’s lives.

We are compelled to move forward based on our mission and the following facts:

  • The City of Kingston, based on the fact that it accepts federal Community Development Block Grant funds, has a duty to Affirmatively Further Fair Housing.
  • The need for affordable and supportive housing for the age 55 and over cohort has been soundly demonstrated in the record.
  • Since 2001, other municipalities in Ulster County have approved and built 534 senior housing units while the City of Kingston has built zero. It is well past time for the City of Kingston to step up and meet the needs of its senior citizens. The rhetoric of opponents that the City of Kingston has “done enough” is simply not factual.
  • In 2009, Ulster County adopted the Three County Housing Assessment Needs Study, executed by an economist and paid for by the Dyson Foundation that stipulated that to meet the affordable housing gap, the City of Kingston would need to build 1005 units of affordable housing by 2020. Since that report was published, the City has only added 55 units of affordable housing.
  • RUPCO has the experience and expertise along with funding commitments to develop, build and adequately staff Landmark Place to safely provide 35 supportive housing units for seniors with special needs along with 31 affordable housing units for seniors of low income.
  • Landmark Place will pay a robust $132,000 recreation fee to the City of Kingston Recreation Department and put the property back on the tax rolls for the first time in its history. The $20-million development will bring tax revenue and jobs to the City during construction and as permanent positions when operating.
  • Landmark Place will save local taxpayer dollars by moving folks out of motel rooms, shelters, and overcrowded boarding homes where local taxpayers are paying up to $100 per night to house them, and alleviate the burden on local hospitals by keeping people housed and supported with regular care.
  • In the end, Landmark Place will accomplish all of the above and provide 66 permanent, healthy, accessible homes to our senior citizens, some with special needs, in a richly designed, well-built, well-staffed campus.

We hope that the will of the People of Kingston and the obligation of our City to serve its seniors and disabled will prevail, and that more people will come out to show their support.

Kevin O’Connor
Chief Executive Officer, RUPCO