Homebuyer education classesHomeownership is a fundamental facet of the American dream. Yet, many people feel that homeownership is unattainable to them, in part because they lack the necessary tools to navigate the process of becoming a homeowner. At RUPCO, we think homeownership can be a reality. Eighty-one families became homeowners in 2016 thanks to RUPCO’s homebuyer education program.

RUPCO provides first-time homebuyer education starting with a free homebuyer orientation workshop. This workshop allows future homebuyers to learn about grants, tools, savings programs and the overall benefits of homeownership.

Ultimately, these workshops answer the essential question that many people who aspire to homeownership ask themselves: “Is homeownership right for me?”

RUPCO’s next homeowner orientation workshops are scheduled for: Wednesday, February 22nd, Monday, March 6th, and Wednesday, March 22nd. They are held twice a month at The Kirkland building, located at 2 Main Street, Kingston, from 6-7pm.

Those interested in attending a free homebuyer orientation session can enroll via our website,  watch an online video orientation series, or call RUPCO’s NeighborWorks HomeOwnership Center (845) 331-9860 to sign up for an orientation class.

AmeriCorps VISTA Member Opening

RUPCO searches for full-time, one-year AmeriCorps VISTA MemberRUPCO was awarded a one-year VISTA (Volunteer in Service to America) member allocation in collaboration with New York State Rural Housing Coalition (RHC). RUPCO is one of 10 housing nonprofits statewide to serve as a subsite host for a valued AmeriCorps VISTA applicant. RUPCO is a member of NYS RHS which is coordinating the VISTA effort among rural housing nonprofits from Albany, Stamford, and Rochester.

“Our VISTA position is for one year and will assist RUPCO’s Communications Department with behind-the-scene capacity-building support,” notes Tara Collins, Director of Communications and Resource Development. “This is a Jack/Jill-of-all-trades position. We will look to our VISTA to help with getting our new data management solution up and running; assisting with event coordination for Celebrate Community and Community Lunch; and providing a wide variety of communications skills sets from social media campaigns to story writing. This position is perfect for the recent graduate or person looking to gain more experience in the field of communications while making an impact on poverty in our community. VISTAs don’t have to know how to do everything, but they will certainly learn a lot about poverty, affordable housing, community wealth building, creative placemaking and communications in the process. ”

Similar to the PeaceCorps, the VISTA experience is designed to place skilled workers with United States-based nonprofits in need of support. AmeriCorps is one of three programs managed by Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCC). The AmeriCorps is a yearlong residential program for 18-24 year olds that focuses on team-based direct service. Nationally, VISTAs tend to be female (81% ), born in 1982 or later (82%), are experienced volunteers (93%), and come from around the country (62% local recruits vs. 38% national).

The RUPCO VISTA member works full time, commits to one year, and must be 18 or older. A VISTA receives a monthly living allowance of $990 per month and qualifies for VISTA health and child care benefits, student loan forgiveness, mileage reimbursement, relocation assistance, personal and sick leave. Interested candidates should sign up through the VISTA website, https://www.vistacampus.gov/how-apply-americorps-vista . The first-round application deadline is February 17, however RUPCO will take resume submissions through March 10 at tcollins@rupco.org. The official VISTA posting for RUPCO can be found online here.

Public Invited to Informal Open House February 18

Landmark Place: a dron'e aerial view of the campusWe’re opening the doors at 300 Flatbush Avenue, Kingston. You’re invited to a free, informal open house on Saturday, February 18 between 10 a.m. and noon.

“People have asked us if they can visit the building,” notes Kevin O’Connor, Chief Executive Officer at RUPCO. “Many have fond memories of working here for the County. We want to show people the potential this site has to carry forward the vision of Kingston’s forefathers, the vision of caring for the most vulnerable populations in our midst. Pending the rezoning to “multifamily,” Landmark Place — an integrated campus of affordable senior and supportive rental housing – is a strategic benefit for both area taxpayers and future residents.”

The day’s agenda includes:

  • Question & Answer rooms about
    • 1st floor: senior and supportive housing with RUPCO Program Services Supervisor Kim Mapes and Senior Care Coordinator Robert Budreau
    • 1st floor: history with SUNY-New Paltz professor Bill Rhoades
    • 3rd floor: development plans with local architect Scott Dutton, Dutton Associates
  • Architectural renderings of the proposed historical building renovation, new construction and campus landscaping
  • Informal guided tours with key RUPCO staff Guy Kempe, Joe Eriole, and Michael D’Arcy
  • Light refreshments served
  • Visitors should park in designated areas in the lower lot
  • The open house will be held rain, snow or shine

“We want our neighbors and curious residents to visit the property in advance of the February 28 public hearing, to ask questions about what Landmark Place proposes,” adds O’Connor. “We’re here to give people an opportunity to hear what RUPCO envisions for the property, to see the architectural renderings created by Dutton Associates, and to tour the building and grounds.” A print piece, The Case for Landmark Place, Landmark Place factsheet, and other supporting materials will be on hand.

“At the request of the City of Kingston Planning Department, and as a courtesy to the public, we are making all relevant materials available on our website, www.rupco.org,” says O’Connor. “We look to put another vacant, underutilized building back on the tax rolls. We’re adding depth to the community by adding services and solutions to City and County residents. The Almshouse has stood strong throughout its history, it will stand stronger as Landmark Place, continuing to fulfill its original mandate – to care for the most at-risk populations in our community.”

RUPCO currently holds an option to purchase the building from Ulster County, pending a rezoning decision by the Kingston Planning Department. A site plan review public hearing is scheduled for Tuesday, February 28 at 6 p.m. at Kingston City Hall, 420 Broadway.

SHNNY Salutes RUPCO’s Supportive Housing Efforts

Rebecca Sauer, Supportive Housing Network of New York | SHNNY.orgRebecca Sauer, Director of Policy and Planning at Supportive Housing Network of New York, issued this statement for the Landmark Place press conference held on February 13, 2017.

Along with the Campaign 4 NY/NY Housing, the Supportive Housing Network of New York has been working for three years to ensure that there are sufficient resources to house the most vulnerable New Yorkers, at a time when more than 80,000 are homeless statewide. We have applauded Governor Cuomo’s commitment to develop 20,000 units of supportive housing over the next 15 years and were pleased when his budget last year included resources to develop the first 6,000 over five years through the Empire State Supportive Housing Initiative (ESSHI). However, the requirement that the appropriation be subject to a Memorandum of Understanding between him, the speaker of the Assembly, and the leader of the Senate, led to unsuccessful negotiations. The full pot of money has not yet been released. Nevertheless, as a result of the tireless advocacy of our partners and members, we were able to secure funding in the amount of $150 million in last year’s budget cycle to fund the first 1,200 units of supportive housing.

RUPCO’s Landmark Place will contain 35 ESSHI units, among the first in the state to be part of this monumental commitment. The historic property will be rehabbed to house seniors, including those that are medically frail, veterans, the chronically homeless and those with mental illness and substance abuse disorders. This development will allow these people the opportunity to rebuild their lives and regain stability. The Network salutes RUPCO on innovative and critically essential work.

Meanwhile, back in Albany we are prepared for another season of budget negotiations. The governor has included $2.5 billion in his budget for an affordable housing plan, including $1 billion for supportive housing over the next five years. While this budget removes the requirement for the MOU, the proposal is still subject to negotiations in the legislature. Along with our partners, we are continuing to push for the release of much-needed funds for supportive housing, be it through the signing of last year’s MOU or through the appropriation of funds in this year’s budget. Organizations like RUPCO, with the buildings they develop and tenants they serve, remind us of why these government policies are so important. We look forward to the successful construction and opening of Landmark Place and the shared work ahead.

RUPCO Pays Taxes

RUPCO pays taxesPaying our fair share is part of the deal. We direct public monies to transform communities and, in return, we pay property taxes on those we own. We are part of the communities we serve, at all levels of interaction. So to answer the question…

Yes, RUPCO pays taxes.

Below is a table outlining taxes paid through 2016:

RUPCO pays taxes

 

In a snapshot, The Kirkland, located at 2 Main Street Kingston has paid over $573,000 in taxes between 2005-2016. In 2015 alone, The Kirkland tax bill is over $55,000 in school, city and county.

The Backstory of The Kirkland article
The Kirkland, corner of Clinton & Main, #KingstonNYThe Daily Freeman recently published an article about The Kirkland. We feel it  helpful for you to have all the facts and access to our original responses which we forwarded to reporter Paul Kirby last Tuesday. We feel the real story about The Kirkland is our delivery of jobs, taxes, community space, and synergistic influences percolating inside one of Kingston’s historic gems. The larger story, of course, is how this small project jumpstarted a transformation that began Uptown and is now seeing it’s way to Midtown.

“It’s been 8 years since we completed the building” notes Kevin O’Connor, Chief Executive Officer. “The rental units and the office space have been rented since Day One but as we all know, the market downturned in 2008. That’s the main reason a restaurant didn’t take hold at The Kirkland. In addition, the capital expense to outfit a commercial-grade kitchen and restaurant fit-up required a new tenant investment of $100k-$200k beyond our investment and that proved problematic. We started marketing the property in 2005 and showed it to several restaurateurs we even used commercial brokers but had no takers. At the time, the location was a little off the beaten path, parking limited, and many opportunities with established commercial kitchens already existed.

“When we started this project, we promised and delivered mixed use space. We cobbled together 17 different funding sources to complete the project including a $1.5M mortgage from Key Bank that RUPCO is paying. In 2010, when we converted our community space at the Stuyvesant, we invested more money to outfit The Kirkland’s Senate Room as new community space. Since 2008, RUPCO has grown from 28 full-time equivalent employees (FTEs) to 65 FTE jobs, including 13 FTEs employees who now work at The Kirkland. Indeed, we’ve created more good paying jobs with benefits than what a restaurant would have delivered.” The Kirkland headquarters RUPCO’s Green Jobs | Green New York Program (GJGNY), a homeowner program designed to improve home energy efficiency through energy audits, weatherization and solar installations. GJGNY leads New York State in homeowner education, energy audits and retrofits, channeling over $5.3-million into the Hudson Valley economy; the program also saves homeowners money on their utility bills.

Originally built in 1899, the Kirkland Hotel fell into disrepair and remained derelict for over 30 years, a blight at uptown Kingston’s entryway. “We helped preserve history and put the 19th-century landmark doomed for demolition back on the tax rolls,” says O’Connor. “ Last year RUPCO paid over $55,000 in school, city and county taxes. Since we took ownership in 2005 and restored this building to its original grandeur – rebuilding the original domed cupola, installing an original wrap-around porch, improving the neighborhood – we’ve paid over $573,000 in taxes.” Winner of Best Historic Preservation Award from Friends of Historic Kingston, The Kirkland remains the gateway icon to Kingston’s Historic Stockade District.

“We hold homebuyer education classes in the Senate Room, which enabled 81 people achieve their dream of homeownership last year,” continues O’Connor. “Another 300 Housing Choice Voucher Program recipients learned about how the program works and what it takes to be good tenant. We also invested $58,000 this past fall, hiring local contractors to rehab and paint the exterior to keep it looking top notch this fall. This building has provided value to Kingston for over 100 years; we continue to do the same into the next 100.” The Kirkland is also home to eight mixed-income rental apartments providing much needed rental housing uptown.

Circle of Friends for the Dying, Ulster County Continuum of Care, twelve-step groups, Friends of Historic Kingston and O+ Festival hold monthly meetings, annual gatherings and diversity workshops here. “Once the central site the Kingston Clinic, Healthcare is a Human Right used the first floor for many years until they switched locations to The Lace Mill to meet the community demand there,” says O’Connor. “Women’s Studio Workshop and Kingston High School art students, NYC-based Center for the Study of White American Culture, Hudson Valley Tech Meet Up and local citizens have also used the space for their events. The Kirkland has consistently met the needs of our neighbors and we’re proud to adapt in ways that benefit our community as times change.”

RUPCO most recently invested in a high-tech audio/visual configuration to answer the community’s call for meeting presentation capabilities. “We continue to reinvest in the building,” says O’Connor. “We are good stewards, pay big taxes and create a large number of jobs! The Kirkland is just one spark to the economic fuel that is driving community wealth building in the Hudson Valley.”

Note: Also misreported in this article were Energy Square facts as well. As of today, possible tenants for the commercial space include Center for Creative Education and Hudson Valley Tech Meet-up; while we would have loved for them to join us on Cedar Street, Ulster County Community Action is not a potential tenant for this space.
Landmark Place Planning Department Materials

Landmark Place aerial site map

On this page, you will find the materials relevant to Landmark Place, as requested by the City of Kingston’s Planning Department in preparation for the February 28 public hearing at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 420 Broadway, Kingston. Links to each document will be available as presented to the Planning Department and Common Council.   (Last updated 2/21/17)

RUPCO receives $1M toward Historic Preservation-Community Wealth Building

The-Metro-Floor-Plan-20170111RUPCO recently received a sizable award from the Empire State Development Grant Program (ESD) through the New York State Consolidated Funding Application (CFA). In early December, RUPCO received notification of a $1-million award for its Priority Status community development proposal to be called “The Metro,” located at 2 South Prospect Street, Kingston, which the Regional Economic Development Council named a “Priority Project.”

“We’re so excited to be a part of the change happening in Kingston,” notes Guy Kempe, Vice President of Community Development at RUPCO. “This CFA round was highly competitive. We’ll direct these funds for acquisition of the property we’ve held on option since August 2016. Overall, we stand amidst a solid CFA tidal wave of funding for the City of Kingston where the city, Ulster County and 4 other organizations won 11 awards amounting to $5.3 million.”

This funding comes on the heels of Governor Cuomo signing into law the New York State Film Tax Credit Program, extending a 40% tax credit to television and film studios working in Ulster County. “These tax credits can now be applied to expenses “below the line” of TV-film budgets where most salaries are accounted for. This tax credit is huge to producers and their budgets but monstrous to Ulster County and City of Kingston,” notes Kevin O’Connor, Chief Executive Officer at RUPCO. “We’re grateful to Ulster County Executive Mike Hein for his work behind the scenes to get this credit extended to Ulster County. With the County’s support and our partnership with Stockade Works, RUPCO will supply the location for TV-film production studios, a post-production & training center plus several Makers’ Spaces for local artisans and light manufacturers. Stockade Works, a nonprofit TV/film production company lead by director-actress Mary Stuart Masterson, will bring new training opportunities and TV-film industry work to the area.” The New York State Film Tax Credit Program, available in all 62 counties, is designed to increase film production and post-production industry activity and secondary economic impact. In 2014, to further incentivize film/TV production outside of New York City, state officials increased the fully refundable tax credit to 40% for shows and films with budgets over $500,000 that are made in 40 upstate counties.

The Metro, formerly the MetLife Building Hall of Records, exterior beforeAccording to a recent press release, StockadeWorks “will provide a co-working environment for industry professionals in the Hudson Valley looking to connect with their colleagues. The space will accommodate outside productions looking to find a film-friendly location. With hot desks, a conference room, event space, production offices, soundstage, picture/visual effects/sound editing suites, 100-seat state-of-the-art screening room, and film/tech-oriented maker space, the project will connect local talent, attract outside production, and provide a training ground with hands-on access to industry professionals. The studio will produce everything from TV shows to mobile apps and podcasts, and host program classes, workshops, screenings, local food and moth-style spoken word events.”

“It’s not just about new jobs in TV and film; it’s about the ancillary economic boost that the TV-film industry brings with it. It brings new people to the area, who visit and then maybe move here permanently,” says O’Connor. “This multiplier effect — the impact of one dollar recirculated among our area’s small businesses like delis, gas stations, Main Street eateries and hotels – benefits our local economy in new ways. Introducing new business opportunity — we call it Community Wealth Building — fortifies our communities by creating what we consume here, keeping local dollars local. Introducing TV-film studio space within an easy commute to New York City is the right thing at the right time. Studios on Long Island and in the City are booked well into 2020. This new creative industry is the economic boost we’ve been waiting for, to restore density to our City center and people to frequent local businesses.”

Adjacent to the local baseball field, the 70,000-square-foot MetLife building will be renamed The Metro. In addition to the TV-film amenities, The Metro will include a number of makers’ spaces for light industrial use. “This effort at The Metro is about creative placemaking, transforming midtown Kingston, improving community where people want to live, work, play, thrive, hang out,” adds O’Connor. “The Metro anchors the transformation that started at the Brush Factory and the arts-based businesses within Midtown. It expanded to The Lace Mill at the far end of Cornell Street and gained legs with the City’s Midtown Arts District. We’re poised to add new construction of mixed-income, mixed-use space at E2: Energy Square at the corner of Cedar and Iwo Jima to provide a home for Center for Creative Education, Hudson Valley Tech Meet Up and 57 families. The Metro extends this transformation to the other end of Midtown, solidifying Kingston’s creative juice throughout the City.”

“We’ve still got our work cut out for us, raising capital to secure historic tax credits and new market tax credits to preserve and renovate The Metro,” adds Kempe. “But we’re confident in the momentum generated by, and support of, the City of Kingston and Mayor Steve Noble, Ulster County and Executive Mike Hein, and area residents who stand ready for pivotal change in Midtown.” Projected improvements include historic preservation in conformance with the standards set by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior standards, such is restoring the building façade to original  architectural plans. Site development will include landscaping and roofing upgrades; energy-efficiency improvements such as a new geo-thermal heating and cooling system; and an interior sub-division of rental spaces. The building lends itself to the maker’s space model: a single-story building with loading bays, easy access, parking and loading capacity, and high-ceilinged spaces ideal for sound stage or light manufacturing uses. Capitalization of these improvements is projected at $11.5-million. RUPCO and StockadeWorks will apply to a combination of resources such as private investors, private mortgage, New Market Tax Credits, Historic Tax Credits, Environmental Protection Fund and ESD funding. The project currently enjoys a “Priority Status” from the Regional Economic Development Council which positions the project favorably to access further state economic development sources.

This project is included in Kingston’s Downtown Revitalization Initiative (DRI) drafted to promote the redevelopment of vacant and distressed properties in midtown, as well as the removal of blight and impediments to revitalization. The adaptive reuse of the MetLife Building was identified as a signature project for DRI funding by The mid-Hudson Regional Council. This initiative will remove neighborhood blight, preserve an historic structure, create jobs and move people from persistent poverty to skilled employment. The location for this project is Census Tract 9521.00 in Ulster County, a “distressed community” which is designated by HUD as a “Qualified Census Tract” (QCT.) A QCT is any census tract in which at least 50 percent of households have an income less than 60 percent of the Average Median Income. In Ulster County as of 2016, this represents a family of 4 less than $45,540.

Creative entrepreneurial commerce exemplifies the neighborhood with area businesses Bailey Pottery, American-Made Monster, R&F Handmade Paints, M&E Manufacturing, Cornell Street Studios, ColorPage, Brush and Shirt Factories leading the charge. RUPCO’s award-winning Lace Mill anchors the midtown movement at one end with 55 homes for artists and their families. At the Ulster Performing Arts Center crossroads of Broadway and Cedar/Cornell Street, new galleries and eateries provide a business base for residents of the proposed net-zero for living mixed-use, mixed-income E2: Energy Square with 57 apartments replacing the defunct bowling alley three blocks from The Metro. Midtown’s transformation blends a mix of housing types with business ventures, historic rehabilitation and new construction of underutilized and blighted properties to revitalize the neighborhood.

RUPCO receives national award for innovative historic rehabilitation financing

Chuck-Snyder-Guy-Kempe-Joe-Eriole-Frank-Paulo-Kevin-O'ConnorFrom a highly distinguished roster of nationally recognized affordable housing developers, RUPCO received the David Reznick Award for Most Advanced Financial Structure Award in early November. Affectionately referred to as “The Timmy’s,” the J. Timothy Anderson Awards for Excellence in Historic Rehabilitation are given annually by the National Housing & Rehabilitation Association (NH&RA), one of the country’s top housing industry groups. RUPCO was also a finalist in two other categories: Best Historic Rehab Utilizing LIHTCs (Low Income Housing Tax Credits) and Best Historic Mill or Factory Rehabilitation.

“To be recognized by the NH&RA and a finalist running with national private and nonprofit developers of this caliber is an honor,” notes Kevin O’Connor, Chief Executive Officer at RUPCO. “As financing diminishes for housing construction for those most in need — seniors, veterans, working families and those requiring supportive housing — we are forced to get creative in our financial partnering. Exploring outside-the-box alternatives allow new home creation like The Lace Mill to fill the vacuum of safe, affordable housing. We’re at a crisis in our communities; seven out of 10 renters are paying more than 50% of their monthly income on housing costs. By finding new ways to finance housing creation, we can come through construction, delivering on the demands of our communities. I credit RUPCO’s Chief Financial Officer, Frank Paulo, for keeping our development team true to cost and managing a fiscal portfolio worthy of this award. We pulled together 18 different finance vehicles totaling $18.9 million to create a true public-private partnership in developing The Lace Mill.”

RUPCO combined investment vehicles such as federal low-income tax credits with syndicator National Equity Fund, New York State Historic Tax Credits, a NYSERDA energy grant, private investment through Morgan Stanley, and a private mortgage with CHASE to meet its funding objectives. “The complexity of this financial structuring combined many sources willing to see RUPCO’s vision of what this vacant building could be and the impact its revitalization could have on the surrounding community,” notes Frank Paulo, RUPCO’s Chief Financial Officer. “Local investors included TD Bank Charitable Foundation, City of Kingston, Central Hudson, Ulster Savings Bank, and RUPCO also contributed to meeting the construction budget. We’re thankful to have national partners like NeighborWorks America, Urban Initiative, and Federal Home Loan Bank, as well as state partners NYSERDA, NYS Housing Finance Agency, and New York Main Street Program. Together we created this historic financing structure.”

The 2016 Timmy winners in 11 categories represented visionaries from California, the District of Columbia, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, and North Carolina. “While The Lace Mill has enjoyed accolades for its design and construction integrity, the recognition of the project’s financial structure by the NH&RA on a national stage speaks directly to the commitment that RUPCO brings to both this project and this community,” notes Chuck Snyder, Director of Construction. “The assembly and administration of multiple funding sources at this level requires determination, knowledge and perseverance that is unparalleled within the development community and is a credit to the work delivered by the RUPCO organization.” Snyder oversaw the construction process at The Lace Mill.

“To be recognized in three separate categories reflecting both the complexity of the financing and the innovation of the project as a whole is a tribute to the expanding breadth of organizations like RUPCO nationwide,” adds Joe Eriole, Vice President of Real Estate Development at RUPO. Eriole and Snyder accepted the award on RUPCO’s behalf at NH&RA’s ceremony in Boston.

According to NH&RA, the federal historic rehabilitation tax credit is a tax incentive used by developers to help finance the renovation of historic buildings of all types for continued use as offices, apartments, hotels, stores, and other purposes. Available nationwide, federal historic tax credits are instrumental in revitalizing urban downtowns as well as suburbs and rural communities. NH&RA created the Timmy Awards in 2005 in memory of J. Timothy Anderson, a Boston architect, educator and preservation advocate. A singular figure in the historic rehabilitation business, Anderson’s legacy includes numerous Boston area projects and a seminal study that helped preserve Miami’s South Beach Art Deco District.

Add This Book to Your Holiday Reading List

earlymarketing-social_crosssectorcollaboration-customCommunity development success stories from around the country are available December 12. The new book, “NeighborWorks Works: Practical Solutions from America’s Community Development Network,” highlights innovative solutions to community development and housing challenges from the NeighborWorks America (NWA) network of local nonprofits. RUPCO is one of 140 organizations featured from the NWA membership.

“We actually have two stories in #OurNWBook,” says Kevin O’Connor, chief executive officer at RUPCO. “The first is about the collaborative nature The Lace Mill and how the community influenced our design and living dynamic there.” The story also includes comment from local photographer Rubi Rose, one of the Lace Mill’s 55 resident-artists and can be found in the “Place-based Investments” section of the book.

“The second story focuses on RUPCO’s energy efficiency program, Green Jobs | Green New York (GJGNY),” adds O’Connor. “We’ve extended specific effort to connect with the Latino community, as many of these families can benefit most from the energy audit and weatherization services.” In the last five years, GJGNY has helped 2409 families in 10 counties with free and low-cost home energy assessments and helped homeowners minimize utility bills through home energy savings recommendations. The monetary impact of this energy-saving work totals over $5.3 million. This story is listed in the section “Affordable Homes.”

RUPCO is a member of the NeighborWorks network—more than 245 nonprofit organizations based in every state, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. The network was founded and is supported by NeighborWorks America, which creates opportunities for people to live in affordable homes, improve their lives and strengthen their communities.  As a member of the NeighborWorks network, RUPCO has been rigorously assessed for high standards of performance and operation. In 2016, RUPCO received “exemplary” status for its performance in five areas. NWA awarded RUPCO chartered member status in 1998 and audits the community developer every three years to ensure the excellence of the network. 

“Community-based nonprofits are creating economic opportunity for more Americans through cross-sector collaborations, complementary investments and collective problem-solving,” says Paul Weech, chief executive officer of NeighborWorks America (NWA). “This book will allow us to share what works, as well as what doesn’t work – an important part of innovation.”

essays inside “NeighborWorks Works: Practical Solutions from America’s Community Development Network” demonstrate how housing can be a platform for advancing health, education, workforce development, and youth leadership. Featured success stories illustrate how to facilitate affordable housing, whether owned or rented; supportive housing for senior citizens or the disabled; engage residents of varying ages, cultures and races; revitalize declining neighborhoods; and measure outcomes. Policymakers at the local and state levels, funders, and journalists will find it a rich source of ideas related to community development trends, challenges, and solutions.

“RUPCO is offering the book as part of our year-end fundraising appeal,” notes O’Connor. “For a donation of $50 or more, you receive NeighborWorks Works; a signed limited edition print “Give Housing a Voice” by local artist Stephen Hargash; and the satisfaction knowing your donation makes home matter here in the Hudson Valley.”

###