Lace Mill resident-artists collaborate, artists receptions, gallery exhibits Aug. 5

Dirty-Laundry-lefttoright-Bisio-Lockhart-Cardenas-CulpepperAn integral part of MADKingston’s First Saturday attractions through the City of Kingston, The Lace Mill hosts three artist receptions this Saturday, August 5 from 5 to 8 p.m. at 165 Cornell Street. Resident-artists at The Lace Mill will collaborate on three distinct shows in three distinct onsite galleries. Artist receptions are free and open to the public this weekend.

The first exhibit titled Dirty Laundry appears in The Lace Mill’s East Gallery and Mezzanine. Resident-artists Dawn Bisio, Dan Cardenas, Chelsea Culpepper, and Aaron Lockhart will be showing their multidisciplinary works, featuring several mobile or suspending pieces, mostly made from fabric, plaster, and other objects sculpted together. Through immersive installation, drawing, and sculpture, Dirty Laundry investigates ways of navigating public and private spaces, personal histories, discreet eccentricities, social taboos, and cultural schisms. “Dirty Laundry is the happy result of a community of artists coming together. I wanted to do a dynamic show about secrets and lies, identity and privacy,” says Dawn Bisio. “As our fraught relationship to privacy continues to evolve, these works are a reflection of our precarious disposition in an increasingly porous world.” Her husband and world-renowned recording artist Michael Bisio will entertain gallery visitors with live bass music that evening. For separate viewings of Dirty Laundry through August 19, contact Dawn Bisio at (845) 616-7133 for more details.

Lace Mill resident-artist James Martin with The Watercolor ExhibitJames Martin, another Lace Mill resident-artist, is curating The Watercolor Exhibit with an opening reception also from 5 to 8 p.m. in The Lace Mill Main Gallery and Boiler Room. The Watercolor Exhibit features some of the region’s best watercolor artists including Claudia Engel, Staats Fasoldt, James Martin, Naoko Oshima, Kazuma Oshita, Susan Silverman, Charlotte Tusch, and Lexi Williams. The group will showcase mixed abstract and realism art. Private viewings of The Watercolor Exhibit are available through August 26; contact James Martin at (347) 387-6874 for more details.

Lace Miller Lexi Williams curates the third show with assistance from neighbor James Martin. Entitled The Yellow Spot Tickle Dot Exhibit, this show’s opening reception is also open from 5 to 8 p.m. in The Lace Mill’s West Gallery. This family affair highlights folk art and photography from Williams, her family, and friends. Martin is thrilled to have all three shows happening at the same time. “Rarely do we have all three galleries used at the same time—I know it’s going to be powerful.” Private viewings of The Yellow Spot Tickle Dot Exhibit are available through August 26; contact James Martin at (347) 387-6874 for more details.

Built in 1903, The US Lace Curtain Mill boasted a long history as a major 20th-century employer and fine lace fabricator. RUPCO purchased the vacant shell, boarded up for the better part of three decades, in December 2013, setting in motion adaptive reuse of the historic building with a vision for creative placemaking. A community block party in August 2016 celebrated the opening of 55 apartments of affordable living preferenced for artists, officially anchoring the City of Kingston’s artistic community at the north end of Cornell Street. In addition to residential space, The Lace Mill shares 8,000 square feet of public gallery space as cultural activity centers open to its residents, local community and visiting public audiences. The Lace Mill has received six prestigious awards for design and historic preservation including Preservation Action’s “Best of 2016” and NYSERDA’s Trailblazer Award for housing the City’s largest solar array (160Kw).

Lace Mill Couple Host Dance Festival Fundraiser on July 23

Bon Dori Dance Festival 2016Youko and Kazuma Yamamoto work together to raise awareness of nuclear energy issues that will ultimately impact the livelihood of future generations. They are hosting a festival, the Bon-Odori Dance Festival for Peace, at Kingston Point Beach on August 6th, 2017 from 1-7pm, (dance at 6:30pm) and they welcome everyone to come and have fun while raising funds for an important cause. What better way to shake off unnecessary usage and preoccupation of nuclear energy than to create good vibes through dancing?

Back to the grim: statistics reveal that over 75,000 people in Nagasaki, and 150,000 in Hiroshima have been killed since the nuclear bombings of each city. And these numbers likely don’t accurately measure the true number of lives taken; many Japanese have the concept of shame attached to physical or mental disabilities, and so they don’t report theirs or their children’s issues in analytical studies.

With nearly 450 reactors worldwide, mostly located along water and even more being constructed in America and China, Youko and Kazuma are concerned that we are cornering ourselves in potentially dangerous conditions, especially if our nuclear energy usage only increases.

Most recently, a nuclear meltdown disaster resulting from a tsunami and earthquake in Fukushima shocked residents and worldwide onlookers, enforcing the anxiety that nuclear energy is valid. Though Youko and Kazuma were involved in anti-nuclear campaigns before, disaster Fukushima sparked a renewed interest in advocacy and led them to ways in which to promote peace and environmental justice.

Youko & Kazuma Yamamato, resident-artists at The Lace MillWhile Youko was at the family restaurant, Gomen-Kudasi located in New Paltz, NY, Livia and Billy of the Vanaver Caravan dance company asked her, “”Youko, do you know ‘Tanko-bushi’?” from the traditional Japanese coal-mining song. While singing, an idea for a dance festival came to mind. “Why not do something locally?” Later tying the idea of her routine spiritual ritual of chanting Buddhism suturas with the impromptu vocal performance, Youko states, “chanting heart sutura is a good practice, but it isn’t so popular, especially among young people. I thought if I transform it as a fun dance festival, it could invite a lot more people to join us to think about those who suffered in the radiation disasters, such as Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Fukushima, Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, and a lot more.” She figured a dance event would bring people together to participate and learn effectively, since there is more power in numbers than there is in individuals trying to make changes.

Youko states that when dancing together, “the best part is, even though it is a Japanese folk dance, it’s simple! Our feelings, heart, and spirit unite and our ancestors are with us… we all feel it together.”

A pre-event fundraiser for Bon-Odori Dance Festival for Peace will be held on July 23rd at Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, from 2-5pm. Preparing for both the fundraiser and the festival is no easy feat. Youko says costs determine what activities and supplies will be undertaken or purchased. “All the money raised will be used to host the event: insurance, fees to the professional helpers and performers, equipment rental (one large tent cost $2,500!), legal fees, printing all promo material including registration packets, cards, posters, programs, banners, road signs. We usually need more than $5,000 total.” Youko hopes to raise $1,500 at the Lace Mill Fundraiser.

What’s the big draw to the June 23rd Lace Mill fundraiser? The food! Youko, a restauranteur, will “prepare amazing, high quality food with my own recipes.” A plethora of Japanese cuisine and the preparation to make the foods will reflect old traditional practices—down to the ice, which will be hand-shaved and put in drinks, including cold brew tea. Cuban jazz music from the 30’s and 40’s will fill the atmosphere with a different flux of energy to add to the cultural celebration.

Bon Dori Dance Festival for Peace, August 6, 2017All are welcome to attend the Lace Mill fundraiser, which will only mark the beginning of a communal resistance effort. The ultimate goal of the fundraiser, festival and subsequent advocacy efforts is, according to Youko and Kazuma, “to see a nuclear free future.” Besides eating delicious food and getting your groove on, the Yamamoto’s suggest taking action as individuals to reduce our carbon footprint and care for the Earth in a more intentional way. The other approach is to lobby against the building of nuclear power plants, since only a small number make large profits from the construction and distribution of nuclear energy, and the losses incurred from pollution and radioactivity emission risk are outsizing the gains. The Yamamoto’s carry on Pete Seeger’s message of having a peaceful world, eventually creating a movement that advances human relationships to each other and to the Earth in a determinedly holistic approach.

Make a donation online here; all contributions benefit the dance festival and the creation of a safe and enjoyable community event.

For more information about the Bon-Odori Dance Festival for Peace, visit BonOdoriKingston on Facebook, and be sure to like, comment, or share the page with your friends!

Contact Sakura Kojima at (845) 255-8811, or email gomenkudasainy@gmail.com for further details.

Couple Find Creativity, Privacy at Lace Mill

Youko & Kazuma Yamamato, resident-artists at The Lace MillBefore living at the Lace Mill, Youko and Kazuma owned a home in Gardiner with scenic views and remote neighbors. Never did they think they would receive housing assistance. But the day came when they could no longer afford to pay their mortgage and keep up with other expenses that piled up quickly. Eventually they found a place that suited their needs, in rural New York. They think living in the Lace Mill community experience helps them to focus their time and energy on their New Paltz restaurant, Gomen-Kudasai, and not on costly house maintenance or routine upkeep.

Rising taxes eventually squeezed the Yamamoto’s out of an affordable living space in NYC. They then moved upstate to Gardiner and began looking for other housing options as they could not afford the mortgage on their restaurant income. Thankfully, their son’s Waldorf School teacher suggested The Lace Mill for local artists. “We got the interview about two weeks later, and fortunately they took us in, and now we are very comfortable,” Youko says.

Youko elaborates that living in Lace Mill provides the same security as does a home without an assistance program. “I feel like it’s our nest right now,” she says. “We know that it is not our final home, but it is our hideout community for us.” The Yamamoto’s have a safe space to lead their own lives and artistically create in privacy.

“I know a lot of artists who don’t have comfortable living,” states Youko. “RUPCO is an excellent resource to utilize, especially for artists who want to continue their work but have limited means to purchase supplies or rent studio spaces.”

Following in good fortune with RUPCO’s help, Kazuma found a workplace in Saugerties in which he is able to continue his metalsmith career. His original studio was in an upstairs workshop in High Falls; residents below would regularly complain of the machinery noise. Now, he uses the space without worry about disrupting neighbors below.

Bon Dori Dance Festival for Peace, August 6, 2017Youko and Kazuma believe in community contribution and welcome opportunity for Lace Mill residents to feel like they are living as part of the real world. Youko and Kazuma believe it is wise to take responsibility for the space they rent, and not fall back on complimentary services to elevate their experience beyond typical means, otherwise complacency and a distorted sense of entitlement may arise. That’s why they’re hosting the Bon Odori Festival on August 6th, as a way to give back to the community.

The Bon-Odori Dance Festival for Peace, and other RUPCO programs fiber offer positive effects. People of modest means and their families contribute much to the community when given the opportunity to live peacefully amongst neighbors. Find out more about the couple’s fundraiser on June 23 and the Bon Dori Dance Festival on August 6.

Independent News & Articles about The Lace Mill & its Resident-artists

 

Group of Lace Mill artists in July 2016The Lace Mill: Resident-artists

Affordable housing advocates say region in desperate need (Charlotte Tusch), Spectrum TV News 6/22/17

James Martin: Inspired By the Old Masters & Kingston’s New MAD Creatives, MADKingston blog 6/20/17

Dreamers & Doers: Frank Waters, community organizer-digital media creator, Lace Mill resident-artist, Kingston Happenings 4/15/17

Capital of Culture: Kingston, Chronogram March 2017 page 30

Spotlight on Filmmakers: Sarah Carlson, Dawn (Wan) Bisio, Rubi Rose, Felix Olivieri, Frank Waters), MADKingston Blog 2017 

Chronogram launches community conversations (first session at The Lace Mill 2/8/17)

Collaborative Catalyst: RUPCO’s Lace Mill, Chronogram February 2017 page 51

The Lace Mill: The Building

 

Lace Mill apartment complex recognized as one ‘Preservation’s Best of 2016’, Daily Freeman 2/28/17

RUPCO Featured in 2016 LISC Annual Report, March 2017

The Lace Mill Revitalizes Midtown Kingston, Hudson Valley Magazine 3/17/17

RUPCO begins survey of Midtown Kingston residents for neighborhood renewal opinions, Daily Freeman 8/20/16

Historic lace factory becomes artist housing, page 10,  Affordable Housing Finance 2015 LIHTC Yearbook, December 2015

RUPCO aims to resolve lead problem in Kingston’s Lace Mill apartments by end of 2015, The Daily Freeman 12/1/15

RUPCO, Lace Mill residents dealing with lead contamination issues, Kingston Times 11/25/15

Artist Housing Helps Revitalize Midtown Kingston, N.Y., Affordable Housing Finance, 10/29/15

Artists find new homes at affordable housing complex in Kingston, Times Herald-Record, 8/14/15

Affordable Housing Needs Local Champion, Times Herald-Record, 7/16/15

Renovation of Kingston Factory – Hudson Valley Week in Review with Amy Greene 2/121/15 (video)

Former Lace Curtain Mill to be transformed into artists’ housing – Hudson Valley News, 2/18/15

Applications Now Being Accepted for Artists’ Housing in Kingston’s Former Lace Curtain Mill — The Daily Freeman, 2/16/15

Conversion of former Lace Curtain Mill on track for completion — The Daily Freeman, 2/15/15 (video)

Conversion of Vacant Kingston Factory into Housing for Artists Gets $412k Grant – The Daily Freeman, 2/3/15

Kingston event heralds start of lace curtain factory renovation (VIDEOS) – Daily Freeman 4/1/14

‘Paint Can Opening’ on April 1 to celebrate the beginning of construction to convert vacant Kingston factory into artists’ housing – Daily Freeman 3/16/14

UNITY: Artists’ Corridor Partners in Collaborative Exhibit

Election Night March 2017 by Leslie Bender

The UNITY show is a partnership of artists from along the Cornell Street corridor — the Shirt Factory, Pajama Factory, Brush Factory, Cornell Street Studios and The Lace Mill — whose works will be exhibited at The Lace Mill’s East Gallery and West Gallery, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston.  The show’s opening reception will be held Saturday, May 6 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Disciplines include painting, sculpture, ceramics, performance, installation, music, and dance, video, puppetry for kids, and sonic meditation. Artwork, like Election Night March 2017 by Leslie Bender, at right will be featured.

A closing reception the following on Saturday, May 13 from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., features live performance-based art such as dance, video and music.

Inspired by the newly launched Midtown Arts District (MAD) last year, Lace Mill community arts liaison Sarah Carlson and Shirt Factory events coordinator Lisa Kelley started discussing the possibilities of joining forces to create a dynamic group show of the buildings’ artists while also supporting the mission and initiatives of MAD.

American Flag by Sarah Carlson

American Flag by Sarah Carlson

Carlson explains, “I wanted to do a show that was about what we have in common, rather than what divides us, and to have that conversation as a community. It seemed sweet to open that dialogue to the arts corridor right here and a nice way for us to dialogue about what’s happening on the local national stage. As artists, that’s what we do.”

Kelley adds, “I love Sarah’s idea for bringing our artists together with the theme of unity.  Over the last year, the Midtown Arts District and Mike Piazza’s artist factory buildings have supported this kind of collaboration between artists.  I believe we’re planting some fertile seeds for exciting partnerships in the future.”

High Water Mark by Nicholas Kahn & Richard Selesnick

High Water Mark by Nicholas Kahn & Richard Selesnick

Nearly two dozen artists will participate in UNITY including:

Leslie Bender
Micah Blumenthal
Stephanie Bonavito
Tania Canteli
Sarah Carlson
Amy Cote
Ray Curran
Joan Ellis
Alexis Feldheim
Rosalie Frankel
Green Palette Community Center
Patrice Heber
Nina Isabelle
Susanna Kearney
Lisa B Kelley
Maki Kurokawa
James Martin
Dan McManus
Diana Seiler
Charlotte Tusch
Frank Waters
Eli Winograd

For more information:
Sarah Carlson at The Lace Mill 917-428-3297
Lisa Barnard Kelley at The Shirt Factory  845-901-0244