Couple Find Creativity, Privacy at Lace Mill

Youko & Kazuma Yamamato, resident-artists at The Lace MillBefore living at the Lace Mill, Youko and Kazuma owned a home in Gardiner with scenic views and remote neighbors. Never did they think they would receive housing assistance. But the day came when they could no longer afford to pay their mortgage and keep up with other expenses that piled up quickly. Eventually they found a place that suited their needs, in rural New York. They think living in the Lace Mill community experience helps them to focus their time and energy on their New Paltz restaurant, Gomen-Kudasai, and not on costly house maintenance or routine upkeep.

Rising taxes eventually squeezed the Yamamoto’s out of an affordable living space in NYC. They then moved upstate to Gardiner and began looking for other housing options as they could not afford the mortgage on their restaurant income. Thankfully, their son’s Waldorf School teacher suggested The Lace Mill for local artists. “We got the interview about two weeks later, and fortunately they took us in, and now we are very comfortable,” Youko says.

Youko elaborates that living in Lace Mill provides the same security as does a home without an assistance program. “I feel like it’s our nest right now,” she says. “We know that it is not our final home, but it is our hideout community for us.” The Yamamoto’s have a safe space to lead their own lives and artistically create in privacy.

“I know a lot of artists who don’t have comfortable living,” states Youko. “RUPCO is an excellent resource to utilize, especially for artists who want to continue their work but have limited means to purchase supplies or rent studio spaces.”

Following in good fortune with RUPCO’s help, Kazuma found a workplace in Saugerties in which he is able to continue his metalsmith career. His original studio was in an upstairs workshop in High Falls; residents below would regularly complain of the machinery noise. Now, he uses the space without worry about disrupting neighbors below.

Bon Dori Dance Festival for Peace, August 6, 2017Youko and Kazuma believe in community contribution and welcome opportunity for Lace Mill residents to feel like they are living as part of the real world. Youko and Kazuma believe it is wise to take responsibility for the space they rent, and not fall back on complimentary services to elevate their experience beyond typical means, otherwise complacency and a distorted sense of entitlement may arise. That’s why they’re hosting the Bon Odori Festival on August 6th, as a way to give back to the community.

The Bon-Odori Dance Festival for Peace, and other RUPCO programs fiber offer positive effects. People of modest means and their families contribute much to the community when given the opportunity to live peacefully amongst neighbors. Find out more about the couple’s fundraiser on June 23 and the Bon Dori Dance Festival on August 6.

Charlotte Tusch

charlotte-tusch-painting-in-her-lace-mill-apartmentEXHIBITION OF WORK: PAINTINGS & JAZZ
November 5 – November 30

Boiler Room Gallery at The Lace Mill
165 Cornell Street, Kingston
First Saturday Artist Reception and Musical Ensemble
November 5, 5-8p.m.

This marks the Lace Mill’s first participation in First Saturday, a monthly event when galleries throughout Kingston have opening receptions with featured artists. Musicians include bassist Michael Bisio and saxophonist Michael Monhart.

“Being self-taught I enjoy the challenge and the exploration of the various mediums that are available to create with. I have always been fascinated by the play of light on nature.

“The modern master Will Barnet was a great inspiration. I knew him well and he mentored me in a way that taught me freedom. Other influences are the color field painters such as Rothko, Kelly, Lewis, and Jenkins, among others. Abstraction has been the direction of my work for decades – I find it honest and perpetually changing, just as we all are.

“The art I create is my attempt to clarify the world I live in. I use a variety of mediums and approaches to my work. I pour, move, and use a pallet knife and brushes to create. The canvas takes on form and color as I work and there is always a sense of mystery. My influences and inspirations are the color field painters such as Rothko, Kelly, Lewis, Jenkins and etc. Abstraction has been the direction of my work for decades; I find it honest and perpetually changing just as we all are. My paintings are molded by the emotional, intellectual and aesthetic experiences of my life. What is conveyed is the integrity of the moment.

I have been a working artist all my life in various mediums and approaches. Early on in my 20’s I did constructions and dioramas where I created small scenarios that pertained to everyday life and the social atmosphere that was present during that time. I showed my work at the Sally Hawkins’ Gallery in Soho, NY and also exhibited throughout NJ where I was living at the time. I became tired of the process and started to free myself by using paint as a vehicle to express feelings in gesture and color. I enjoy the immediate response that I received when I work this way and continue to do so. I found that simplicity, color, line and gesture were enough, and the rest was up to the observer.”headshot of C. Tsuch Scherer

C.T.S painting 1 C.T.S painting 2