Healthcare is a Human Right 2018 Schedule

Healthcare is a Human Right staff & practitionersGet these dates on your calendar!

Healthcare is a Human Right provides free/low-cost alternative modalities from A to Z at its Kingston Clinic held at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, second Thursdays monthly from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Walk-ins are welcome. For appointments or further information, contact Reenie Gordon at 845-481-3186.

2018 Schedule at The Lace Mill:

December 14, 2017
January 11, 2018
February 8
March 8
April 12
May 10
June 14
July 12
August 9
September 13
October 11
November 8
December 13

Additional clinics are offered (and Walk-ins welcomed)

  • First Saturdays in Woodstock at Family of Woodstock, 16 Rock City Road. For appointments or further information, call  845-679-2485
  • First Wednesdays in Phoenicia at Parish Hall, Main Street. For appointments or further information, call Bev at 518-989-6216
“The Davis Show” is a family affair at The Lace Mill November 4

The Davis FamilyJeromy Davis, his fiancée Christa, and their children Jesse, Sebastien and Emmy will drive a family-fueled night of musical and artistic performances called “The Davis Show” on November 4 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston in the Boiler Room Gallery.

Jesse’s sculptures will adorn the galleries and he’ll sing his heart out in solo tunes. Sebastien and Emmy’s crayon drawings will hang on display and entice the young and old to reflect on youth’s artistic vision. Christa will show her paintings as well. Jeromy will play music among handmade barn wood sound-dampening panels and feature guitars he built both as a musical and visual artistic display. Altogether, they will demonstrate family ties in a multi-layered performance. This will be the family’s first solo performance. “There’s something for everybody. I want people to go, ‘wow, this is really nice,”’ says Jeromy.

Free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. Free parking is available on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street. Freewill donations benefit the Lace Mill Arts Council, future shows and exhibits.

True Storytelling Performance with TMI Project at Lace Mill on November 9

Lace Mill image with description in white lettersEveryone has a “TMI” story (the ones they’ve kept a secret because of fear, shame, or embarrassment) that they’ve always wanted to share, but felt couldn’t or shouldn’t. Lace Mill resident-artists will share with their true, personal perspectives uncovered through their three-month writing experience. Readers share their recent writings based on epiphanies and personal revelations, that “Too Much Information” stuff, stories that will inspire, sadden, madden, and enlighten you.

RUPCO, in partnership with TMI Project, invited residents of the Lace Mill, a residence for artists in Kingston, NY, to participate in a 10-week workshop series led by Eva Tenuto and Sari Botton of TMI Project, during which participants could take time to find the story they most need to tell, feel supported telling it in a safe space, be guided to tell it in a way that ensured they will be heard powerfully, release shame and stigma, clear space for new perspectives, and fully embrace their power. Select participants will perform their true stories crafted during the workshop series for each other, the larger RUPCO community and the general public at this performance. This True Storytelling Performance will be held on Thursday, November 9 at 7 p.m. in The Lace Mill’s West Gallery at 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. 

Among those Lace Mill resident-artists performing:

RUPCO and TMI Project began their partnership in 2016 at Park Heights, a senior housing campus in Rosendale. “TMI Project is thrilled to be working with different RUPCO communities,” said Tenuto, TMI Project’s co-founder and executive director. “After struggling to find housing, it’s nice to not only unpack bags and boxes but also the stories that have been carried along the way. In addition to deepening a sense of community at various residences, we hope this partnership helps participants alleviate some of the lingering burdens of the past and clears the space for a happy, healthy home.”

This event is open to the public. Freewilll donations of $5 (or more) will benefit The Lace Mill Art Council and a future TMI Project workshop. Light refreshments will be provided. Free on-street parking is available on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street.

ABOUT TMI PROJECT: TMI Project is a non-profit organization founded by executive director Eva Tenuto and Julie Novak, which offers memoir writing workshops that culminate in performances and/or publication. Through its Community Outreach Initiative, TMI Project brings distinct versions of its workshops to the incarcerated, at-risk teens, cancer patients, survivors of domestic violence, military veterans, LBGTQ teens, and other populations where people don’t often get to tell their stories or be heard. In its workshops, TMI Project workshop leaders help people write well-crafted true stories from their lives, including the “TMI” or “too much information” part they usually leave out because it’s too painful, shameful, or embarrassing. The workshops typically culminate in Moth-style storytelling shows where participants perform their stories for a live audience.

 

Watercolor Demo at The Lace Mill October 19

The Lace Mill resident-artist community opens its doors to the Mezzanine studio to showcase a watercolor demonstration at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. Thursday, October 19 from 6-7p, Hudson Valley watercolorist and Woodstock School of Art instructor Staats Fasoldt shares his mastery of paints and techniques for both new and accomplished artists.

Staats Fasoldt, watercolorist and instructor at Woodstock School of Art

photo courtesy of Woodstock School of Art

This demonstration is open to the public. Freewill donations are encouraged and will benefit The Lace Mill Arts Council, future exhibits, workshops, and demonstrations. For more information, contact James Martin (347) 387-6874.

Demonstration logistics: The Lace Mill’s front door will be open and a greeter will direct you to the Mezzanine studio. Free on-street parking is available on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street. All are welcome to attend.

CANCELLED: 99 Minute Way Seminar

Due to low registration, the instructors have cancelled this seminar for tonight. 

The Lace Mill hosts The 99 Minute Way, a free seminar on basic investing literacy based in long-term investing strategy. The free seminar, scheduled for October 23 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. is open to the public, and will be held in the West Gallery at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. RSVP for your free seat here.

“The 99 Minute Way is NOT a stock picking class, but rather a learning session on how people of modest incomes can make the most of their savings and investments. Seminar leaders are not salespeople looking to sell services,” notes Jennifer Naylor, event coordinator of The 99-Minute Way. “The 99 Minute Way is a personal educational program for sound, long-term investing taught by two investment professionals, Michael Harvey and Phillip Kasofsky. Using established principles, the pair teaches people how to invest on their own, saving money and building capital for life goals. The 99 Minute Way offers clear direction information and support to audiences hungry for guidance on managing their personal investing and on building wealth.”

Attendees will walk away with an understanding of key financial terms and investing concepts, along with actionable direction on opening accounts and directing their investment dollars. “Michael and Phillip are accessible guides whose program has been developed out of epic fails and solid success in investing their own capital,” adds Naylor. “This program runs 99 minutes, and participants are welcome to stay after to ask questions or comment on what they have learned.” This free seminar is open to anyone interested in gaining an understanding of their financial future.

Free childcare will be provided along with light refreshments will be served. A question-and-answer period will follow the lecture. Contact Jennifer Naylor for more information at jennifer@mottspoint.com or call (845) 419-2361.

 

Jazz Masters Perform at Lace Mill on October 8

JazzMasters perform at The Lace Mill on October 8 at 4pThe Lace Mill hosts jazz masters from around the world on Sunday, October 8 at 4 p.m. in The Lace Mill East Gallery, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. The afternoon concert features multiple acts of artistry including rich musical pieces performed by the region’s most talented musicians and performers, as well as on-site, live painting.

Coordinated by Lace Mill resident-musician Michael Bisio, the jazz ensemble promises a concert worthy of the Ulster Performing Arts Center. Iva Bittova brings excellence of voice and violin. Anais Maviel sings as well. Ivo Perelman accompanies on tenor sax, with Michael Bisio on bass. Painter Nancy Ostrovsky will paint during the performance, inspired by onlookers and the musical experience.

Well-established reviewers have this to say about the performance line-up:

“Iva Bittova is an extraordinary artist. Raw and refined, passionate and contained, she has the soul of a gypsy, the voice of a troubadour, and the mind of a genius,” according to NPR’s All Things Considered.

Ms. Maviel, a vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, doesn’t work like a typical singer; her process is so deeply rooted as to be almost subliminal. She seems to throw herself at her notes, as if seeking a sound that might convey pure energetics,” says Giovanni Russonello, The New York Times

“Nancy Ostrovsky is a pioneer of performance painting, an art form that has not yet been embraced by galleries and museums but has earned her a dedicated following nonetheless,” Barbara Pollack writer for The New York Times, Art in America, Artnews and Time Out New York

“Ivo Perelman is perhaps the greatest musical living artist of our time,”@CriticalJazz

“The fleet-fingered and pitch-perfect Bisio ends the piece with an absolutely jaw-dropping solo,” Bill Tilland

Visitors are encouraged to contribute a $10 suggested donation. Parking is located on Manor Avenue and Progress Street. For more information, contact Michael Bisio.

Artwork Inspired by Social Justice Issues focus of Lace Mill Art Exhibit

Lanette Hughes painting abstractOctober is Domestic Violence Awareness Month and coincides with artwork focused on human rights, domestic violence, and world hunger. This is Lanette Hughes’s social activism movement in the form of an art show. This exhibit will take place in all three Lace Mill galleries, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston on October 7 from 3-8 p.m.

Hughes will show 30+ paintings reflecting social issues; all of which, upon their sale, will benefit local organizations that deal with human rights issues. Local nonprofits slated to receive artwork sales include Family of Woodstock, New Paltz, Kingston, Ellenville; the Darmstadt Shelter; Caring Hands Soup Kitchen; Clinton Avenue Methodist Church; MyKingstonKids; O+ Festival; Safe Harbors; and RUPCO. Global organizations include Women in Black and The Haitian People’s Project.

Hughes’ pieces directly relate to real life events. Her abstracts convey deeper messages without being overly explicit. Many pieces depict victims physically harmed, though the paintings don’t graphically portray clear wounds or detailed damage. Each portrayal speaks volumes about issues that are underneath the surface of so many lives — including her own — and nobody would know just by quick observation.

For example, “Human Beings are Not Created for Target Practice” has military undertones. The message conveys a simple thought: if military personnel were stripped of their uniforms, would enemies still shoot them? “Women Running” features women fleeing from human trafficking groups, a worldwide issue that defies ethnicity, gender, and age. Another piece portrays children affected by nerve gassing bundled in blankets; only their faces show, their bodies eerily shrouded mummification-style.

“My hope is that more artists will contribute (to the larger conversation), to include in their work social awareness for change,” says Hughes. “I’d like to see a whole day, week, or month, when artists everywhere do a whole show on a particular social issue.” She also hopes this art show stirs local activism by providing curiosity about what goes on behind the scenes in lives of our acquaintances, co-workers, family, and friends.

Throughout the exhibit’s run, speakers will talk about relevant issues that affect communities. Guy Kempe, Vice President of Community Development at RUPCO, will speak on “Housing, Creative Placemaking, & Community Development” on October 7 at 4:30 p.m. “Aligned with social justice, ‘creative placemaking’ is the proposition that arts and cultural expression, joined with housing, helps to energize community and revitalize disinvested places for minority and disenfranchised populations,” Kempe says. Poet Nancy Smith follows at 6 p.m. with readings from her works that concern human rights.

Filmmaker and veteran Marty Klein will talk about veterans’ issues on October 14, showing his film entitled, “Why Can’t We Serve.”

All artworks are for sale, with 75% of the proceeds donated to organizations that support social justice efforts. The artist retains 25% to cover material expenses associated with making the artwork. Painting prices are negotiable, with no reasonable offer refused. For more information, contact Lace Mill artist-resident Lanette Hughes at (845) 532-3538 or visit her Facebook page LK Hughes.

Lace Mill Artists Join ArtWalk 2017

Kingston ArtWalkArtists from The Lace Mill once again join Kingston’s Art Walk on September 23 from noon to 7 p.m. and on September 24 from noon to 5 p.m. This year’s ArtWalk occupies all three Lace Mill galleries and features artists, presenters, and performers from The Lace Mill and the local community. Visual artists include: Cheryl Crispell, Teena Crispell, Christa Ermer, Friedrich Haas, Lanette Kristin Hughes, James Martin, Michele Miller, Kazuma Oshita, Marie Pierre-Paul, Rubi Rose, Gloria Rumble, Charles Steele, Joshua Stern, Patricia Tyrol, Zelda (aka Judith Z Miller), and special exhibitions by Sarah Carlson and Felix Olivieri.

Poetry and Poety Things includes work from Peter Coates, on koto, Nancy Smith, Tobias Song, Allen Stevo, Amy Westberg, and Chris Wood.

Presentations on various topics include a discussion and slide show photographic tour of Costa Rica shared by Rubi Rose; an update from Daniel Rhinier on his Forgotten Country Music archives and oral history project; The Lace Millers will belt out a favorite medley; and The Four Yorkshiremen may drop by!

On Saturday the 23rd, Music after Art Walk includes performers Sighanide, Dan Sliwa, Jeromy Davis, and Daniel Rhinier: It’s a great bunch of musicians sure to get you dancing or dreaming. or both!

Lastly, Lace Mill artist-residents Charlotte Tusch and Frank Waters host Open Studios, allowing visitors entry to their living/work spaces to see where they work, how they create, and how works progress.

Refreshments served both days. On-street parking is available. For more information, visit www.thelacemill.com and sign up for their event calendar email.

A community block party in August 2016 celebrated the opening of 55 apartments of affordable living preferenced for artists, officially anchoring the City of Kingston’s artistic community at the north end of Cornell Street. In addition to residential space, The Lace Mill shares 8,000 square feet of public gallery space as cultural activity centers open to its residents, local community and visiting public audiences. The Lace Mill has received six prestigious awards for design and historic preservation including Preservation Action’s “Best of 2016” and NYSERDA’s Trailblazer Award for housing the City’s largest solar array (160Kw). Built in 1903, The US Lace Curtain Mill boasted a long history as a major 20th-century employer and fine lace fabricator. RUPCO purchased the vacant shell, boarded up for the better part of three decades, in December 2013, setting in motion adaptive reuse of the historic building with a vision for creative placemaking. For more information, visit www.thelacemill.com.

13 MISFITS shows at The Lace Mill September 2-15

13 MISFITS 13 MISFITS is the newest exhibit featured at The Lace Mill for September 2 through 15 as a runner-up to the subsequent art show, the Arts MidHudson Kingston Art Walk. A mixture of abstract art spanning sculpture, painting, and prints will be on display for two weeks and allow viewers fresh insight to traditional form. Originally entitled, “It Happened One Art Show,” it became “13 MISFITS” after Clark Gable’s last movie to convey the 13 artists who don’t conform to standard art practices or ideals.

13 MISFITS will feature works from nine Lace Mill artists: Daniel Cardenas, Chelsea Culpepper, Aaron Lockhart, Lark Kidder, James Martin, Kazuma Oshita, Felix Olivieri, Charlotte Tusch, and Lexi Williams. Four guest artists from the region — Naoko Oshima, Susan Silverman, Fred Woller, and Jessie Freund – are also featured. The show, aptly titled “13 MISFITS” celebrates the number of artists within the show. Each of them has a sense of quirkiness that also sets them apart in their creative processes.

Lace Mill artist-resident James Martin coordinated and curated the event. He expects a great turnout for such a short timeframe. “I hope we will get a lot of good people who will come First Saturday (a Kingston-wide open art studio night). I hope they will enjoy what they see. I hope they will recognize that we are trying to be a part of our community and to satisfy the community with exceptionally good work.”

The opening artist reception is Saturday, September 2 from 5-8pm in the Main Gallery, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. Contact James Martin for additional information at (347) 387-6874.

Couple Find Creativity, Privacy at Lace Mill

Youko & Kazuma Yamamato, resident-artists at The Lace MillBefore living at the Lace Mill, Youko and Kazuma owned a home in Gardiner with scenic views and remote neighbors. Never did they think they would receive housing assistance. But the day came when they could no longer afford to pay their mortgage and keep up with other expenses that piled up quickly. Eventually they found a place that suited their needs, in rural New York. They think living in the Lace Mill community experience helps them to focus their time and energy on their New Paltz restaurant, Gomen-Kudasai, and not on costly house maintenance or routine upkeep.

Rising taxes eventually squeezed the Yamamoto’s out of an affordable living space in NYC. They then moved upstate to Gardiner and began looking for other housing options as they could not afford the mortgage on their restaurant income. Thankfully, their son’s Waldorf School teacher suggested The Lace Mill for local artists. “We got the interview about two weeks later, and fortunately they took us in, and now we are very comfortable,” Youko says.

Youko elaborates that living in Lace Mill provides the same security as does a home without an assistance program. “I feel like it’s our nest right now,” she says. “We know that it is not our final home, but it is our hideout community for us.” The Yamamoto’s have a safe space to lead their own lives and artistically create in privacy.

“I know a lot of artists who don’t have comfortable living,” states Youko. “RUPCO is an excellent resource to utilize, especially for artists who want to continue their work but have limited means to purchase supplies or rent studio spaces.”

Following in good fortune with RUPCO’s help, Kazuma found a workplace in Saugerties in which he is able to continue his metalsmith career. His original studio was in an upstairs workshop in High Falls; residents below would regularly complain of the machinery noise. Now, he uses the space without worry about disrupting neighbors below.

Bon Dori Dance Festival for Peace, August 6, 2017Youko and Kazuma believe in community contribution and welcome opportunity for Lace Mill residents to feel like they are living as part of the real world. Youko and Kazuma believe it is wise to take responsibility for the space they rent, and not fall back on complimentary services to elevate their experience beyond typical means, otherwise complacency and a distorted sense of entitlement may arise. That’s why they’re hosting the Bon Odori Festival on August 6th, as a way to give back to the community.

The Bon-Odori Dance Festival for Peace, and other RUPCO programs fiber offer positive effects. People of modest means and their families contribute much to the community when given the opportunity to live peacefully amongst neighbors. Find out more about the couple’s fundraiser on June 23 and the Bon Dori Dance Festival on August 6.