Sullivan County Homebuyer Seminar, August 27

The Sullivan County Land Bank (SCLB) and RUPCO can provide Opportunities and Resources that can help!!

Guest speakers:

  • Dickie Baxter & Vinny Reeda from Curasi Realty 
  • Denise Quinn from Mid Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union 

Call 845-331-9860 or email dfnostrand@rupco.org to register today!

FREE Homebuyer Seminar in Sullivan County

Tuesday  August 27, 2019

5:30 – 7:00 PM 

Holiday Mountain Fun Park
The 845 (restaurant)
30 Holiday Mountain Road
Monticello, NY 12701

Homebuyer Seminar in Monticello NY on August 27, 2019 from 5:30-7pm

 

First-time Homebuyer Informational Session , August 21

Ready to buy your first home, but don’t know where to start?

This in-person, hour-long First-time Homebuyer Informational Session outlines the RUPCO HomeOwnership Center’s Homebuyer Program and the path to homeownership.

Call 845-331-9860 or email dfnostrand@rupco.org to register today!

Walk-ins welcome!

Wednesday August 7,2019 / 6-7 pm                                                        

The Kirkland, 2 Main Street, Kingston NY 12401

Credit 101 Workshop, August 7

RUPCO presents a series of FREE Credit 101 Workshops

August 7, 2019
5:30-7:00 pm

The Kirkland Building
2 Main Street
Kingston, NY 12401

This workshop will provide valuable information on important aspects of your credit making it easier to qualify for a mortgage.

Tips will include
•Understanding your credit report
•Improving your credit
•Reducing your monthly debts

Find out how RUPCO programs can help you reach your goals.

REGISTER TODAY!

Sullivan County Homebuyer Seminar, July 23

The Sullivan County Land Bank (SCLB) and RUPCO can provide Opportunities and Resources that can help!!

Call 845-331-9860 or email dfnostrand@rupco.org to register today!

FREE Homebuyer Seminar in Sullivan County

Tuesday  July 23, 2019

5:30 – 7:00 PM 

Village of Liberty
Municipal Building
167 North Main Street
Liberty, NY  12754

 

First-time Homebuyer Informational Session, July 17

Ready to buy your first home, but don’t know where to start?

This in-person, hour-long First-time Homebuyer Informational Session outlines the RUPCO HomeOwnership Center’s Homebuyer Program and the path to homeownership.

Call 845-331-9860 or email dfnostrand@rupco.org to register today!

Walk-ins welcome!

The Kirkland, 2 Main Street, Kingston NY 12401

Flyer showing the Kirkland Building at 2 Main Street in Kingston NY and a group siting around a table for a homebuyer orientation class, promoting a firsttime homebuyer informational session on July 17, 2019 from 6-7 pm to find out how RUPCO can help firsttime homebuyers reach their goal of homeownership

 

One Step Behind

 

Although I’ve never been homeless, it feels like I don’t have a home. All my life, I’ve struggled to find and accept one. To me, a home is a place where you feel content and secure. I’m so close to finding this sanctuary that it pains me, but I’m not there yet. I think that if it weren’t for my troubled childhood, I would be able to find a place to call my own.

Growing up with two alcoholic parents doesn’t exactly set you up for success. I did have a perfect childhood, until my parents split up. After the divorce, my sister and I started living with our mother. This is when her alcoholism truly took control of her life, and ours. We would come home from school not knowing whether or not she would be intoxicated. At eight, I started to become traumatized by her instability and behavioral antics. We were too young to realize what was going on, but this had become our new life. Because of her alcoholism, I was forced to become an adult and take care of her while I raised my sister as well as myself. This life had broken any and all the memories I had of a home. Ten years later, I had a second chance of finding a place to call my own.

When I was eighteen, I moved in with a friend and his family. They accepted me and treat me like their own. I appreciate everything they’ve done for me and am eternally grateful, but even with all their support and love, I can’t help but to hesitate about calling their house my home. The constant tension within the house triggers something within me, making it difficult to relax there. because of the tension, I still return not knowing what I’m coming back to. This instability brings me back to when I was with my mother. They truly try to make me as comfortable as possible, but I’m still stuck in the past.

The closest thing to home I’ve ever had was my dorm at SUNY Geneseo. It was just me and my cat. I had my own space. The major difference was that the dorm was “mine.” I didn’t have to be anxious about what I would come back to. I had a safe space. This fall I will start an intercultural and interpersonal communications degree at SUNY New Paltz. I will once again be dorming and to me that means I’ll have a temporary home. I understand that home is what you make of it, but I just can’t adapt to living with others yet. I think that in order for me to let go of my past, I need to live on my own for the time being.

Home matters to me, as it should to everyone. Although I’m not quite there yet, I believe that my home is out there waiting for me. I’m not sure how I’ll get there, but I know I will. In the end everything works out, I’m just one step behind. 

-Heather Trimboli                                                                                                                                                                           

 

In Support of Veterans…and Landmark Place

American Flag by Sarah Carlson, Lace Mill artistFifty years ago, I was drafted into the United States Army along with thousands of other Americans.  Though I was drafted into the Army, I’m proud of my service to my country. I spent 12 months with the 1st Infantry Division in Vietnam.  When I returned, I took full advantage of the GI Bill to complete my college degrees and advance my education.

After 40 years of working and having a wonderful family with my wife, Valerie, I began to have emotional problems related to my military experience.  For 10 years, I have been going to the VA Clinic in Kingston and the VA Hospital in Albany. With the help of the Ulster County Veterans Service Agency and the great support of people I know in Kingston, I find myself lucky compared to most veterans I meet. My medical condition is not good presently, partially related to my exposure to Agent Orange. For many years I went to consultations with the Veterans Service Agency at the Alms House (soon to be Landmark Place), which is now being considered for low-income housing by RUPCO.

Many times I had asked, “Where in Kingston or Ulster County are there apartments or living areas for Veterans?”  I was told the closest one is in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. After speaking with RUPCO about this, I learned that if the Alms House is used by RUPCO, 10 apartments will be made available to veterans.  I think this is a good idea, and I know there is a controversy, but it’s the first time I’ve heard that any housing would be made available to consider Veterans in Kingston or Ulster County. Something tangible and realistic could be done for homeless veterans.  Many need a place to live. Very few are loved.

Dennis Connors, Kingston NY

Artwork by Sarah Carlson, Lace Mill resident
RUPCO Welcomes Kelsey Vargas to Program Services

Kelsey Vargas, L.M.S.W of Port Ewen joins the RUPCO staff as Program Services Supervisor and leads a staff of four who conduct direct case management at RUPCO via six offerings. Vargas, who joined the RUPCO team in April 2019, oversees all client outreach and community support to clients living at RUPCO properties or receiving services from RUPCO caseworkers. RUPCO’s five program services include:

HOPWA (Housing Opportunities for People with AIDs) assists families with housing support and connections to different supportive resources in Ulster and Dutchess Counties.

NYSHP (New York State Supportive Housing Program) connects one case manager with Stuyvesant residents and the supportive services they need; the case manager makes personal connections with each resident, many of which don’t have family or people to check in on them.

EAP (Emergency Assistance Program) provides security or back rent support payments to families to prevent homelessness. Families are not necessarily RUPCO clients or residents. Funding for that from United Way, The Bruderhof, and other sources. In 2018, RUPCO helped 48 families with nearly $50,000 to keep children and their parents housed. In 2019, 10 families have been helped so far.

STEPH (Solutions to End Homelessness Program) is similar to EAP, and provides housing and support to families experiencing homelessness with young children. This program ends in December 2019.

“We’re also in partnership with Bridges of New York in Newburgh at East End Apartments, a scattered site program for veterans, homeless, and at-risk youth,” notes Vargas. Bridges provides connections to support services that these populations need and are entitled to receive, but may not know it, services that can make life easier, less stressful. “My goal with program service is to grow the professional mental health services we provide, stronger community resources, stronger community partnerships, and wider professional mental health network that we can draw from. I support the mental health aspect, which will grow as we open up Energy Square and Landmark Place. Hudson Valley mental health services are not far-reaching and there is opportunity for RUPCO to provide that life-support right through our programs and residential living.”

“Kelsey is highly educated, but her people skills and ability to connect with those she is interacting with has most impressed me,” notes Sheila Kilpatrick, Vice President of Operations at RUPCO. “She is compassionate, caring, and conveys a sincere appreciation for the needs of our clients.  She is exactly what RUPCO needs to help us grow our support services programming.”

Vargas comes to RUPCO as a bi-lingual clinical social worker by trade. By education, she received her undergraduate degree from Quinnipiac College and completed her Masters of Social Work at University of Pennsylvania. “My license allows me latitude in making resident recommendations,” notes Vargas. “If I see a client needs additional assistance, I can refer that resident to the health professional needed.” Many residents are elderly, disabled, veterans, at-risk youth, or have a substance abuse or mental health diagnosis.

“I’ve always been interested in working with minority demographics, education access; health access to programs inspires me,” she continues. “Take a minute to think of mental health and home: if you don’t have a home, you can’t focus on any other aspect of your life. If you worry about where you are laying your head every night, you aren’t able to focus on your wellness, your medications. Your security is at risk, things don’t have a place. Once you’re situated, you’re home, you’re safe. Once housed, we can work with residents to address their routines, give life meaning, and set goals for integrating with family and our community.“

Recently married and Harry Potter fan, Vargas lives in Port Ewen with her husband and two dogs, Hagrid and Minerva.

Art Students League at The Lace Mill, July 6-28

ABOVE: Inside the Art Students League sculpture studio in NYC; Oil on canvas by Keith Gunderson

Lace Mill Arts Presents
The Spirit of The Art Students League
July 6-28

Opening Reception July 6, 5-9pm

Artwork: Inside the Art Students League sculpture studio in NYC; Oil on canvas by Keith Gunderson

July show to feature works by
Gertrude Abramson
John Balsamo
Les Castellanos
Montserrat Daubon
Ron DeNitto
Freya DeNitto
John Vetter Doyle
Staats Fasoldt
Rosalie Frankel
Mark Kevin Gonzales
Sam Goodsell
Tor Gudmundsen
Keith Gunderson
Janet Gunderson
Ariel Higgins
Anki King
Gregg Kreutz
Steve Mader
Angelo Mariano
Yuko Mariano
James Martin
Marsha Massih
Marie Mastronardo
Wilma Miller
Vincent Natale
Karen O’Neil
Tomomi Ono
Naoko Oshima
Kazuma Oshita
Anita Pearl
Richard Pantell
Gail Postal
James Renzie Prater
Robin Smith
John A. Varriano
Steve E. Walker
Karen Whitman
Bernard Zalon
and more…

There’s an old French Renaissance style building that stands between Broadway and 7th Avenue in New York City. It’s called The Art Students League of New York and schooled many of the greatest artists of our time – such as William Merrit Chase, George Bellows, Georgia O’Keefe, Norman Rockwell, Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko to name but a few who studied and taught there. And in Woodstock, NY, The Art Students League had its satellite campus from 1906 to 1979, later to become the Woodstock School of Art.

The spirit of The Art Students League in both schools is continuous and undeniable since its founding in 1875 to this very day. I had the honor of studying and working in both The Art Students League and The Woodstock School of Art and painted beside many of the established artists, instructors, and emerging artists that both schools have produced and are presented here in this very special exhibition. As a curator for the Lace Mill Galleries, I am again honored to present The Spirit of The Art Students League, works from painters, printmakers, and sculptors associated with both schools currently and as far back as the 1950’s. The spirit continues. — James Martin, Curator

Long-time Rural LISC Partner RUPCO, Inc. will host more than 250 rural community development experts during the 2019 Rural LISC Annual Seminar June 4-7 in Monticello, New York. RUPCO will highlight their affordable housing and economic development projects, showcasing best practices in bringing opportunity to America’s rural areas.

“RUPCO is one of our truly outstanding Rural LISC partners,” said LISC Vice President and Rural LISC Director Suzanne Anarde. “Their innovative and ‘outside the box’ efforts in affordable housing and economic development over many years have brought numerous impactful opportunities to Kingston and the neighboring Hudson River Valley, and we are honored to showcase RUPCO’s outcomes on their own turf, so that our network of rural partners can see their remarkable efforts directly.”

“As the LISC conference co-host, we’re eager to share with our peers the community development projects we’ve furthered here in the Hudson Valley,” said RUPCO CEO Kevin O’Connor. “On June 6, RUPCO is leading a bus tour with over 250 people to visit The Lace Mill, The Metro and Energy Square in Kingston; Newburgh Progress and key properties recently funded by Governor Cuomo’s Affordable Housing initiative; and Woodstock Commons, the intergenerational campus for seniors, artists, and working families. We’re proud to highlight the region, our partners and community impact. The opportunity to share and dialogue about our collaborative work in housing and community development has always been at the heart of why being a member of Rural LISC is so important.”

One of the stops on the Seminar tour, The Lace Mill, is a former manufacturing site repurposed to artist housing. The United States Lace Curtain Mills in Kingston once thrummed with industry, employing hundreds of workers and fueling life in Kingston and the surrounding area. But with deindustrialization, Kingston has suffered population loss and disinvestment for the better part of a century, and the 1903 brick building had been boarded up and largely abandoned for decades.

Now, the old factory building has come back to life with a new purpose. Conceived as both a housing complex and an economic development engine, the $18-million project is coming into its own as a center of cultural and economic activity as well as providing affordable housing for the Hudson River Valley’s burgeoning arts community. The Lace Mill houses 55 affordable rental units, all home to artists, with several gallery spaces, work studios and sculpture gardens. Other amenities include state-of-the-art thermal heating and cooling, solar panels on the roof and energy-efficient lighting.

Rural LISC supported the Lace Mill project with more than $10 million in equity from LISC’s affiliate, the National Equity Fund, which included federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, federal historic tax credits and New York State historic tax credits. LISC also provided $45,500 in grants for predevelopment, capacity building, and arts and culture related development. A creative placemaking grant through LISC also supported the salary for a “community animator” who helps The Lace Mill to be self-governing and publicizes the arts and educational events to the larger community.

According to Kingston residents and the developers of the project, The Lace Mill has already had a profound impact on wellbeing in the Midtown district of Kingston, by sparking more tourism and inspiring galleries and restaurants to open in nearby vacant buildings. RUPCO conducted a survey in 2016 that showed dramatic improvements in the local area. As Guy Kempe, RUPCO’s vice president of community development, said, “Residents and visitors now recognize Midtown as a good community to live in.”

ABOUT RURAL LISC
Launched in 1995, Rural LISC is the rural component of the largest community development support organization in the country, called LISC (Local Initiatives Support Corporation). For 24 years, Rural LISC has partnered with rural communities, helping to forge innovative solutions that lead to prosperity and opportunity. Rural LISC’s investments in rural America have totaled $1.25 billion in grants, equity and low-cost loan funds. Rural LISC has leveraged this investment resulting in $3.3 billion from public and private sources, to produce 35,000 affordable homes and apartments, create 4 million square feet of commercial and community space, assist 700 businesses, create 12,000 jobs and support 20 early childhood centers. By generating resources and investing in the grassroots efforts of its 89 partner community-based organizations, Rural LISC is committed to making rural communities good places to live, work, do business and raise children. Learn more at www.lisc.org/rural.

ABOUT RUPCO
RUPCO creates homes, supports people, and improves communities across a broad spectrum of community development solutions including housing, historic preservation, and neighborhood revitalization in the Hudson Valley. RUPCO creates and maintains quality, sustainable housing and rental opportunities, inspiring understanding and acceptance of affordable housing initiatives, and championing pathways to opportunity. RUPCO is focused to deliver over $100 million in real estate development over the next 24 months including three prominent historic preservation developments: Landmark Place supportive senior housing), The Metro (community wealth building), and Newburgh Progress (community development). RUPCO’s historic preservation work has been most recently recognized with its development of East End Apartments (2019 Preservation League of NYS Excellence in Historic Preservation Award). Other award-winning developments include The Lace Mill (2016), The Kirkland (2009), The Stuyvesant (1993). Along with its real estate development arm, RUPCO possesses a stable and diversified business model with additional impact arenas in property management, resident program services, rental assistance, and homebuyer education. RUPCO currently owns/manages 23 developments on behalf of 700 residents in 588 apartments. Through rental assistance and the Housing Choice Voucher Program, nearly 2000 families, seniors and the disabled are living in safe, affordable homes in Greene and Ulster Counties. RUPCO’s HomeOwnership Center helps over 100 people each year achieve their dreams of homeownership. The HOC works with municipalities to deliver Community Development Block Grants and with homeowners on rehabs and accessibility modifications. It also provides similar homebuyer and homeowner services through its subsidiary holding, Orange County RDAC. Established in 1981, and a NeighborWorks America chartered member since 1999, RUPCO ushers community wealth-building opportunities, much-needed housing, and strong strategic partnerships into communities eager for change. RUPCO’s community development is Building for Everyone, impacting the lives of over 8500 Hudson Valley residents each day. For more information, visit www.rupco.org