RUPCO Home Repair Grant Informational Meeting, May 9

This public meeting will provide information on the new Ulster County Community Development Block Grant that will be administered by RUPCO on behalf of the County of Ulster for repairs to eligible owner occupied homes in Ulster County (excluding the city of Kingston).

We will also discuss other programs if available.

Bring your questions as we be fielding those after the presentation.

May 9, 2019
5:30-6:30 pm

RUPCO Kirkland Building, main floor training room)
2 Main Street, Kingston NY 12401

Register here!

OR Call 845-331-9860 or email dfnostrand@rupco.org to register today!

Sullivan County First-time Homebuyer Informational Session, April 23

Want to buy a home in Sullivan County?

Learn about first time homebuyer resources to help you purchase your first home!!

Tuesday  April 23, 2019  

5:30 – 7:00 PM

Sullivan County Government Center : 100  North Street , Monticello NY 12701

Register Here!

 

OR Call 845-331-9860 or email dfnostrand@rupco.org to register today!

 

 

First-time Homebuyer Informational Session , April 17

Ready to buy your first home, but don’t know where to start?

This in-person, hour-long First-time Homebuyer Informational Session outlines the RUPCO HomeOwnership Center’s Homebuyer Program and the path to homeownership.

Call 845-331-9860 or email dfnostrand@rupco.org to register today!

Walk-ins welcome!

The Kirkland, 2 Main Street, Kingston NY 12401

WOMAN: A Group Show at The Lace Mill, April 6-27

WOMAN-LaceMill-April6-27Lace Mill resident-artist Lanette Hughes curates a group show of over 20 local artists – WOMAN – at The Lace Mill Galleries, April 6 through 27. 

On April 6 (First Saturday), WOMAN holds an opening reception from 3p-9p. Meet the artists, view their art, and enjoy a variety of entertainment including:
5p Poetry & Readings
6p Zelda’s Happening
7p Performance Art
8p Participatory Drumming

Light refreshments served. All are welcome. Free and open to the public. On-street parking on South Manor Avenue, Prospect and Cornell Streets. Freewill donations accepted at the door benefit The Lace Mill Arts Council and future showings.

The Color of Law, April 30

Color of Law invitationJoin us in the Milstein Auditorium at the historic Franklin D. Roosevelt Library & Museum for a conversation addressing housing equity, wealth, segregation, and public policy. 

Author Richard Rothstein shares his perspective from his research and book, The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America. A panel of national and regional thought leaders follows; a book-signing wine & cheese reception ends the evening.

Tickets cost $25, or $50 with an author-autographed book

Sponsorships are available now through March 31.

Agenda for Tuesday April 30, 2019 2 – 6:30 p.m.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Richard Rothstein is a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. He lives in California, where is a Fellow of the Haas Institute at the University of California–Berkeley.

Racial segregation characterizes every metropolitan area in the U.S. and bears responsibility for our most serious social and economic problems – it corrupts our criminal justice system, exacerbates economic inequality, and produces large academic gaps between white and African American schoolchildren. We’ve taken no serious steps to desegregate neighborhoods, however, because we are hobbled by a national myth that residential segregation is de facto—the result of private discrimination or personal choices that do not violate constitutional rights. The Color of Law demonstrates, however, that residential segregation was created by racially explicit and unconstitutional government policy in the mid-twentieth century that openly subsidized whites-only suburbanization in which African Americans were prohibited from participating. Only after learning the history of this policy can we be prepared to undertake the national conversation necessary to remedy our unconstitutional racial landscape.

Richard Rothstein’s book, The Color of Law, published in 2017, is subtitled “A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America.” In his book, Rothstein lays out the systemic discrimination embedded in the policies of our federal government, largely commencing with Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal programs that created de jure segregation. Chief among these New Deal measures was the creation of the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) in 1934, largely to insure bank mortgages. The FHA Underwriting Manual, first issued in 1935, contained a “whites only” requirement and the following language: “If a neighborhood is to retain stability it is necessary that properties shall continue to be occupied by the same social and racial classes.” In 1944, FDR created the Veteran’s Administration (VA) to serve the returning WWII veterans. The VA would provide many services including making mortgages to returning vets. The VA adopted the FHA Underwriting Manual. Officially codified in the federal government, racial discrimination in homeownership and public housing became the law of the land.

For many of us in the non-profit housing sector, the book was a revelation and a conundrum – how much of this forgotten history did we know? If we didn’t know it as well as we should, then surely our colleagues working in government, the private and non-profit sectors, didn’t either. Still today, the effects of these federal policies are widespread and endemic. The resulting disparity in homeownership rates was a key factor in wealth inequality that developed in America throughout the 20th Century. The median net worth of whites typically averages over ten times the net worth for Blacks or Hispanics and much of this inequality stems from federal discriminatory housing policy. According to the Pew Research Center, the variance was 13x greater in 2013 as the median net worth for Whites was $141,000 compared to Blacks at $11,000.

 

Donate 2018

Thank you for making “Home” a reality for over 8,000 people throughout the Hudson Valley. 

Together, we’re Building for Everyone. 

Your donation today helps create homes, support people and improve communities in 2019.  Your Building for Everyone Gift invests in our community’s future and affects our most vulnerable neighbors: seniors, people with special needs, veterans, and working families. Making “Home” a reality for one person changes the course of that person’s life…people like James, Harold, Youko and Kazuma.

Join us in making real change in 2019 by Building for Everyone — creating homes, supporting people and improving communities. Invest in our community today by donating what you can — $25, $100, $500 or more!  Your gift this year genuinely impacts people’s daily lives right here in the Hudson Valley. Every gift counts – no matter what the amount – towards making “Home” a reality for one person.  Imagine what we can do together to impact the lives of 8,000!

Your Building for Everyone donation:

  • Ensures critically needed senior and supportive services that allow people to live independently
  • Fortifies the Emergency Assistance Funding that connects families with one-time assistance for utility payments, rent and security deposits, thus pro-actively preventing homelessness
  • Extends instruction via Financial Capabilities and Foreclosure Prevention programs that empower family finance decision-making
  • Provides guidance through RUPCO’s First-time Homebuyer Education Program which inspired over 600 people to begin the process; 102 of them became first-time homebuyers and achieved their Dreams of HomeOwnership
  • Spearheads ambitious community development solutions like
    • Energy Square: a Net-Zero-for-Living mixed-use complex in Kingston
    • East End: Newly renovated apartments in Newburgh’s historic district
    • Landmark Place: Affordable senior housing with support services for many in Kingston
    • The Metro: A film & TV technology hub in partnership with Stockade Works, surrounded by other creative, community wealth-building entrepreneurs at the center of Kingston’s Midtown Arts District

DONATE ONLINE (this button takes you to the PayPal site but you do not need a PayPal account. Simply select the “Credit card option” in the grey box)

CALL BY PHONE with your credit card (845) 331-2140 ext.276
MAIL A CHECK to RUPCO,  Attn: Annual Appeal 2018, 289 Fair Street,  Kingston, NY 12401
Have a question? Call or email Tara Collins (845) 331-2140, ext. 276.

After you’ve made your donation, go online to our Facebook | RUPCOTwitter or Instagram account and post your #UNselfie – THANK YOU!

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Rural LISC Annual Seminar June 4-7, 2019
We’re co-hosting the 2019 Rural LISC Annual Seminar Save the Date: Rural LISC Annual Seminar June 4-7, 2019with LISC (Local Initiatives Support Corporation) to be held June 4-7, 2019, at Resorts World Catskills in Monticello, NY.  Rural community development practitioners from across the nation will convene to share best practices, learn about new developments in the field, network and collectively dialogue on critical issues facing small communities in rural America.  The seminar agenda and presentation materials will be posted here closer to the date. 

As part of that conference, attendees will take a bus tour of RUPCO properties throughout the Hudson Valley including The Lace Mill, The Metro, Landmark Place, The Kirkland and Stuyvesant, Energy Square, Newburgh’s historic East End and  others. We’re honored to bring over 250 people to the region to experience the Catskills and to see  our  innovative efforts in regional community development.

The Gift of Home
red toothbrush in frosted cup attached to lime green tile wall with white groutHeather Free knows what it’s like to be homeless. Employed full-time in the Human Services industry, Heather worked closely with those needing supportive services. A college graduate with a Master’s degree in Fine Arts, she is an accomplished violinist, mother of two, and blogger. However, a series of events — car accident, adverse medication reaction, a fiance’s cold feet, loss of insurance and then her job — put Heather on the other side of the Human Services table.

As a homeless single mom, she did what was best and sent her daughter to live with her father. She struggled to get well, both mentally and physically, while living nearly a year out of her handbag, sleeping on friends’ sofas or living room floors; one time, she slept under a bush behind a convenience store. “I couldn’t get the help I needed and I knew how the system works,” she said. “Homelessness is a full-time job. There are no hobbies when you’re homeless: there’s no thriving, just surviving.” She posted her plight online and so began a social media chain reaction that put Heather in touch with Property Manager, Tasyka DeRosalia. With a stroke of luck, Heather was housed within a week. 

While homeless, Heather traveled with her toothbrush in a Ziploc baggie, stashed consistently in her purse. No matter where she slept, she kept a simple routine: wake up, brush teeth, start day, hold onto hope, navigate homelessness. Two weeks after moving  into her apartment, she searched her handbag for the Ziploc’d toothbrush. Nothing. Frantically, she emptied the bag and then retraced her steps.

She found it…right where it’s supposed to be…in her bathroom toothbrush stand. She knew then she was home. The gift of Home offers peace of mind, reliability, safety, and security. A toothbrush in its place is why Home Matters.

Healthcare is a Human Right 2018 Schedule
Healthcare is a Human Right staff & practitionersGet these dates on your calendar!

Healthcare is a Human Right provides free/low-cost alternative modalities from A to Z at its Kingston Clinic held at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, second Thursdays monthly from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Walk-ins are welcome. For appointments or further information, contact Reenie Gordon at 845-481-3186.

2018 Schedule at The Lace Mill:

December 14, 2017
January 11, 2018
February 8
March 8
April 12
May 10
June 14
July 12
August 9
September 13
October 11
November 8
December 13

Additional clinics are offered (and Walk-ins welcomed)

  • First Saturdays in Woodstock at Family of Woodstock, 16 Rock City Road. For appointments or further information, call  845-679-2485
  • First Wednesdays in Phoenicia at Parish Hall, Main Street. For appointments or further information, call Bev at 518-989-6216
Local Artist Finds Solace in Lace Mill, Continues Artistic Journey Despite Setbacks
Lace Mill resident-artist Dawn BisioDawn Bisio’s home environment is stable now, but that was not always the case just two years ago. Recently divorced and motivated to redirect her life path, she moved to the Hudson Valley from Westchester, coincidentally at the same time RUPCO announced a call for artists to #WhereArtistsLive. After financial upset with divorce legal fees, she found opportunity at The Lace Mill to be the silver lining in turbulent times.

“The Lace Mill has been motivating for me artistically and the creative community has helped me feel secure and supported, and turned around the worst times,” she remembers.

However, landing an apartment wasn’t straightforward. At first, she missed the first lottery round of new tenants. But she stayed within the area, stayed positive, and reflected on possibilities that might arise if an applicant dropped out or didn’t follow through with a lease. So she waited, and checked in with RUPCO from time to time. Luckily, during RUPCO’s second lottery wave for the newly finished East end—which was under final construction—she got the call. Ecstatic, she agreed to move in and start fresh in her career and home life. She now shares memories with fellow tenants who moved in the same time she did, and they bond over communal living quirks and resident building meet-ups.

Besides sharing the trickle-down effects of administrative check-ins and construction work during the renovation period, Bisio shares other fond thoughts of residents at Lace Mill. “I run into people who are truly fascinating, kind and supporting, and if we [my husband and I] were out by ourselves, we would feel isolated and lonely sometimes—here we can have a glass of wine outside with people we live with, and that’s really nice to have.”

Of course, there are periods when communal living is a bit overwhelming, and Bisio states she sometimes “just needs to retreat and find my own source of peace. I personally like peace and quiet, but I wouldn’t trade this living.” She finds serenity in her own company when she is not spending time collaborating on art shows or conversing with neighbors.

The outside world beckons her attention in between these solitary times for exploration and discovery. “Shapes, people outdoors, moments of reflection, and also things that happen to me personally,” provide sparks of insight into subjective reasoning.

In the larger social domain, things that may not make sense immediately are great catalysts for creative energy. The mystery is what may be alluring to contemplate, like an unsolved riddle that provides more questions than solutions. Bisio notes that maybe things—and people—can convey interesting truths to examine without making sense. “I always try to find a way to process things, especially things that I can’t figure out. Art and writing helps translate experiences or questions, and leads me to an answer—not the answer—but it helps me to make sense of the world and to create things of beauty.”

Allowing herself to branch out is also a large part of being inspired. She finds that while she is toning down on writing, she is able to explore other art forms that clue in on aspects of herself that weren’t revealed before. A recent piece entitled “Mobile Home,” made of a globe that is evocative of the Sun, explores her identity being a Korean adoptee. Another piece featured in the upcoming Dirty Laundry exhibit is a mixed-media work on a canvas box that opens up and allows viewers to see “inside her dreams,” which are written in text on a tree background. Many of her pieces are a result of abstract ideas that echo memories, and are difficult to convey in the real world.

“A lot of my pieces involve construction, and part of the challenge is knowing ‘how do I suspend it correctly, what materials do and don’t work, and how do I translate the pure idea into a work of art?’”

Though home is “like a base,” the foundation that promises security while figuring out the mechanics of her ideas, she hopes to travel in the near future, and have Lace Mill as a part-time home. But with Kingston’s arts district on the rise, she may have incentive to stay here and develop further. “It’s exciting to see where we are going. People are doing all sorts of events: kids events, different workshops, and Midtown Kingston’s growing arts district, so in 10 years from now, who knows what will be happening.”

For now, Bisio continues to shine her light in The Lace Mill gallery, displaying works that reflect her background and experience. Her pieces are testaments to what she has seen and felt, and the light she often utilizes in her works parallel the beauty and strength in her journey of self-knowledge.

Getting to a place of comfort and acceptance isn’t always easy. Bisio has been criticized for being an artist, a general stereotype and stigma still surround the “artistic” label. Those labels — lazy, disorganized, scattered — weigh on her confidence. Instead of focusing on the negative that would drain her livelihood, she states, “I think it’s best to be true to yourself—you have to do what inspires you and not be influenced by other’s opinions. People will think differently about what’s good and bad. So just do the work, no matter how slow the process, even if it’s just one step a day.”

Applying to and inquiring about The Lace Mill proved to be winning leaps in a lottery draw of applicants, and her current endeavors in participating at gallery exhibits are antecedents for growth in a supportive setting—who knows where these little steps will take her next.