“Musica Poetica” Jazz Concert on June 16 at The Lace Mill

Resident-artist Michael Bisio and fellow musicians Ingrid Sertso, Karl Berger, and Alvaro Domene come together to present “Musica Poetica” at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell St., on June 16, from 4pm-6pm. Listen to experts perform beautiful jazz for a live audience in an intimate setting.

From well-established reviewers:

On Ingrid Sertso: “The most uncontaminated voice I ever heard. She screams without screaming.” — OmetteColeman

On Karl Berger: “There is a zen likespirit that transcends genre. Serenity on a shiny silver disc.” –Criticaljazz.com

On Alvaro Domene: “…Alvaro Domene’s virtuosic playing and compositional sagacity make him one of the most exciting performers in the creative music scene…” –M. Caratti, Jazzwise Magazine

On Michael Bisio: “…a poet of the contrabass.” –E. Chagas tomajazz.com

For more information, e-mail Michael Bisio at bisio@earthlink.net or read his artist profile page on RUPCO‘s site.

Suggested donation is $10 and covers expenses incurred by traveling artists.

Free and open to the public.

Guest parking on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street.

Homebuyer Informational Session, June 20

Homebuyer informational session flyer for June 20 6 p.m. at The Kirkland, 2 Main Street, Kingston Tired of paying rent to someone else?

Wondering if YOU can own your own home

Ready to invest in your own future but don’t know where to start? 

Come to our Homebuyer Informational Session!
Wednesday, June 20
6-7 p.m.
Cost: FREE
The Kirkland, 2 Main Street, Kingston

Find out how RUPCO can help you reach your goal of homeownership.

All questions answered!

On-street parking or free after-hours parking in the Ulster County municipal lot next door.  

Please RSVP with Daniela (845) 331-9860  or by email to dfnostrand@rupco.org

The Gift of Home

red toothbrush in frosted cup attached to lime green tile wall with white groutHeather Free knows what it’s like to be homeless. Employed full-time in the Human Services industry, Heather worked closely with those needing supportive services. A college graduate with a Master’s degree in Fine Arts, she is an accomplished violinist, mother of two, and blogger. However, a series of events — car accident, adverse medication reaction, a fiance’s cold feet, loss of insurance and then her job — put Heather on the other side of the Human Services table.

As a homeless single mom, she did what was best and sent her daughter to live with her father. She struggled to get well, both mentally and physically, while living nearly a year out of her handbag, sleeping on friends’ sofas or living room floors; one time, she slept under a bush behind a convenience store. “I couldn’t get the help I needed and I knew how the system works,” she said. “Homelessness is a full-time job. There are no hobbies when you’re homeless: there’s no thriving, just surviving.” She posted her plight online and so began a social media chain reaction that put Heather in touch with Property Manager, Tasyka DeRosalia. With a stroke of luck, Heather was housed within a week. 

While homeless, Heather traveled with her toothbrush in a Ziploc baggie, stashed consistently in her purse. No matter where she slept, she kept a simple routine: wake up, brush teeth, start day, hold onto hope, navigate homelessness. Two weeks after moving  into her apartment, she searched her handbag for the Ziploc’d toothbrush. Nothing. Frantically, she emptied the bag and then retraced her steps.

She found it…right where it’s supposed to be…in her bathroom toothbrush stand. She knew then she was home. The gift of Home offers peace of mind, reliability, safety, and security. A toothbrush in its place is why Home Matters.

MyKingstonKids Fest: Land of Chocolate at The Lace Mill

MyKingstonKids Fest 2018 is an annual free indoor/outdoor event created to provide children of the Kingston area an eclectic experience to enjoy themselves through exciting activities, interactive & educational tools, engaging, fun-loving events and appropriate entertainment. MyKingstonKids Fest will take place at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell St., Kingston, from 11:00- 4:00pm on May 19. The event will host a variety of activities including a children’s art show, music, performances, tea party, arts & crafts, games and more. The event is projected to gather 700 – 1,000 people throughout the day.

This is the second year and third installment of the Kids Festival with an accumulated following of over 1,500 attendees to date. The events have been known for signature attractions and child friendly themes. This well-structured, highly focused, youth generated extravaganza will make it possible for children of all ages to do the following:

• Play and interact with children of all cultures and backgrounds within the Kingston & Hudson Valley community
• Build and practice pertinent life skills such as sharing, attentive listening and following directions to the best of their ability
• Learn new crafts and skills from some of the most talented workshop instructors in our area
• Display their talents and skills thru numerous outlets including but not limited to the Kids Fest art show, live performances and the abundant activities throughout.

Event Organizer

MyKingstonKids.com is the brain child of two award winning entrepreneurs and Lace Mill residents, Shaniqua & Frank Waters. The website was created for parents within the Kingston area that felt there should be an exclusive online resource center dedicated to children that would help parents find upcoming events, activities, classes and ideas. The group also offers programs, events and activities. MyKingstonKids.com is in association with Kingston Candy Bar, RUPCO & The Lace Mill Art Council.

The MyKingstonKids organization has become a community brand known for outstanding organizing, professionalism, new ideas and fun. The group has captured the attention of over 200 members, participated in numerous community events, a weekly Saturday morning radio show on Radio Kingston and even has its own mascot, “Poppy the Panda”.

For more info please contact Frank Waters, 845-282-0182, or e-mail fwaters@mykingstonkids.com.

Making the Pieces Fit: Landlord Education Session

RUPCO is hosting an informational session, Making the Pieces Fit, for landlords interested in learning about RUPCO’s Housing Choice Voucher Program on June 8 at The Kirkland Hotel, 2 Main St, Kingston. The first session runs 10am to noon with a repeat second meetup from 3pm-5pm. Topics include:

  • who is eligible for Housing Choice Voucher
  • landlord responsibilities
  • Housing Quality Standard inspections
  • Housing Assistance Payment Contract (HAP)
  • and more.

Light refreshments will be served.

On-street or municipal lot parking available.

Landlords attending the session will be entered into a raffle to win a $100 gift card to The Home Depot. One gift card will be raffled at each session.

RSVP Vanessa Secore 845-331-2140 ext. 209 vsecore@rupco.org

RUPCO fulfills its commitment to purchase property from County agency

Landmark Place, drone view, rendering of both buildingsLocal community developer continues with plans to deliver on vital needs of local community and senior residents.

Regional community developer RUPCO became the proud owner of the former Kingston Almshouse, located at 300 Flatbush Avenue, Kingston. The purchase fulfills RUPCO’s commitment and intent to purchase the property from Ulster County’s Economic Development Alliance (UCEDA), as RUPCO continues the process towards local approvals for the creation of Landmark Place, a senior apartment development on the nearly 15 acre site proposed by RUPCO to address the vital needs of the community.

“We have honored our commitment spelled out in the Agreement for the Purchase and Sale of Real Property that we signed with UCEDA in September 2016 to acquire the property for $950,000,” notes Kevin O’Connor, Chief Executive Officer at RUPCO. “At RUPCO, we believe that there are vital interests for the City of Kingston to meet including the regional need for affordable housing. Across the County, we see Cities moving in similar ways to create affordable and supportive housing for the growing tsunami of the elderly population that is occurring due to the aging of the baby boomers.”

Once open, the campus at Landmark Place will bring the following benefits to the community:

  • 66 studio and one bedroom, permanent rental apartments
  • Affordable and supportive housing strictly for seniors, age 55 and over
  • Local property taxes paid for the first time since 1874
  • $186,000 in one-time recreational fees paid to the City’s Recreation Department
  • An estimated 50 construction jobs and 10 permanent jobs

RUPCO hopes to advance its site plan review work with the City of Kingston Planning Board next month. In line with the building’s historic purposes, RUPCO is repurposing the Kingston City Almshouse at 300 Flatbush Avenue, to create a senior-living campus called Landmark Place. The historic building will contain 34 apartments – a mix of studios and one bedroom apartments – and a new residential building designed by local architect Scott Dutton is proposed to offer 32 one-bedroom apartments. All apartments will serve seniors, age 55 and over; 35 apartments will offer supportive services for special needs populations including a minimum of seven apartments dedicated to the frail or and disabled elderly.  “We’re ready to continue the process towards making safe, affordable homes for our elders including Vietnam era veterans who helped make Kingston what it is today. Landmark Place marks the first affordable housing for seniors in Kingston since 2001 when Brigham Center on O’Neill Street was built,” adds O’Connor.

Landmark Place will help to meet the critical demand for affordable rental housing identified by the Three County Regional Housing Needs Assessment adopted by Ulster County in 2009. This assessment demonstrated that by the year 2020, Kingston’s Renter Affordability Gap and Total Demand would be 6,931 units and it called for the building of over 1,000 new affordable rental units to help meet the demand. “Since that study was published, only 55 affordable units at the Lace Mill have been built in Kingston,” said O’Connor. “It also answers Governor Cuomo’s call for permanent supportive housing to serve our vulnerable populations including frail and disabled seniors, veterans and other homeless individuals.

RUPCO’s application to the National Registers of Historic Places, on behalf of the City of Kingston and Ulster County, was approved in February and officially added the City’s first civic building, built in the mid-19th century, to the list of State and Federal historic lists of sites worthy of preservation.  “Our nomination of the Kingston City Almshouse was recommended and advanced to the National Park Service for consideration and approved by both the State Historic Preservation Officer and National Park Service Keeper of the Register,” explains Guy Kempe, Vice President of Community Development at RUPCO. “Our request is a win for historic preservation in a city and region known for its historic value. Thanks to all who contributed to the first step towards preservation of this historic structure for future generations.”

For more information about Landmark Place, RUPCO’s plans for senior housing, and architect Scott Dutton’s design overview, visit RUPCO’s YouTube Page and Landmark Place Playlist.

Jazz Entertainment Spectaculars at Lace Mill April 21

A jazz concert on Saturday, April 21 at 4:00pm as part of the ever-evolving Saturday jazz series concerts, held at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell St, East Gallery, will feature a variety of musical talents to entertain. The Lace Mill resident-artist Michael Bisio plays the bass; Julia Donnaruma , vocals; Walter Donnaruma , keyboard; Adam Siegel , alto; Harvey Sorgen , drums.
 
From well-established reviewers:
 
“…what sold the song here was Donnaruma’s alluring performance. A weekly regular on the Café Capriccio stage, the second-generation performer has presence and control most singers her age only read about in books.”
 
 
Bisio says of working with Donnaruma, “Julia’s phrasing embodies the best of the past, present, and future. I hear Ms. Holiday, Washington, Jones, Barber, Wilson and always Julia Donnaruma.”
 
 
A $10 suggested donation will cover expenses incurred by traveling musicians.
Free and open to the public.
Free available parking located on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street
For more information, visit the lacemill.com or e-mail bisio@earthlink.net .
There’s no Place Like Home

Dorothy was right, there is no place like Home. For most, when you hear the word “Home” there is a strong feeling of nostalgia attached. Family is typically the main association and with that comes a sense of familiarity, security, love, trust and care.

When I think of Home, I remember baking cookies with my mom, throwing a baseball back and forth with my dad, completing homework at the kitchen  able and playing with my siblings and neighborhood friends.

When I was in school, I could not wait for the final bell to ring that meant I could go Home. Home was always the place I could be my most authentic self. At school, I was very quiet and shy. Though I was engaged in many school activities, I kept to myself and had only a few close friends. However, once Home, I had no reservations. Home was the place I felt most comfortable. If I felt excited, I could show it. If I needed to cry, I could let it out. There was no judgement or expectation behind those walls. My family and I, shared our most raw and honest versions of ourselves.

My Home was where my heart was. I carried Home with me as I formed my individuality there.

For me, my image of Home is a happy one. For others it can be a painful. But no matter the personal experience, the expectation for a Home comprises a sense of ownership, identity and self-hood. It was not until I went away to college that I realized what Home really was for me. As a teenager I craved small freedoms and new experiences; but once I received them I began to rethink what I wanted. Transitioning to a new living accommodation – a dorm suite that lacks privacy and familiarity – was especially difficult. A wonderful and trans-formative experience for many students, college living begins when you receive the keys to your “Home” on campus: a 15 x 15 space equipped with a complete stranger. Over the next nine months, I learned to make the best of my situation and space. With a roommate, you can find either a friend or a foe in your dorm room. In my college living experiences with roommates, I found that my dorm could either be a space I wanted to be in one or one I could not be away from enough. On campus, the disconnect between ‘housing’ and ‘home’ really came into focus.

I experienced homesickness to its fullest extent during my first few years of college. “Homesick” is a term many college students are accustomed to. By definition, the word homesick describes “a longing for one’s home during a period of absence from it.” With calls home to Mom and Dad, once, twice or three times a day, I counted down the days to vacation and longed for a comfortable night’s sleep in a bed that did not feel like a nail coffin.

Over time I became used to the dorm, the space, the roommates. I learned to live within those quarters without letting it take away from my overall great college experience. Nevertheless, I never considered my college room ‘Home’ because it lacked everything that made my family’s house the place I felt most comfortable, accepted and loved. I got past dorm life and now rent an apartment of my own. And, while I do love my apartment and the space and privacy it provides, it still does not have the same warmth and comfort I was lucky enough to have growing up. I understand it is a part of life to outgrow my Home, even if my family reassures me that I am always welcome to come back. The next course in life lies in finding what makes my house feel like a Home again. I know it can never the same, but I can learn to love this new place just as much. No Home is perfect, but those small fallibilities make each Home and family unit unique. At the end of the day, I see Home nurturing positive outcomes in my physical and mental health, education, employment, and relationships.

Home Matters because it is the place where I spend most of my time outside work or school. Home matters because it is the place that allows me to be the most honest version of myself. Home is where we start from. It is where we grow and thrive. But most importantly, home matters because it is the place you can be yourself with no inhibitions, to experience and share love, and be loved just for that.

Emily Humphrey is a 2018 SUNY New Paltz graduate majoring in Sociology and recently moved to a new apartment to call Home.

Que Será, Será (Whatever Will Be, Will Be)” At The Lace Mill
 

Lace Mill resident artist Zelda (aka Judith Z. Miller) presents “Que Será, Será (Whatever Will Be, Will Be),” A Life Journey: My Experience of Sexual Orientation & Gender Expression. This talk and slide presentation, (a work in progress), chronicles the joys and challenges of navigating non-binary Queerness from childhood in the 1950’s to adulthood. The 30-minute presentation will be at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Wednesdays at 5:30 pm and Saturdays at 1 & 2 pm through the month of April at the Lace Mill. The presentation is part of and in response to the MEN show currently at the Lace Mill.

Zelda talks about her inspiration to create the presentation: “I knew I had to participate in the MEN show to share my own life story to turn those quintessential/iconic male and limiting images upside down!”
 
At the opening of “Que Será, Será (Whatever Will Be, Will Be),” Kevin O’Connor, RUPCO’s CEO, who also attended the TMI workshop performance sponsored by RUPCO at the Lace Mill, remarked: “I just think that there are going to be people in the audience who are going to hear themselves and see themselves in your story — and I just encourage you to keep going.”
 
 Presentation Dates: Wednesdays, April 11, 18, 25 at 5:30 pm; Saturdays, April 14, 21, 28 at 1 & 2 pm
 
Free and open to the public.
 
Donations are accepted to support recovery efforts in Puerto Rico:
 
 
Free available parking located on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street.
 
For more information, visit https://bit.ly/2HnDEGi
Credit 101 Workshop

CREDIT 101 WORKSHOP FLYERWhether your are improving your credit score to buy a home, removeingoutstanding debt in a rational way, or simply bolsterng your financial wellness by taking a look at your finances, the Credit 101 Workshop is for you.

Join us  Thursday, April 26, from 5:30-7 p.m. at The Kirkland, 2 Main Street  Kingston for this  free workshop. sposored by Citizens Bank and hosted by RUPCO. 

On-street parking is available or park within the Ulster County municipal lot next door.  Refreshments will be served; bring a friend and get financially fit together!

Sponsored by

 

RSVP to Daniela by phone 845-331-9860
or email dfnostrand@rupco.org