The Lace Mill Presents 1st Saturday Art Exhibit MEN: A Men’s Art Show

Men: A Men’s Art Show opens Saturday, April 7 with an opening reception from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. at The Lace Mill Main and West Galleries. Displayed paintings and sculptures are designed to present a positive side of the often chided gender. In a time when bad men are rightfully exposed left and right for their unspeakable behaviors, innocent men are callously being thrown into the mix. The rest of men are advised to stay quiet and listen. A group of 11 local male and female artists decided to have a men’s show in response to the silence and stigmatization. Related statements from each artist will accompany the visual art.

MEN: A Men’s Art Show curated by Lace Mill resident-artist James Martin will feature works from artists Zelda aka Judith Z. miller, Les Castellanos, Chris Seubert, Marie Mastronardo, Lanette Kristin Hughes, Naoko Oshima, Steve Mulvey, Rubi Rose, Charles Steele, Autumn Pond, and Fred Woller with music by The Turn Ups.

Men: A Men’s Show will run from April 7 through April 27 in the West and Main Galleries. Gallery hours are Wednesdays and Saturdays, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.and are located at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street in Kingston.

Free and open to the public. Freewill donations graciously accepted and benefit The Lace Mill Arts Council. All artwork is available for purchase. Guest parking available on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street. For more information, contact James Martin tcfishingcompany@aol.com

Hope Through Activism: Lanette Hughes Inspires Through Artwork

Standing outside The Lace Mill, wearing over-sized black sunglasses, talking to a neighbor, Lanette Hughes appears nondescript. A cordial, “Hi, how are you?” to a stranger, she resumes her conversation. You would never guess she churned her tragedy into art in a profound way. A first-hand experience with domestic violence, her identity stolen and her savings robbed from her, these life-lesson setbacks made her willpower stronger. Lanette Hughes is not only a survivor, but a thriver — and her artwork embodies her understated vigor.

Hughe’s parents introduced her to situations at an early age that called for toughening up. They lived in Europe withinin target sites of WWII battle and concentration camp zones. While transitioning between countries, she found it difficult to reconcile that she had friends from opposing countries post-wartime. Her parent’s trip to Dachau further fragmented her sense of peace. The air-raid rubble and abandoned buildings that littered some streets haunted her as a child, a terror still raw when she thinks back.

Recently, Hughes channeled that experience into her artwork, “Human Beings are Not Created for Target Practice.” The large canvas oil painting highlights military personnel . If stripped of their uniforms, would they have reason to shoot the enemy? Hughes bears no bias towards “good” and “bad” sides where nationalism incurs.

She is, however, partial to beautiful art. While living in Germany, Hughes remembers trekking down to monasteries and playing nearby. One day while climbing a wall enclosure surrounding St. Michaelsberg, she fell and hurt herself. Monks brought her in, and she was introduced to wondrous sculpture and paintings within. Inspired, she asked her parents to hire a governess educate her in classical art training and illumination found in religious texts.

Being a sensitive artist and a newcomer whenever her parents moved, she stood out from the crowd. Coming to the United States, she was sorely misunderstood for her European values and mannerisms. She was often bullied and put down, and over time, these experiences impacted her artwork.

She was a target again a few years back, after she returned from a trip to Florida to find her identity stolen. Her home, savings, and future fell through her hands. Hughes became homeless, living out of her car, where she slept and traveled for weeks in Woodstock. She refused to give up her dog when Social Services prompted her to do so, so she could receive a no-pets hotel room. Deprived of everything else, she wasn’t relinquishing her four-footed companion.

Hughes kept her spirits up and applied to housing assistance programs in the local area that would allow dogs. At the time, RUPCO was accepting applications for The Lace Mill for artists. She applied to the lottery  and the patterns of the universe aligned with her needs. “In the miracle of miracles, I got RUPCO housing. And I love it here—every day I thank my creator for this fabulous place and all the friends I have made.”

Hughes realizes that others don’t have it as good. At her last exhibition, held at The Lace Mill in October 2017, Hughes combined her activism with her art show, and made a stand for something larger than making money. She created 50 pieces for sale, where 75% of proceeds benefited local charities. One of her paintings benefited the Haitian People’s Project to provide meals for afflicted families. Consistently without food, Haitian parents often feed their children “mud cakes.” These look like pies, but made of mud, and eating them causes malnutrition and infection. Hughes wants to help in her way, through her art and social activism.

Hughes is proud to live in an apartment where she knows her efforts are supported. She’s made many connections to Kingston nonprofits and continues to support human rights in the way she knows best. Her influence has already been felt among the community; one man started to cry when he saw one of her paintings regarding domestic violence. “’This happened to me, and I’ve never told anybody,’” Hughes recalls. “It really touched him. He didn’t say whether it happened to him, his mother, wife or girlfriend, but it happened to him somehow.”

Her paintings possess an understated emotional impact. She doesn’t wish people to turn aghast, but she wants her visual to resonate with them. She wants people to know that there is awareness, that others have been through similar situations, and the often misunderstood pain — maybe portrayed as endless swirls or spirals in her abstract work — is normal and valid. She connects to her audience on a personal level. “I don’t like the word authentic, but I try to be sincere about who I am. I’ve been through things and I try to relate that to other people.”

Maybe malnutrition, abuse, or trauma has robbed a person of identity, and they use public facades to hide the pain. By recognizing themselves in her work, a part of them is resurrected and recognized. Maybe it will take years to fix, with in-between years of denial. But something clicked, and that is what activism is all about.

Hughes has changed her perspective on earning a living and being an artist. “I don’t need as much as I thought I needed to make me happy. I’m happy with or without. But the fact that I can paint whatever I want is an incredible blessing. And because I live here, I can do that.”

“The Davis Show” is a family affair at The Lace Mill November 4

The Davis FamilyJeromy Davis, his fiancée Christa, and their children Jesse, Sebastien and Emmy will drive a family-fueled night of musical and artistic performances called “The Davis Show” on November 4 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston in the Boiler Room Gallery.

Jesse’s sculptures will adorn the galleries and he’ll sing his heart out in solo tunes. Sebastien and Emmy’s crayon drawings will hang on display and entice the young and old to reflect on youth’s artistic vision. Christa will show her paintings as well. Jeromy will play music among handmade barn wood sound-dampening panels and feature guitars he built both as a musical and visual artistic display. Altogether, they will demonstrate family ties in a multi-layered performance. This will be the family’s first solo performance. “There’s something for everybody. I want people to go, ‘wow, this is really nice,”’ says Jeromy.

Free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. Free parking is available on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street. Freewill donations benefit the Lace Mill Arts Council, future shows and exhibits.

Charlotte Tusch

charlotte-tusch-painting-in-her-lace-mill-apartmentEXHIBITION OF WORK: PAINTINGS & JAZZ
November 5 – November 30

Boiler Room Gallery at The Lace Mill
165 Cornell Street, Kingston
First Saturday Artist Reception and Musical Ensemble
November 5, 5-8p.m.

This marks the Lace Mill’s first participation in First Saturday, a monthly event when galleries throughout Kingston have opening receptions with featured artists. Musicians include bassist Michael Bisio and saxophonist Michael Monhart.

“Being self-taught I enjoy the challenge and the exploration of the various mediums that are available to create with. I have always been fascinated by the play of light on nature.

“The modern master Will Barnet was a great inspiration. I knew him well and he mentored me in a way that taught me freedom. Other influences are the color field painters such as Rothko, Kelly, Lewis, and Jenkins, among others. Abstraction has been the direction of my work for decades – I find it honest and perpetually changing, just as we all are.

“The art I create is my attempt to clarify the world I live in. I use a variety of mediums and approaches to my work. I pour, move, and use a pallet knife and brushes to create. The canvas takes on form and color as I work and there is always a sense of mystery. My influences and inspirations are the color field painters such as Rothko, Kelly, Lewis, Jenkins and etc. Abstraction has been the direction of my work for decades; I find it honest and perpetually changing just as we all are. My paintings are molded by the emotional, intellectual and aesthetic experiences of my life. What is conveyed is the integrity of the moment.

I have been a working artist all my life in various mediums and approaches. Early on in my 20’s I did constructions and dioramas where I created small scenarios that pertained to everyday life and the social atmosphere that was present during that time. I showed my work at the Sally Hawkins’ Gallery in Soho, NY and also exhibited throughout NJ where I was living at the time. I became tired of the process and started to free myself by using paint as a vehicle to express feelings in gesture and color. I enjoy the immediate response that I received when I work this way and continue to do so. I found that simplicity, color, line and gesture were enough, and the rest was up to the observer.”headshot of C. Tsuch Scherer

C.T.S painting 1 C.T.S painting 2