A Midsummer Night’s Art Show at The Lace Mill, July 7-28

flyer for Midsummer NIght's Art ShowFirst Saturday at The Lace Mill Arts presents A Midsummer Night’s Art Show, curated by James Martin, with an opening reception on July 7 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The show runs through July 28 in The Lace Mill West, East, and Main galleries. Come celebrate 3 years since artists began moving into The Lace Mill. Twenty-one great local artists — including Daniel Cardenas, Cheryl Chrispell, Chelsea Culpepper, Faya DeNitto, Ron DeNitto, Chris Gonyea, Lanette Kristin Hughes, Aaron Lockhart, James Martin, Star Nigro, Felix Olivieri, Katie Olson, Naoko Oshima, Kazuma Oshita, Autumn Pond, Rubi Rose, Susan Silverman, Charles Steele, Pablo Shine, Charlotte Tusch, and Fred Woller – share their work under a waning midsummer night’s crescent moon.

Live music and excellent gourmet food and drink for all guests prepared by culinary expert Joseph Fitzgerald and Japanese cuisine by chef Youko Yamamoto. In the Main Gallery back studio, experience Tanabata Japanese paper folding to support the Bon-Odori Festival in August. Stop in for great art, great music, and great food! Donations accepted at the door to cover show and artist travel expenses. Free parking on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street. Regular gallery times Wednesday and Saturday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

For more information, call (347) 387-6874.

Tannery Brook’s Forgotten History March 3 Saturday at The Lace Mill

 Emily Vail and Jiamin Chen will show “Fragmented & Forgotten: Tracing the Tannery Brook” in The Lace Mill’s East Gallery at 165 Cornell Street, Kingston, NY. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, March 3 from 5-8 PM, as part of Kingston’s First Saturday gallery openings. The exhibit will be on display March 3 through March 25. Original maps of the Tannery Brook, paired with historic maps, images, and text, will visualize changes in and around the stream over time.

The Tannery Brook is a small stream in Kingston. The brook flows out of the Twin Ponds, travels downhill along Linderman Avenue, crosses under Washington Avenue, skirts property lines between Washington Avenue and Green Street, and then vanishes beneath the parking lot behind the Ulster County Family Court building. It makes the rest of its journey underground, in a pipe, until it meets the Esopus Creek behind Kingston Plaza.

Although the Tannery Brook has worked hard for Kingston over the centuries – including powering mills, irrigating crops, and carrying away waste – it has been increasingly fragmented and forgotten. It hasn’t been forgotten by everyone, though; it continues to make its presence known through flooding, infrastructure failure, and other damage.

The Tannery Brook is a microcosm of the ways that we perceive and manage water in cities. Its history and present state can provide context for modern stream and urban water management, as we ask: What should we expect from a stream with such a long history of use? How can this history relate to future restoration projects?

With these questions in mind, Emily Vail and Jiamin Chen trace the Tannery Brook’s history from colonial settlement in the 1650s through today using historic maps, historic images, local history narratives, newspaper articles, and other original documents.

About Emily Vail:

Emily Vail is a graduate student at Cornell University in the field of Natural Resources. Since 2010, Emily has worked at the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation’s Hudson River Estuary Program , in collaboration with the NYS Water Resources Institute at Cornell University . She supports community-based watershed groups, municipalities, and other partners as they work to improve water quality in the Hudson Valley. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies from Vassar College . Emily also organizes Uptown Swing Kingston, a monthly night of hot jazz, dance, and swing, and directs the Uptown Lowdown vintage jazz dance troupe.

 

About Jiamin Chen:

Jiamin Chen is a graduate landscape architecture student from Cornell University . Originally from Vancouver, Canada, she has a bachelor’s degree in environmental design from the University of British Columbia . She worked as a landscape designer on various municipal and governmental projects across many parts of Asia including China, Malaysia, Qatar and Myanmar. She returned to graduate school in pursuit of professional licensure, and her work as a graduate research assistant has taken her to various parts of upstate New York and this year, to Kingston. In her spare time, she is a passionate botanical artist, a houseplant collector and an avid traveler.

This work is supported by the NYS Water Resources Institute at Cornell University and the Hudson River Estuary Program of the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation , with support from the NYS Environmental Protection Fund .

For more information, contact Emily Vail at eev22@cornell.edu .

ABOUT THE LACE MILL : A community block party in August 2016 celebrated the opening of 55 apartments of affordable living preferenced for artists, officially anchoring the City of Kingston’s artistic community at the north end of Cornell Street. In addition to residential space, The Lace Mill shares 8,000 square feet of public gallery space as cultural activity centers open to its residents, local community and visiting public audiences. The Lace Mill has received six prestigious awards for design and historic preservation including Preservation Action’s “Best of 2016” and NYSERDA’s Trailblazer Award for housing the City’s largest solar array (160Kw). Built in 1903, The US Lace Curtain Mill boasted a long history as a major 20th-century employer and fine lace fabricator. RUPCO purchased the vacant shell, boarded up for the better part of three decades, in December 2013, setting in motion adaptive reuse of the historic building with a vision for creative placemaking. For more information, visit www.thelacemill.com .

ABOUT RUPCO : RUPCO, affordable housing advocate and innovative community developer in the Hudson Valley, is a charter member of NeighborWorks America, a national network of 245 housing and community development change agents. RUPCO affects the lives of over 8,000 people through its work with homelessness, rental assistance, foreclosure prevention, first-time homebuyers, home rehabilitation, energy efficiency and real estate development. RUPCO connects nearly 2000 families, over 800 landlords and rental assistance through the NYS Home and Community Renewal and Housing Choice Voucher Program. RUPCO currently owns/manages 16 properties with 411 apartments providing homes to over 560 people. The majority of those residents represent our community’s most vulnerable populations: the elderly, seniors, disabled and working class families. RUPCO is also improving local communities through estate development in the Hudson Valley including The Metro, Energy Square, Landmark Place (all in Kingston) and Newburgh’s Historic East End. For more information, visit www.rupco.org.

 

Bon-Odori Dance Festival Photo Exhibition 2011-2017 at The Lace Mill

Youko and Kazuma Yamamoto will host a Bon Odori Dance Festival for Peace Photo Exhibition, 2011-2017 at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston, from January 5 to 31. The opening reception is January 6 from 4-7 p.m. in the West Gallery as part of Kingston’s First Saturday. Displayed photos commemorate peace efforts against nuclear war and promote advocacy of nuclear-free energy consumption.

During the month of August, Japanese citizens observe two events: “Genbaku-Kinenbi” and “Obon.” On August 6, Genbaku-Kinenbi is the Atomic Bomb Memorial Day for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki attacks during World War II. From August 13-16, Obon welcomes home ancestors and rekindles family ties.“Bon-Odori” is the dance festival held within small communities during that time.

In 2008, after opening their restaurant Gomen-Kudasai in New Paltz, NY, the Yamamoto’s began protesting the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings with newletters and meetings. They created peaceful energy by putting out lanterns along the street as a form of remembrance, and meditated with like-minded people. After the Fukushima power plant meltdown in 2011, the couple organized a movement that would combine meditative practices and advocacy under one event, the Bon-Odori Dance Festival for Peace. The couple now hosts the annual dance festival in Kingston and coordinates fundraisers to help pay for event equipment, food, drink, and related expenses. The photo exhibitions are free and open to the public; freewill donations benefit the 2018 Bon Odori Dance Festival for Peace.

“I began organizing Bon-Odori Dance Festival to share and heal everyone from the reality of radiation disasters. I believe now is the time to reflect on how nuclear [energy] effects our present and future generations,” says Youko Yamamoto. “We are not content to be victims. We refuse to wait for an immediate fiery end or the slow poisoning of our world. We refuse to sit idly in terror as the so-called great powers take us past nuclear dusk and bring us recklessly close to nuclear midnight. We rise up. We share our stories of survival. We say: humanity and nuclear weapons cannot coexist.”

Guest parking available on South Manor Street and Progress Avenue.

For more information or a private showing, e-mail  Youko Yamamoto or visit BonOdoriKingston on Facebook.

Artist in Vacancy Exhibit Highlights Newburgh Architecture September 30

Artist in Vacancy Exhibit September 30Newburgh Community Land Bank presents two Artist-in-Vacancy exhibits this week. The first exhibition, organized by Laura Genes, involves work done on-site for the larger RUPCO project around 39 Johnston Street in Newburgh, NY by craftsmen at Affordable Housing Concepts. The architectural installation at 39A Johnston will showcase the new restoration work alongside original architectural details. In addition to highlighting the skilled work done by the workmen onsite, this presentation of the old and the new side-by-side hopes to spark conversation about the value of architectural character and the will necessary to upkeep it. 

Times Herald-Record reporter Leonard Sparks recently featured local craftsmen and the crew’s initiative to recreate and replicate moldings and interior finish trim in a make-shift woodworking studio at 39 Johnston. This exhibit is an opportunity to see the building under-construction and witness the handiwork of the craftsman helping to rebuild Newburgh.

The installation will be open for visitation from noon to 6pm on Saturday, September 30 and will be followed by a lecture by Andrew Linn of BLD, an architect and historian who will be presenting about the legacy of AJ Downing, a pioneer of American architecture. With the help of the Newburgh Community Land Bank, Andrew Linn, Jack Becker and Laura Genes have produced a text about Downing and how his works fit into a larger American canon. This essay has been formatted into a poster and will be available for guests to take home with them. 

The second Artist-in-Vancacy exhibit, GRNASFCK, by Coleen Tuite and Ian Quate will embrace 122/123 Lander from 1 to 6 p.m. on September 30. Click here for more on the artists and their outdoor installation. Come meet the artists over backyard BBQ. Both events are free and open to the public.

ABOUT THE VENUE, 39 JOHNSTON STREET, NEWBURGH: Former home to Newburgh photographer Jacob Ruben, and author of many historic Newburgh Postcards, was a vacant building for many years until the Newburgh Community Land Bank acquired the building from the City. After environmental rehabilitation and stabilization work, the building was transferred to RUPCO as part of a larger 15-property scatter site development utilizing Historic Tax Credits, Low Income Housing Tax Credits, and construction lending from Sterling National Bank, to restore the neighborhood in pockets. The effort will establish 45 new apartments for low-moderate income individuals and their families. The rehabilitation is currently underway, with the first series of homes available in Winter 2018 and the remainder rolling out through Summer 2018. 

ABOUT THE ARTIST: Laura Genes was born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and educated in New York City. She studied architecture at the Cooper Union. Through the use of photography and installation, she describes a human element of the built environment, which is otherwise absent from technical plans and sections. By forcing the body back into structures, the permanence of both forms is put into question. The built form takes on the vulnerability of human-nature and the human body adopts the monumental qualities of a landmark. Both architecture and humans are made to perform in specific time-scales and lifespans; in the case of both, neglecting that destiny is the only way to carry-on. Laura makes work to ask: how can structures preserve our poetry and how can we lend our poetry to structures? Find out more about the exhibit here.

Artwork Inspired by Social Justice Issues focus of Lace Mill Art Exhibit

Lanette Hughes painting abstractOctober is Domestic Violence Awareness Month and coincides with artwork focused on human rights, domestic violence, and world hunger. This is Lanette Hughes’s social activism movement in the form of an art show. This exhibit will take place in all three Lace Mill galleries, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston on October 7 from 3-8 p.m.

Hughes will show 30+ paintings reflecting social issues; all of which, upon their sale, will benefit local organizations that deal with human rights issues. Local nonprofits slated to receive artwork sales include Family of Woodstock, New Paltz, Kingston, Ellenville; the Darmstadt Shelter; Caring Hands Soup Kitchen; Clinton Avenue Methodist Church; MyKingstonKids; O+ Festival; Safe Harbors; and RUPCO. Global organizations include Women in Black and The Haitian People’s Project.

Hughes’ pieces directly relate to real life events. Her abstracts convey deeper messages without being overly explicit. Many pieces depict victims physically harmed, though the paintings don’t graphically portray clear wounds or detailed damage. Each portrayal speaks volumes about issues that are underneath the surface of so many lives — including her own — and nobody would know just by quick observation.

For example, “Human Beings are Not Created for Target Practice” has military undertones. The message conveys a simple thought: if military personnel were stripped of their uniforms, would enemies still shoot them? “Women Running” features women fleeing from human trafficking groups, a worldwide issue that defies ethnicity, gender, and age. Another piece portrays children affected by nerve gassing bundled in blankets; only their faces show, their bodies eerily shrouded mummification-style.

“My hope is that more artists will contribute (to the larger conversation), to include in their work social awareness for change,” says Hughes. “I’d like to see a whole day, week, or month, when artists everywhere do a whole show on a particular social issue.” She also hopes this art show stirs local activism by providing curiosity about what goes on behind the scenes in lives of our acquaintances, co-workers, family, and friends.

Throughout the exhibit’s run, speakers will talk about relevant issues that affect communities. Guy Kempe, Vice President of Community Development at RUPCO, will speak on “Housing, Creative Placemaking, & Community Development” on October 7 at 4:30 p.m. “Aligned with social justice, ‘creative placemaking’ is the proposition that arts and cultural expression, joined with housing, helps to energize community and revitalize disinvested places for minority and disenfranchised populations,” Kempe says. Poet Nancy Smith follows at 6 p.m. with readings from her works that concern human rights.

Filmmaker and veteran Marty Klein will talk about veterans’ issues on October 14, showing his film entitled, “Why Can’t We Serve.”

All artworks are for sale, with 75% of the proceeds donated to organizations that support social justice efforts. The artist retains 25% to cover material expenses associated with making the artwork. Painting prices are negotiable, with no reasonable offer refused. For more information, contact Lace Mill artist-resident Lanette Hughes at (845) 532-3538 or visit her Facebook page LK Hughes.

Lace Mill resident-artists collaborate, artists receptions, gallery exhibits Aug. 5

Dirty-Laundry-lefttoright-Bisio-Lockhart-Cardenas-CulpepperAn integral part of MADKingston’s First Saturday attractions through the City of Kingston, The Lace Mill hosts three artist receptions this Saturday, August 5 from 5 to 8 p.m. at 165 Cornell Street. Resident-artists at The Lace Mill will collaborate on three distinct shows in three distinct onsite galleries. Artist receptions are free and open to the public this weekend.

The first exhibit titled Dirty Laundry appears in The Lace Mill’s East Gallery and Mezzanine. Resident-artists Dawn Bisio, Dan Cardenas, Chelsea Culpepper, and Aaron Lockhart will be showing their multidisciplinary works, featuring several mobile or suspending pieces, mostly made from fabric, plaster, and other objects sculpted together. Through immersive installation, drawing, and sculpture, Dirty Laundry investigates ways of navigating public and private spaces, personal histories, discreet eccentricities, social taboos, and cultural schisms. “Dirty Laundry is the happy result of a community of artists coming together. I wanted to do a dynamic show about secrets and lies, identity and privacy,” says Dawn Bisio. “As our fraught relationship to privacy continues to evolve, these works are a reflection of our precarious disposition in an increasingly porous world.” Her husband and world-renowned recording artist Michael Bisio will entertain gallery visitors with live bass music that evening. For separate viewings of Dirty Laundry through August 19, contact Dawn Bisio at (845) 616-7133 for more details.

Lace Mill resident-artist James Martin with The Watercolor ExhibitJames Martin, another Lace Mill resident-artist, is curating The Watercolor Exhibit with an opening reception also from 5 to 8 p.m. in The Lace Mill Main Gallery and Boiler Room. The Watercolor Exhibit features some of the region’s best watercolor artists including Claudia Engel, Staats Fasoldt, James Martin, Naoko Oshima, Kazuma Oshita, Susan Silverman, Charlotte Tusch, and Lexi Williams. The group will showcase mixed abstract and realism art. Private viewings of The Watercolor Exhibit are available through August 26; contact James Martin at (347) 387-6874 for more details.

Lace Miller Lexi Williams curates the third show with assistance from neighbor James Martin. Entitled The Yellow Spot Tickle Dot Exhibit, this show’s opening reception is also open from 5 to 8 p.m. in The Lace Mill’s West Gallery. This family affair highlights folk art and photography from Williams, her family, and friends. Martin is thrilled to have all three shows happening at the same time. “Rarely do we have all three galleries used at the same time—I know it’s going to be powerful.” Private viewings of The Yellow Spot Tickle Dot Exhibit are available through August 26; contact James Martin at (347) 387-6874 for more details.

Built in 1903, The US Lace Curtain Mill boasted a long history as a major 20th-century employer and fine lace fabricator. RUPCO purchased the vacant shell, boarded up for the better part of three decades, in December 2013, setting in motion adaptive reuse of the historic building with a vision for creative placemaking. A community block party in August 2016 celebrated the opening of 55 apartments of affordable living preferenced for artists, officially anchoring the City of Kingston’s artistic community at the north end of Cornell Street. In addition to residential space, The Lace Mill shares 8,000 square feet of public gallery space as cultural activity centers open to its residents, local community and visiting public audiences. The Lace Mill has received six prestigious awards for design and historic preservation including Preservation Action’s “Best of 2016” and NYSERDA’s Trailblazer Award for housing the City’s largest solar array (160Kw).