Michael Bisio Hits the Right Note in Home-Life Symphony

Michael Bisio holding bass black and white headshotMichael Bisio is an accomplished bassist player, music connoisseur, and long-time adjunct professor. Bisio also moved around many times, from Washington State to NYC, adding to his repertoire of cultural experiences.  He found stability at The Lace Mill in Kingston, where he lives with his wife and fellow artist Dawn Bisio.  Their apartment is his happy place with wiggle room to jive in and hang prized artwork hanging. Now, he can balance professorship, musical gigs, traveling, and love—a harmony he’d sought for years.

Bisio was a reserved student in college, shy and unassuming. Professors took note of his talent and realized self-confidence was holding him back from excelling. They routinely pushed him to step outside of his comfort zone in his work, to self-reflect on the success he wanted. They challenged him to see his potential, flaws included, modeling a budding artist into a star performer. For him, it was tough—to stand in front of sheet music and critics for hours a day. By graduation, he collected his degree and the payoff of a sharper sense of confidence.

Years later, married with a son, Bisio owned a home in Seattle. After experiencing a “high point” in home life, he divorced and moved cross-country for his musical career. He came to NYC, hopping from apartment to apartment for about a decade until he heard about The Lace Mill through a friend. He applied, and a “fantastic” opportunity unfolded for his music, housing and finding the love of his life next door. Dawn and Michael met passing through the door of ASK Gallery in Kingston—Dawn caught Michael’s eye. He flirted with a coy “you’re hot.” Dawn reciprocated, and the two instantly bonded. They soon moved in together and made their own hub for artsy exploration.

Now, Bisio is part of a large pool of artists who help each other out with events hosted at The Lace Mill. He’s glad he is in the mix, but with enough privacy to focus on his ever-evolving career. “I think in the abstract, it created a community that in the long run has proven to be diverse. It [The Lace Mill] gives me a platform to produce concerts, which benefits the community.” Artist-residents attend his concerts and they bring friends. Word of mouth spreads concert details quickly around town. Engaged audience members are key in these live concerts; they are an important “ingredient in the process” and contribute vibes—either high or low frequency—that Bisio feeds off for a unique emotive atmosphere. Live performance, he recognizes, is a special relationship between performer and audience. If the audience doesn’t understand the tradition behind the musical number, “they can still feel it—the overwhelming intensity of it.”

Bisio isn’t going to halt the torrent of gigs soon. He plans on affecting more people through his bassist work as long as he “remains creative and positive.” There’s always more good energy to create in the universe, and he feels it is his responsibility to contribute high-frequency vibrations that align people’s energies into a state of bliss. And after the shows are over, he comes home to his apartment, to relax and rejuvenate as he pleases. Indeed, his sacred space couldn’t be more loving and personal, a place which can be completely silent or filled with music, whichever, and whenever, he prefers. His home is where he can fluctuate between living and prepping for a show, balancing out the dynamics of being and doing, in symphony with his life partner.

Michael’s next Lace Mill concert is Saturday, March 24, from 4-6pm in the East Gallery of The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell St, Kingston. Suggested donation is $10.00. Guest parking is available on South Prospect Street and Manor Avenue. For more information, e-mail Michael at bisio@earthlink.net or visit MichaelBisio.com.

“Sowing Seeds” Art Exhibit hosted by Seed Song Farm at The Lace Mill

An art exhibition “Sowing Seeds: Cultivating Art & Agriculture,” hosted by Seed Song Farm, will take place at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell St, Kingston from March 3-31, 2018. Teaching Art with Families on Saturday, March 10 from 11-12:30pm will be led by A. Kaminski and costs $15. A workshop led by Star Nigro titled, “ECO-Card Art” on March 24 from 11-1pm will delight all ages. Costs is $10; please RSVP to reserve a spot. A free closing reception is on Saturday, March 31 from 4-7pm, open to all ages and includes live music, performance and bilingual social justice storytelling. The entire exhibition will feature the works of Seed Song’s CSA members Star Nigo, Andrew Kaminski, Toni Weidenbacher, Grandpa Woodstock and Philip Gurrieri.

Through photography, mixed media, painting, the fiber arts, and sculpture, these artists will share inspired works from their farm experience. The show is sponsored by CSA member/photographer Tracy Stellingwerf, and curated by farmer coZmoz jaYa and artist Star Nigro.

Come learn what being part of a CSA (Community Sustainable Agriculture) is about and meet your local farmers from Seed Song Farm & Center located in Kingston who will be present with their farm stand to share their CSA model, agro-ecologically-grown vegetables, farm products and their weekly farm pick-up program options and price ranges. They will gladly answer your questions about programs and events. Refreshments provided for free and live music will be presented by Sean Cortright and his band “The Turn-Ups,” composed of musicians from the farm community.

All ages are invited to this event and to add to the festivities attendants may enter a drawing to win a free 1- week CSA pickup. New CSA subscribers will receive a special earl-bird gift.

Free and open to the public; donations toward Seed Song Center’s community work gratefully accepted.

You’ll have the opportunity to join our CSA on the spot with the price range that suits your needs.

Free available parking on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street.

For more information, please e-mail info@seedsongfarm.org; call coZmoz jaYa at (845) 399-9388; or visit www.seedsongfarm.org

Enjoy an Afternoon of Elegance at The Lace Mill March 24

Jazz trio Kirk Knuffke, Fred Lonberg-Holm and Michael Bisio will perform at The Lace Mill East Gallery, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston on March 24 from 4pm to 6pm. Listen to expert musicians create symphony on the spot provoked by a powerful mix of talent in an all-inclusive performance. Toe-tapping and soul-stirring moments fill the Sunday afternoon impromptu jazz session.

From top reviewers:
“Knuffke’s cornet playing is (as always) flawless. He can deliver burning runs, slur and chirp notes, all with full command of his most demanding instrument.” –All About Jazz

“Try to pin Fred Longberg-Holm down and you’re liable to leave your map looking like a pincushion.” –Bill Meyer, Dusted Magazine

“…a marvously inventive bassist that seemingly has burst forth over the years as a musical trunk rather than a branch…and he taps into a virtually inexhaustive wellspring of musical ideas when he plays.”—Grego Applegate Edwards www.gapplegatemusicreview.blogspot.com

This jazz session is one of an ongoing series at The Lace Mill. Free and open to the public. A $10 suggested donation helps cover travel expenses incurred by musicians.

Use available parking on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street.

For more information, visit thelacemill.com, e-mail Michael at bisio@earthlink.net.

Tannery Brook’s Forgotten History March 3 Saturday at The Lace Mill

 Emily Vail and Jiamin Chen will show “Fragmented & Forgotten: Tracing the Tannery Brook” in The Lace Mill’s East Gallery at 165 Cornell Street, Kingston, NY. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, March 3 from 5-8 PM, as part of Kingston’s First Saturday gallery openings. The exhibit will be on display March 3 through March 25. Original maps of the Tannery Brook, paired with historic maps, images, and text, will visualize changes in and around the stream over time.

The Tannery Brook is a small stream in Kingston. The brook flows out of the Twin Ponds, travels downhill along Linderman Avenue, crosses under Washington Avenue, skirts property lines between Washington Avenue and Green Street, and then vanishes beneath the parking lot behind the Ulster County Family Court building. It makes the rest of its journey underground, in a pipe, until it meets the Esopus Creek behind Kingston Plaza.

Although the Tannery Brook has worked hard for Kingston over the centuries – including powering mills, irrigating crops, and carrying away waste – it has been increasingly fragmented and forgotten. It hasn’t been forgotten by everyone, though; it continues to make its presence known through flooding, infrastructure failure, and other damage.

The Tannery Brook is a microcosm of the ways that we perceive and manage water in cities. Its history and present state can provide context for modern stream and urban water management, as we ask: What should we expect from a stream with such a long history of use? How can this history relate to future restoration projects?

With these questions in mind, Emily Vail and Jiamin Chen trace the Tannery Brook’s history from colonial settlement in the 1650s through today using historic maps, historic images, local history narratives, newspaper articles, and other original documents.

About Emily Vail:

Emily Vail is a graduate student at Cornell University in the field of Natural Resources. Since 2010, Emily has worked at the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation’s Hudson River Estuary Program , in collaboration with the NYS Water Resources Institute at Cornell University . She supports community-based watershed groups, municipalities, and other partners as they work to improve water quality in the Hudson Valley. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies from Vassar College . Emily also organizes Uptown Swing Kingston, a monthly night of hot jazz, dance, and swing, and directs the Uptown Lowdown vintage jazz dance troupe.


About Jiamin Chen:

Jiamin Chen is a graduate landscape architecture student from Cornell University . Originally from Vancouver, Canada, she has a bachelor’s degree in environmental design from the University of British Columbia . She worked as a landscape designer on various municipal and governmental projects across many parts of Asia including China, Malaysia, Qatar and Myanmar. She returned to graduate school in pursuit of professional licensure, and her work as a graduate research assistant has taken her to various parts of upstate New York and this year, to Kingston. In her spare time, she is a passionate botanical artist, a houseplant collector and an avid traveler.

This work is supported by the NYS Water Resources Institute at Cornell University and the Hudson River Estuary Program of the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation , with support from the NYS Environmental Protection Fund .

For more information, contact Emily Vail at eev22@cornell.edu .

ABOUT THE LACE MILL : A community block party in August 2016 celebrated the opening of 55 apartments of affordable living preferenced for artists, officially anchoring the City of Kingston’s artistic community at the north end of Cornell Street. In addition to residential space, The Lace Mill shares 8,000 square feet of public gallery space as cultural activity centers open to its residents, local community and visiting public audiences. The Lace Mill has received six prestigious awards for design and historic preservation including Preservation Action’s “Best of 2016” and NYSERDA’s Trailblazer Award for housing the City’s largest solar array (160Kw). Built in 1903, The US Lace Curtain Mill boasted a long history as a major 20th-century employer and fine lace fabricator. RUPCO purchased the vacant shell, boarded up for the better part of three decades, in December 2013, setting in motion adaptive reuse of the historic building with a vision for creative placemaking. For more information, visit www.thelacemill.com .

ABOUT RUPCO : RUPCO, affordable housing advocate and innovative community developer in the Hudson Valley, is a charter member of NeighborWorks America, a national network of 245 housing and community development change agents. RUPCO affects the lives of over 8,000 people through its work with homelessness, rental assistance, foreclosure prevention, first-time homebuyers, home rehabilitation, energy efficiency and real estate development. RUPCO connects nearly 2000 families, over 800 landlords and rental assistance through the NYS Home and Community Renewal and Housing Choice Voucher Program. RUPCO currently owns/manages 16 properties with 411 apartments providing homes to over 560 people. The majority of those residents represent our community’s most vulnerable populations: the elderly, seniors, disabled and working class families. RUPCO is also improving local communities through estate development in the Hudson Valley including The Metro, Energy Square, Landmark Place (all in Kingston) and Newburgh’s Historic East End. For more information, visit www.rupco.org.


Hope Through Activism: Lanette Hughes Inspires Through Artwork

Standing outside The Lace Mill, wearing over-sized black sunglasses, talking to a neighbor, Lanette Hughes appears nondescript. A cordial, “Hi, how are you?” to a stranger, she resumes her conversation. You would never guess she churned her tragedy into art in a profound way. A first-hand experience with domestic violence, her identity stolen and her savings robbed from her, these life-lesson setbacks made her willpower stronger. Lanette Hughes is not only a survivor, but a thriver — and her artwork embodies her understated vigor.

Hughe’s parents introduced her to situations at an early age that called for toughening up. They lived in Europe withinin target sites of WWII battle and concentration camp zones. While transitioning between countries, she found it difficult to reconcile that she had friends from opposing countries post-wartime. Her parent’s trip to Dachau further fragmented her sense of peace. The air-raid rubble and abandoned buildings that littered some streets haunted her as a child, a terror still raw when she thinks back.

Recently, Hughes channeled that experience into her artwork, “Human Beings are Not Created for Target Practice.” The large canvas oil painting highlights military personnel . If stripped of their uniforms, would they have reason to shoot the enemy? Hughes bears no bias towards “good” and “bad” sides where nationalism incurs.

She is, however, partial to beautiful art. While living in Germany, Hughes remembers trekking down to monasteries and playing nearby. One day while climbing a wall enclosure surrounding St. Michaelsberg, she fell and hurt herself. Monks brought her in, and she was introduced to wondrous sculpture and paintings within. Inspired, she asked her parents to hire a governess educate her in classical art training and illumination found in religious texts.

Being a sensitive artist and a newcomer whenever her parents moved, she stood out from the crowd. Coming to the United States, she was sorely misunderstood for her European values and mannerisms. She was often bullied and put down, and over time, these experiences impacted her artwork.

She was a target again a few years back, after she returned from a trip to Florida to find her identity stolen. Her home, savings, and future fell through her hands. Hughes became homeless, living out of her car, where she slept and traveled for weeks in Woodstock. She refused to give up her dog when Social Services prompted her to do so, so she could receive a no-pets hotel room. Deprived of everything else, she wasn’t relinquishing her four-footed companion.

Hughes kept her spirits up and applied to housing assistance programs in the local area that would allow dogs. At the time, RUPCO was accepting applications for The Lace Mill for artists. She applied to the lottery  and the patterns of the universe aligned with her needs. “In the miracle of miracles, I got RUPCO housing. And I love it here—every day I thank my creator for this fabulous place and all the friends I have made.”

Hughes realizes that others don’t have it as good. At her last exhibition, held at The Lace Mill in October 2017, Hughes combined her activism with her art show, and made a stand for something larger than making money. She created 50 pieces for sale, where 75% of proceeds benefited local charities. One of her paintings benefited the Haitian People’s Project to provide meals for afflicted families. Consistently without food, Haitian parents often feed their children “mud cakes.” These look like pies, but made of mud, and eating them causes malnutrition and infection. Hughes wants to help in her way, through her art and social activism.

Hughes is proud to live in an apartment where she knows her efforts are supported. She’s made many connections to Kingston nonprofits and continues to support human rights in the way she knows best. Her influence has already been felt among the community; one man started to cry when he saw one of her paintings regarding domestic violence. “’This happened to me, and I’ve never told anybody,’” Hughes recalls. “It really touched him. He didn’t say whether it happened to him, his mother, wife or girlfriend, but it happened to him somehow.”

Her paintings possess an understated emotional impact. She doesn’t wish people to turn aghast, but she wants her visual to resonate with them. She wants people to know that there is awareness, that others have been through similar situations, and the often misunderstood pain — maybe portrayed as endless swirls or spirals in her abstract work — is normal and valid. She connects to her audience on a personal level. “I don’t like the word authentic, but I try to be sincere about who I am. I’ve been through things and I try to relate that to other people.”

Maybe malnutrition, abuse, or trauma has robbed a person of identity, and they use public facades to hide the pain. By recognizing themselves in her work, a part of them is resurrected and recognized. Maybe it will take years to fix, with in-between years of denial. But something clicked, and that is what activism is all about.

Hughes has changed her perspective on earning a living and being an artist. “I don’t need as much as I thought I needed to make me happy. I’m happy with or without. But the fact that I can paint whatever I want is an incredible blessing. And because I live here, I can do that.”

Black History Month Kingston 2018

Calendar of events for Black History Month Kingston February 1-28, 2018 The newly formed A.J. Williams-Myers African Roots Library, located in Kingston’s Ponckhockie area, kicks off its first community-wide celebration of Black History. The combination of events and activities, include history, song, dance, drama and reenactments citywide. Black History Month Kingston 2018 pays tribute to the legacy and contributions of African-Americans in Kingston and the surrounding areas. Art exhibits, performances, spoken word, and dance are happening throughout February:

February 3:  Black History Month Kingston kick-off, 1-5pm, The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston, Free:
– Bluu Motion Exhibit by Frank Waters: An interactive exhibit showcasing a variety of animated movies, series, music videos and stills using a machinima concept
– The Poetry Corner: Youth are reciting a variety of poems from 
black poets from the 1800’s-1900’s
– Special African dance performance
Center for Creative Education Energy Dance Company

February 3:  Black History Today: Silence is Not an Option, 6-8pm, African Roots Library, 43 Gill Street, Kingston, Free

February 7: Comedy Slam, 6-9pm, Kingston Artist Collective, 63 Broadway, Kingston, suggested donation $5

February 14: Ruby Mae Sweetheart Love & Soul Night, 7-10pm, 331 Hasbrouck Avenue, Kingston, Food priced off the menu

February 18:  MyKingstonKids Puzzle Party, 1-4pm, The Library at the A.J. Williams-Myers African Roots Center, 43 Gill Street, Kingston, Free

February 23: Ruby Mae Sweetheart Love & Soul Night, 7-10pm, 331 Hasbrouck Avenue, Kingston, Food priced off the menu

February  24:  First-person re-enactment of Sojourner Truth, 1-4pm, The Sanctuary of The Old Dutch Reformed Church, 272 Wall Street, Kingston, Free. Historic interpreter Deborah Zull of Saugerties will present Sojourner’s famous “Ain’t I A Woman?”  speech and conduct an interview of Sojourner by James Bartholomew “Jimmy” Olsen, a fictional reporter. Sojourner is one of Kingston’s most famous women, and most famous person of color, and in celebration of Black History Month, RUPCO brings this history moment to life.

February 24: Black History Month Kingston Gala, 7-11pm, Arts Society of Kingston, 97 Broadway, Kingston, Tickets on sale now. The celebration introduces the first Ben Wigfall Legacy Award to his family and the first community recipient, Tay Fisher of Kingston.

February 25: Giving Life-from Survival to LGBTQ, Black Excellence, 3-5pm, HVLGBTQ Center, 300 Wall Street, Kingston, Free

February 28:  Closing event, 6-9pm, Broadway Arts, 694 Broadway, Kingston, Free

February 24: African drumming with Amabou Diallo, 10-30am-12:30pm, Kingston City Library, 55 Franklin Street, Kingston, Free

In addition to the month-long off-site events, schools are invited to visit the Black History Month Kingston exhibits in The Lace Mill’s three galleries. Students will have a chance to engage creatively in many different platforms showcasing African-American history and culture. The goal is to make African-American history a source of pride and awareness for everyone.

For more information, visit Black History Month Kingston.

Bon-Odori Dance Festival Photo Exhibition 2011-2017 at The Lace Mill

Youko and Kazuma Yamamoto will host a Bon Odori Dance Festival for Peace Photo Exhibition, 2011-2017 at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston, from January 5 to 31. The opening reception is January 6 from 4-7 p.m. in the West Gallery as part of Kingston’s First Saturday. Displayed photos commemorate peace efforts against nuclear war and promote advocacy of nuclear-free energy consumption.

During the month of August, Japanese citizens observe two events: “Genbaku-Kinenbi” and “Obon.” On August 6, Genbaku-Kinenbi is the Atomic Bomb Memorial Day for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki attacks during World War II. From August 13-16, Obon welcomes home ancestors and rekindles family ties.“Bon-Odori” is the dance festival held within small communities during that time.

In 2008, after opening their restaurant Gomen-Kudasai in New Paltz, NY, the Yamamoto’s began protesting the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings with newletters and meetings. They created peaceful energy by putting out lanterns along the street as a form of remembrance, and meditated with like-minded people. After the Fukushima power plant meltdown in 2011, the couple organized a movement that would combine meditative practices and advocacy under one event, the Bon-Odori Dance Festival for Peace. The couple now hosts the annual dance festival in Kingston and coordinates fundraisers to help pay for event equipment, food, drink, and related expenses. The photo exhibitions are free and open to the public; freewill donations benefit the 2018 Bon Odori Dance Festival for Peace.

“I began organizing Bon-Odori Dance Festival to share and heal everyone from the reality of radiation disasters. I believe now is the time to reflect on how nuclear [energy] effects our present and future generations,” says Youko Yamamoto. “We are not content to be victims. We refuse to wait for an immediate fiery end or the slow poisoning of our world. We refuse to sit idly in terror as the so-called great powers take us past nuclear dusk and bring us recklessly close to nuclear midnight. We rise up. We share our stories of survival. We say: humanity and nuclear weapons cannot coexist.”

Guest parking available on South Manor Street and Progress Avenue.

For more information or a private showing, e-mail  Youko Yamamoto or visit BonOdoriKingston on Facebook.

The Metro Hosts Made in Kingston on December 7

Made in Kingston invitationLocal arts businesses, makers, artists, and creators gather Thursday, December 7 for an expo of all things made in Kingston, at a new space under development in Midtown, the city’s up-and-coming arts district. The fifth annual Made In Kingston is co-sponsored by the City of Kingston, Kingston Midtown Arts District, Arts Mid Hudson, Business Alliance of Kingston, and RUPCO. 

This year’s event will be held at The Metro, the former MetLife Hall of Records building, at 2 South Prospect Street (on the corner of Greenkill Avenue, opposite the Boys and Girls Club). RUPCO closed on the 70,000-square-foot underutilized, near-vacant factory/warehouse earlier this year and is donating the space for this special event. RUPCO is proposing The Metro as a film and technology hub to include maker spaces and other creative uses.

“We are thrilled to host Made in Kingston for the second time in one of our buildings,” notes Kevin O’Connor, Chief Operating Officer at RUPCO. “This time, the event foretells what The Metro is all about. In addition to enjoying and purchasing goods from all the makers, we hope this gives attendees the opportunity to see the vision for The Metro, a center for film, TV, technology and makers alike. This building is about the local economy based in creative production with the overarching goal of providing job training and pathways to equity where people make sustainable livings from their creativity. The Metro brings community vitality forward in a space long vacant of any activity or inspiration.”

Made in Kingston opens its doors to the public at 4 p.m. through 8:30 p.m. In addition to more than four dozen local artists, the evening will feature local food, beverages and musical entertainment. For artists’ online registration click here.

“We couldn’t be prouder to support such a homegrown event that continues to expand every year, showcasing the diverse offerings made in Kingston and by ‘Kingstonians’,” said Mayor Steve Noble. “The event has transformed office buildings and warehouses into pop-up boutiques overflowing with locally made products sought after by visitors from throughout the region and beyond. Kingston’s economy is growing stronger every day and it is thanks to the unwavering commitment and investment in our community by our local business owners and entrepreneurs. I look forward to supporting each of them at this exciting event.”

“Over the last few years, we have come to realize just how great the resources are that we have here in Kingston,” added Richard Frumess, a co-founder of the Arts District. “Chief among them is the unique wealth of art manufacturing and crafts industry that is showcased by the annual Made in Kingston event. With our City officials, we are working hard to realize the creative potential the District represents for revitalizing the City.”

For further information, call 845-331-2238 or visit www.madeinkingstonNY.com and www.facebook.com/Made In Kingston

True Storytelling Performance with TMI Project at Lace Mill on November 9

Lace Mill image with description in white lettersEveryone has a “TMI” story (the ones they’ve kept a secret because of fear, shame, or embarrassment) that they’ve always wanted to share, but felt couldn’t or shouldn’t. Lace Mill resident-artists will share with their true, personal perspectives uncovered through their three-month writing experience. Readers share their recent writings based on epiphanies and personal revelations, that “Too Much Information” stuff, stories that will inspire, sadden, madden, and enlighten you.

RUPCO, in partnership with TMI Project, invited residents of the Lace Mill, a residence for artists in Kingston, NY, to participate in a 10-week workshop series led by Eva Tenuto and Sari Botton of TMI Project, during which participants could take time to find the story they most need to tell, feel supported telling it in a safe space, be guided to tell it in a way that ensured they will be heard powerfully, release shame and stigma, clear space for new perspectives, and fully embrace their power. Select participants will perform their true stories crafted during the workshop series for each other, the larger RUPCO community and the general public at this performance. This True Storytelling Performance will be held on Thursday, November 9 at 7 p.m. in The Lace Mill’s West Gallery at 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. 

Among those Lace Mill resident-artists performing:

RUPCO and TMI Project began their partnership in 2016 at Park Heights, a senior housing campus in Rosendale. “TMI Project is thrilled to be working with different RUPCO communities,” said Tenuto, TMI Project’s co-founder and executive director. “After struggling to find housing, it’s nice to not only unpack bags and boxes but also the stories that have been carried along the way. In addition to deepening a sense of community at various residences, we hope this partnership helps participants alleviate some of the lingering burdens of the past and clears the space for a happy, healthy home.”

This event is open to the public. Freewilll donations of $5 (or more) will benefit The Lace Mill Art Council and a future TMI Project workshop. Light refreshments will be provided. Free on-street parking is available on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street.

ABOUT TMI PROJECT: TMI Project is a non-profit organization founded by executive director Eva Tenuto and Julie Novak, which offers memoir writing workshops that culminate in performances and/or publication. Through its Community Outreach Initiative, TMI Project brings distinct versions of its workshops to the incarcerated, at-risk teens, cancer patients, survivors of domestic violence, military veterans, LBGTQ teens, and other populations where people don’t often get to tell their stories or be heard. In its workshops, TMI Project workshop leaders help people write well-crafted true stories from their lives, including the “TMI” or “too much information” part they usually leave out because it’s too painful, shameful, or embarrassing. The workshops typically culminate in Moth-style storytelling shows where participants perform their stories for a live audience.


Watercolor Demo at The Lace Mill October 19

The Lace Mill resident-artist community opens its doors to the Mezzanine studio to showcase a watercolor demonstration at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. Thursday, October 19 from 6-7p, Hudson Valley watercolorist and Woodstock School of Art instructor Staats Fasoldt shares his mastery of paints and techniques for both new and accomplished artists.

Staats Fasoldt, watercolorist and instructor at Woodstock School of Art

photo courtesy of Woodstock School of Art

This demonstration is open to the public. Freewill donations are encouraged and will benefit The Lace Mill Arts Council, future exhibits, workshops, and demonstrations. For more information, contact James Martin (347) 387-6874.

Demonstration logistics: The Lace Mill’s front door will be open and a greeter will direct you to the Mezzanine studio. Free on-street parking is available on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street. All are welcome to attend.