TMI Project True Storytelling Performance at Lace Mill, August 15

announcement for TMI Project Storytelling August 15, 2018RUPCO hosts its second true storytelling performance with the TMI Project on Wednesday, August 15 from 7 to 9 p.m. in The Lace Mill East Gallery, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. 

Eight Lace Mill residents will share their personal journeys of discovery in this highly intimate exchange. Bring a friend and enjoy an evening of personal transformation through the medium of storytelling.

To view the November 2017 stories shared, click here. 

This event is free and open to the public.  Light refreshments will be served. Off-street parking is available on Prospect Street and South Manor Avenue.  Freewill donations support  The Lace Mill’s three galleries, artist receptions and public showings year-round. 

“Sowing Seeds” Art Exhibit hosted by Seed Song Farm at The Lace Mill

An art exhibition “Sowing Seeds: Cultivating Art & Agriculture,” hosted by Seed Song Farm, will take place at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell St, Kingston from March 3-31, 2018. Teaching Art with Families on Saturday, March 10 from 11-12:30pm will be led by A. Kaminski and costs $15. A workshop led by Star Nigro titled, “ECO-Card Art” on March 24 from 11-1pm will delight all ages. Costs is $10; please RSVP to reserve a spot. A free closing reception is on Saturday, March 31 from 4-7pm, open to all ages and includes live music, performance and bilingual social justice storytelling. The entire exhibition will feature the works of Seed Song’s CSA members Star Nigo, Andrew Kaminski, Toni Weidenbacher, Grandpa Woodstock and Philip Gurrieri.

Through photography, mixed media, painting, the fiber arts, and sculpture, these artists will share inspired works from their farm experience. The show is sponsored by CSA member/photographer Tracy Stellingwerf, and curated by farmer coZmoz jaYa and artist Star Nigro.

Come learn what being part of a CSA (Community Sustainable Agriculture) is about and meet your local farmers from Seed Song Farm & Center located in Kingston who will be present with their farm stand to share their CSA model, agro-ecologically-grown vegetables, farm products and their weekly farm pick-up program options and price ranges. They will gladly answer your questions about programs and events. Refreshments provided for free and live music will be presented by Sean Cortright and his band “The Turn-Ups,” composed of musicians from the farm community.

All ages are invited to this event and to add to the festivities attendants may enter a drawing to win a free 1- week CSA pickup. New CSA subscribers will receive a special earl-bird gift.

Free and open to the public; donations toward Seed Song Center’s community work gratefully accepted.

You’ll have the opportunity to join our CSA on the spot with the price range that suits your needs.

Free available parking on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street.

For more information, please e-mail info@seedsongfarm.org; call coZmoz jaYa at (845) 399-9388; or visit www.seedsongfarm.org

Tannery Brook’s Forgotten History March 3 Saturday at The Lace Mill

 Emily Vail and Jiamin Chen will show “Fragmented & Forgotten: Tracing the Tannery Brook” in The Lace Mill’s East Gallery at 165 Cornell Street, Kingston, NY. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, March 3 from 5-8 PM, as part of Kingston’s First Saturday gallery openings. The exhibit will be on display March 3 through March 25. Original maps of the Tannery Brook, paired with historic maps, images, and text, will visualize changes in and around the stream over time.

The Tannery Brook is a small stream in Kingston. The brook flows out of the Twin Ponds, travels downhill along Linderman Avenue, crosses under Washington Avenue, skirts property lines between Washington Avenue and Green Street, and then vanishes beneath the parking lot behind the Ulster County Family Court building. It makes the rest of its journey underground, in a pipe, until it meets the Esopus Creek behind Kingston Plaza.

Although the Tannery Brook has worked hard for Kingston over the centuries – including powering mills, irrigating crops, and carrying away waste – it has been increasingly fragmented and forgotten. It hasn’t been forgotten by everyone, though; it continues to make its presence known through flooding, infrastructure failure, and other damage.

The Tannery Brook is a microcosm of the ways that we perceive and manage water in cities. Its history and present state can provide context for modern stream and urban water management, as we ask: What should we expect from a stream with such a long history of use? How can this history relate to future restoration projects?

With these questions in mind, Emily Vail and Jiamin Chen trace the Tannery Brook’s history from colonial settlement in the 1650s through today using historic maps, historic images, local history narratives, newspaper articles, and other original documents.

About Emily Vail:

Emily Vail is a graduate student at Cornell University in the field of Natural Resources. Since 2010, Emily has worked at the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation’s Hudson River Estuary Program , in collaboration with the NYS Water Resources Institute at Cornell University . She supports community-based watershed groups, municipalities, and other partners as they work to improve water quality in the Hudson Valley. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies from Vassar College . Emily also organizes Uptown Swing Kingston, a monthly night of hot jazz, dance, and swing, and directs the Uptown Lowdown vintage jazz dance troupe.

 

About Jiamin Chen:

Jiamin Chen is a graduate landscape architecture student from Cornell University . Originally from Vancouver, Canada, she has a bachelor’s degree in environmental design from the University of British Columbia . She worked as a landscape designer on various municipal and governmental projects across many parts of Asia including China, Malaysia, Qatar and Myanmar. She returned to graduate school in pursuit of professional licensure, and her work as a graduate research assistant has taken her to various parts of upstate New York and this year, to Kingston. In her spare time, she is a passionate botanical artist, a houseplant collector and an avid traveler.

This work is supported by the NYS Water Resources Institute at Cornell University and the Hudson River Estuary Program of the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation , with support from the NYS Environmental Protection Fund .

For more information, contact Emily Vail at eev22@cornell.edu .

ABOUT THE LACE MILL : A community block party in August 2016 celebrated the opening of 55 apartments of affordable living preferenced for artists, officially anchoring the City of Kingston’s artistic community at the north end of Cornell Street. In addition to residential space, The Lace Mill shares 8,000 square feet of public gallery space as cultural activity centers open to its residents, local community and visiting public audiences. The Lace Mill has received six prestigious awards for design and historic preservation including Preservation Action’s “Best of 2016” and NYSERDA’s Trailblazer Award for housing the City’s largest solar array (160Kw). Built in 1903, The US Lace Curtain Mill boasted a long history as a major 20th-century employer and fine lace fabricator. RUPCO purchased the vacant shell, boarded up for the better part of three decades, in December 2013, setting in motion adaptive reuse of the historic building with a vision for creative placemaking. For more information, visit www.thelacemill.com .

ABOUT RUPCO : RUPCO, affordable housing advocate and innovative community developer in the Hudson Valley, is a charter member of NeighborWorks America, a national network of 245 housing and community development change agents. RUPCO affects the lives of over 8,000 people through its work with homelessness, rental assistance, foreclosure prevention, first-time homebuyers, home rehabilitation, energy efficiency and real estate development. RUPCO connects nearly 2000 families, over 800 landlords and rental assistance through the NYS Home and Community Renewal and Housing Choice Voucher Program. RUPCO currently owns/manages 16 properties with 411 apartments providing homes to over 560 people. The majority of those residents represent our community’s most vulnerable populations: the elderly, seniors, disabled and working class families. RUPCO is also improving local communities through estate development in the Hudson Valley including The Metro, Energy Square, Landmark Place (all in Kingston) and Newburgh’s Historic East End. For more information, visit www.rupco.org.

 

Bon-Odori Dance Festival Photo Exhibition 2011-2017 at The Lace Mill

Youko and Kazuma Yamamoto will host a Bon Odori Dance Festival for Peace Photo Exhibition, 2011-2017 at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston, from January 5 to 31. The opening reception is January 6 from 4-7 p.m. in the West Gallery as part of Kingston’s First Saturday. Displayed photos commemorate peace efforts against nuclear war and promote advocacy of nuclear-free energy consumption.

During the month of August, Japanese citizens observe two events: “Genbaku-Kinenbi” and “Obon.” On August 6, Genbaku-Kinenbi is the Atomic Bomb Memorial Day for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki attacks during World War II. From August 13-16, Obon welcomes home ancestors and rekindles family ties.“Bon-Odori” is the dance festival held within small communities during that time.

In 2008, after opening their restaurant Gomen-Kudasai in New Paltz, NY, the Yamamoto’s began protesting the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings with newletters and meetings. They created peaceful energy by putting out lanterns along the street as a form of remembrance, and meditated with like-minded people. After the Fukushima power plant meltdown in 2011, the couple organized a movement that would combine meditative practices and advocacy under one event, the Bon-Odori Dance Festival for Peace. The couple now hosts the annual dance festival in Kingston and coordinates fundraisers to help pay for event equipment, food, drink, and related expenses. The photo exhibitions are free and open to the public; freewill donations benefit the 2018 Bon Odori Dance Festival for Peace.

“I began organizing Bon-Odori Dance Festival to share and heal everyone from the reality of radiation disasters. I believe now is the time to reflect on how nuclear [energy] effects our present and future generations,” says Youko Yamamoto. “We are not content to be victims. We refuse to wait for an immediate fiery end or the slow poisoning of our world. We refuse to sit idly in terror as the so-called great powers take us past nuclear dusk and bring us recklessly close to nuclear midnight. We rise up. We share our stories of survival. We say: humanity and nuclear weapons cannot coexist.”

Guest parking available on South Manor Street and Progress Avenue.

For more information or a private showing, e-mail  Youko Yamamoto or visit BonOdoriKingston on Facebook.

“The Davis Show” is a family affair at The Lace Mill November 4

The Davis FamilyJeromy Davis, his fiancée Christa, and their children Jesse, Sebastien and Emmy will drive a family-fueled night of musical and artistic performances called “The Davis Show” on November 4 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston in the Boiler Room Gallery.

Jesse’s sculptures will adorn the galleries and he’ll sing his heart out in solo tunes. Sebastien and Emmy’s crayon drawings will hang on display and entice the young and old to reflect on youth’s artistic vision. Christa will show her paintings as well. Jeromy will play music among handmade barn wood sound-dampening panels and feature guitars he built both as a musical and visual artistic display. Altogether, they will demonstrate family ties in a multi-layered performance. This will be the family’s first solo performance. “There’s something for everybody. I want people to go, ‘wow, this is really nice,”’ says Jeromy.

Free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. Free parking is available on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street. Freewill donations benefit the Lace Mill Arts Council, future shows and exhibits.

The Metro Hosts Made in Kingston on December 7

Made in Kingston invitationLocal arts businesses, makers, artists, and creators gather Thursday, December 7 for an expo of all things made in Kingston, at a new space under development in Midtown, the city’s up-and-coming arts district. The fifth annual Made In Kingston is co-sponsored by the City of Kingston, Kingston Midtown Arts District, Arts Mid Hudson, Business Alliance of Kingston, and RUPCO. 

This year’s event will be held at The Metro, the former MetLife Hall of Records building, at 2 South Prospect Street (on the corner of Greenkill Avenue, opposite the Boys and Girls Club). RUPCO closed on the 70,000-square-foot underutilized, near-vacant factory/warehouse earlier this year and is donating the space for this special event. RUPCO is proposing The Metro as a film and technology hub to include maker spaces and other creative uses.

“We are thrilled to host Made in Kingston for the second time in one of our buildings,” notes Kevin O’Connor, Chief Operating Officer at RUPCO. “This time, the event foretells what The Metro is all about. In addition to enjoying and purchasing goods from all the makers, we hope this gives attendees the opportunity to see the vision for The Metro, a center for film, TV, technology and makers alike. This building is about the local economy based in creative production with the overarching goal of providing job training and pathways to equity where people make sustainable livings from their creativity. The Metro brings community vitality forward in a space long vacant of any activity or inspiration.”

Made in Kingston opens its doors to the public at 4 p.m. through 8:30 p.m. In addition to more than four dozen local artists, the evening will feature local food, beverages and musical entertainment. For artists’ online registration click here.

“We couldn’t be prouder to support such a homegrown event that continues to expand every year, showcasing the diverse offerings made in Kingston and by ‘Kingstonians’,” said Mayor Steve Noble. “The event has transformed office buildings and warehouses into pop-up boutiques overflowing with locally made products sought after by visitors from throughout the region and beyond. Kingston’s economy is growing stronger every day and it is thanks to the unwavering commitment and investment in our community by our local business owners and entrepreneurs. I look forward to supporting each of them at this exciting event.”

“Over the last few years, we have come to realize just how great the resources are that we have here in Kingston,” added Richard Frumess, a co-founder of the Arts District. “Chief among them is the unique wealth of art manufacturing and crafts industry that is showcased by the annual Made in Kingston event. With our City officials, we are working hard to realize the creative potential the District represents for revitalizing the City.”

For further information, call 845-331-2238 or visit www.madeinkingstonNY.com and www.facebook.com/Made In Kingston

True Storytelling Performance with TMI Project at Lace Mill on November 9

Lace Mill image with description in white lettersEveryone has a “TMI” story (the ones they’ve kept a secret because of fear, shame, or embarrassment) that they’ve always wanted to share, but felt couldn’t or shouldn’t. Lace Mill resident-artists will share with their true, personal perspectives uncovered through their three-month writing experience. Readers share their recent writings based on epiphanies and personal revelations, that “Too Much Information” stuff, stories that will inspire, sadden, madden, and enlighten you.

RUPCO, in partnership with TMI Project, invited residents of the Lace Mill, a residence for artists in Kingston, NY, to participate in a 10-week workshop series led by Eva Tenuto and Sari Botton of TMI Project, during which participants could take time to find the story they most need to tell, feel supported telling it in a safe space, be guided to tell it in a way that ensured they will be heard powerfully, release shame and stigma, clear space for new perspectives, and fully embrace their power. Select participants will perform their true stories crafted during the workshop series for each other, the larger RUPCO community and the general public at this performance. This True Storytelling Performance will be held on Thursday, November 9 at 7 p.m. in The Lace Mill’s West Gallery at 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. 

Among those Lace Mill resident-artists performing:

RUPCO and TMI Project began their partnership in 2016 at Park Heights, a senior housing campus in Rosendale. “TMI Project is thrilled to be working with different RUPCO communities,” said Tenuto, TMI Project’s co-founder and executive director. “After struggling to find housing, it’s nice to not only unpack bags and boxes but also the stories that have been carried along the way. In addition to deepening a sense of community at various residences, we hope this partnership helps participants alleviate some of the lingering burdens of the past and clears the space for a happy, healthy home.”

This event is open to the public. Freewilll donations of $5 (or more) will benefit The Lace Mill Art Council and a future TMI Project workshop. Light refreshments will be provided. Free on-street parking is available on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street.

ABOUT TMI PROJECT: TMI Project is a non-profit organization founded by executive director Eva Tenuto and Julie Novak, which offers memoir writing workshops that culminate in performances and/or publication. Through its Community Outreach Initiative, TMI Project brings distinct versions of its workshops to the incarcerated, at-risk teens, cancer patients, survivors of domestic violence, military veterans, LBGTQ teens, and other populations where people don’t often get to tell their stories or be heard. In its workshops, TMI Project workshop leaders help people write well-crafted true stories from their lives, including the “TMI” or “too much information” part they usually leave out because it’s too painful, shameful, or embarrassing. The workshops typically culminate in Moth-style storytelling shows where participants perform their stories for a live audience.

 

Watercolor Demo at The Lace Mill October 19

The Lace Mill resident-artist community opens its doors to the Mezzanine studio to showcase a watercolor demonstration at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. Thursday, October 19 from 6-7p, Hudson Valley watercolorist and Woodstock School of Art instructor Staats Fasoldt shares his mastery of paints and techniques for both new and accomplished artists.

Staats Fasoldt, watercolorist and instructor at Woodstock School of Art

photo courtesy of Woodstock School of Art

This demonstration is open to the public. Freewill donations are encouraged and will benefit The Lace Mill Arts Council, future exhibits, workshops, and demonstrations. For more information, contact James Martin (347) 387-6874.

Demonstration logistics: The Lace Mill’s front door will be open and a greeter will direct you to the Mezzanine studio. Free on-street parking is available on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street. All are welcome to attend.

Jazz Masters Perform at Lace Mill on October 8

JazzMasters perform at The Lace Mill on October 8 at 4pThe Lace Mill hosts jazz masters from around the world on Sunday, October 8 at 4 p.m. in The Lace Mill East Gallery, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. The afternoon concert features multiple acts of artistry including rich musical pieces performed by the region’s most talented musicians and performers, as well as on-site, live painting.

Coordinated by Lace Mill resident-musician Michael Bisio, the jazz ensemble promises a concert worthy of the Ulster Performing Arts Center. Iva Bittova brings excellence of voice and violin. Anais Maviel sings as well. Ivo Perelman accompanies on tenor sax, with Michael Bisio on bass. Painter Nancy Ostrovsky will paint during the performance, inspired by onlookers and the musical experience.

Well-established reviewers have this to say about the performance line-up:

“Iva Bittova is an extraordinary artist. Raw and refined, passionate and contained, she has the soul of a gypsy, the voice of a troubadour, and the mind of a genius,” according to NPR’s All Things Considered.

Ms. Maviel, a vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, doesn’t work like a typical singer; her process is so deeply rooted as to be almost subliminal. She seems to throw herself at her notes, as if seeking a sound that might convey pure energetics,” says Giovanni Russonello, The New York Times

“Nancy Ostrovsky is a pioneer of performance painting, an art form that has not yet been embraced by galleries and museums but has earned her a dedicated following nonetheless,” Barbara Pollack writer for The New York Times, Art in America, Artnews and Time Out New York

“Ivo Perelman is perhaps the greatest musical living artist of our time,”@CriticalJazz

“The fleet-fingered and pitch-perfect Bisio ends the piece with an absolutely jaw-dropping solo,” Bill Tilland

Visitors are encouraged to contribute a $10 suggested donation. Parking is located on Manor Avenue and Progress Street. For more information, contact Michael Bisio.

Lace Mill Artists Join ArtWalk 2017

Kingston ArtWalkArtists from The Lace Mill once again join Kingston’s Art Walk on September 23 from noon to 7 p.m. and on September 24 from noon to 5 p.m. This year’s ArtWalk occupies all three Lace Mill galleries and features artists, presenters, and performers from The Lace Mill and the local community. Visual artists include: Cheryl Crispell, Teena Crispell, Christa Ermer, Friedrich Haas, Lanette Kristin Hughes, James Martin, Michele Miller, Kazuma Oshita, Marie Pierre-Paul, Rubi Rose, Gloria Rumble, Charles Steele, Joshua Stern, Patricia Tyrol, Zelda (aka Judith Z Miller), and special exhibitions by Sarah Carlson and Felix Olivieri.

Poetry and Poety Things includes work from Peter Coates, on koto, Nancy Smith, Tobias Song, Allen Stevo, Amy Westberg, and Chris Wood.

Presentations on various topics include a discussion and slide show photographic tour of Costa Rica shared by Rubi Rose; an update from Daniel Rhinier on his Forgotten Country Music archives and oral history project; The Lace Millers will belt out a favorite medley; and The Four Yorkshiremen may drop by!

On Saturday the 23rd, Music after Art Walk includes performers Sighanide, Dan Sliwa, Jeromy Davis, and Daniel Rhinier: It’s a great bunch of musicians sure to get you dancing or dreaming. or both!

Lastly, Lace Mill artist-residents Charlotte Tusch and Frank Waters host Open Studios, allowing visitors entry to their living/work spaces to see where they work, how they create, and how works progress.

Refreshments served both days. On-street parking is available. For more information, visit www.thelacemill.com and sign up for their event calendar email.

A community block party in August 2016 celebrated the opening of 55 apartments of affordable living preferenced for artists, officially anchoring the City of Kingston’s artistic community at the north end of Cornell Street. In addition to residential space, The Lace Mill shares 8,000 square feet of public gallery space as cultural activity centers open to its residents, local community and visiting public audiences. The Lace Mill has received six prestigious awards for design and historic preservation including Preservation Action’s “Best of 2016” and NYSERDA’s Trailblazer Award for housing the City’s largest solar array (160Kw). Built in 1903, The US Lace Curtain Mill boasted a long history as a major 20th-century employer and fine lace fabricator. RUPCO purchased the vacant shell, boarded up for the better part of three decades, in December 2013, setting in motion adaptive reuse of the historic building with a vision for creative placemaking. For more information, visit www.thelacemill.com.