Career Opportunity: Grant Writer/Administrator

This part time position (between 21-24 hours) will be responsible to facilitate committees, coordinate required activities leading to the annual grant submission of the HUD Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Program for Ulster County.  The position will report to and be supported by the Vice President of Housing Services.  Additionally, this position will provide grant writing support and administration for other programs as needed. 

 Position Responsibilities:

  • Facilitate and coordinate the work of the Ulster County Continuum of Care (CoC) committees and working groups.
  • Handle required activities associated with the annual grant submission to HUD’s Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Program
  • Provide monitoring of HUD funded programs
  • Assist in supporting the Coordinated Entry System data base for homeless persons.
  • Assist VP of Housing Services to prepare and submit HUD CoC annual application.
  • Responsible for documentation and recordkeeping for the Ulster County Continuum of Care

Required Knowledge, Skills, Education and Experience

  •  Strong organizational  and computer skills
  •  Grant Writing
  •  Excellent communication skills: written and oral
  • Understanding of human services and community based organizations that serve homeless
  • Ability to coordinate and engage a variety of stakeholders
  • Facilitation of meetings
  • Research skills to understand HUD Continuum of Care and other programs
  • Minutes and Recordkeeping

Please submit notice of interest for this position to kgermain@rupco.org by no later than Friday, September 14th at 12:00 pm

Annual Ulster County Continuum of Care Meeting – Update on Local Homelessness

 

Ulster County Continuum of Care logoThe Ulster County Continuum of Care is hosting its Annual Meeting on Wednesday March 21st from 1:30-3:30 at the Kirkland 2 Main Street in Kingston. This meeting is open to the public. The group works to coordinate homeless resources and identify the needs of homeless individuals and families in Ulster County. The Ulster County Continuum of Care submits an application to the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) that brings over $1 million dollars annually to Ulster County homeless providers. Funding is determined on an annual basis and all parties serving the homeless are eligible to apply. 

The group is comprised of local government; non-profits; homeless housing and service providers; local elected officials; Veteran groups; faith based; for profit and educational representatives that assist the homeless; and The Continuum welcomes new members that are interested in understanding the local homeless issues and finding creative solutions to reduce homelessness in Ulster County.

At the Annual Meeting The Continuum will review the results of our annual HUD homeless Count, discuss our Strategic Plan to reduce homelessness and introduce our Coordinated Entry System as well as fill vacancies on the Board of Directors for the Ulster County Continuum of Care.

To register to attend or for more information please contact Kathy Germain, at RUPCO (845) 331-9860 or kgermain@rupco.org. On-street or municipal parking available. 

All welcome. The Ulster County Continuum of Care represents a broad range of agencies working together to understand issues surrounding homelessness in the county with the goal of coordinating and maximizing homeless services that leads to a reduction in the number of homeless.  

This forum is open to the public; please share this post with others.
 
WHO:  Ulster County Continuum of Care (UCCofC) 
WHAT:  UCCofC Annual Meeting
WHERE:  The Kirkland, 2 Main Street, Kingston 12401

WHEN:  Wednesday March 21st, 1-3 p.m.
WHY:  To 
review the results of our annual HUD homeless Count, discuss our Strategic Plan to reduce homelessness and introduce our Coordinated Entry System as well as fill vacancies on the Board of Directors for the Ulster County Continuum of Care.
Gift to City of Kingston hits it out of the Ballpark

RUPCO Builds Community with Offer of Barmann Park Donation

Neighborhood icon Barmann Park — with its baseball field, bleachers, playground, snack bar and throngs of spectators and players — have called the intersection of Clinton and Greenkill “home base” for decades. Since 1979, the City of Kingston has foot the bill: renting the property for $1 a year, paying the property taxes, maintaining fields, and holding insurance liability season after season to keep America’s greatest sport alive in Midtown.
 
However, the City hit a home run this week, when it officially learned the new property owner, RUPCO-subsidiary Prospect & Green, LLC, will donate the recreational park with its parking, playground, and amenities to the City. “We believe that a community’s greatest asset is its people. And when people love where they live, work and play, community is present,” notes Kevin O’Connor, Chief Executive Officer at RUPCO. “We have the opportunity to ensure this neighborhood landmark remains accessible to kids, adults and families. At The Metro, we honored nickname local children have called the baseball park area for years. The community benefit this property holds – engaging residents in America’s favorite past-time now and for future generations – will flourish under the City’s ownership. Presenting this Kingston treasure to the people of this city is an honor beyond words.”
 
RUPCO acquired the baseball park as part of its purchase of the former MetLife Building of Records at 2 South Prospect Street earlier this year. The Metro brings community wealth-building to midtown Kingston as RUPCO transform the 70,000-square-foot underutilized factory/warehouse into a film & technology hub including Maker Spaces and other creative uses. RUPCO will collaborate with Stockade Works, a nonprofit specializing in media attraction, production, and training based in the Hudson Valley spearheaded by actor-producer Mary Stuart Masterson.
 
The Metro will focus on activities that create jobs while producing materials and value-added products and services within the community. Along with Stockade Works, The Metro currently hosts private, local enterprises Chronogram and Steintex. “In addition to the already significant job creation and community development that will result from the establishment of The Metro, we will now be able to preserve this beautiful and much-needed greenspace in Midtown Kingston forever,” said Mayor Steve Noble. “This is a natural transition and will expand Kingston Parks and Recreation’s already impressive inventory of community assets.”
 
The $14-million development, slated for renovation in late 2018, will generate a short-term, local economic impact during construction and long-term economic impact through job creation. The Metro was named “signature priority project” by the Mid-Hudson Regional Economic Development Council (MHREDC) in 2016 and 2017. Renovation, upgrades, and historic preservation will utilize a variety of funding sources including historic and new market tax credits. For more information, visit ww.rupco.org.
Community Partner Award: Madeline Fletcher

Every year at Community Lunch, RUPCO honors a community partner doing great work in our neighborhoods. This year, we honored Madeline Fletcher, Executive Director at Newburgh Community Land Bank for her collaborative spirit in transforming Newburgh’s historic East End. Her ability to gather partners and facilitate change has been transformative.

RUPCO Purchases Midtown Commercial Property for Community Wealth-building Development

aerial view of The Metro site mapRUPCO completed the next step in bringing community wealth-building to midtown. RUPCO closed on the former MetLife Hall of Records building last week, a 70,000-square-foot underutilized factory/warehouse at 2 South Prospect Street. RUPCO is proposing The Metro, a film & technology hub including Maker Spaces and other creative uses. Community wealth-building focuses on creating jobs while producing materials and value-added products/services within a community, instead of outsourcing those same products and sending hard-earned local dollars out of the region. RUPCO has entered a strategic partnership with Stockade Works, a nonprofit specializing in media attraction, production, and training based in the Hudson Valley and spearheaded by actor-producer Mary Stuart Masterson.

“The opportunity to once again repurpose a fallow, vacant building — this time through a community wealth-building approach to bring a mix of creative uses, all with the purpose of creating local jobs and capturing local wealth — is very exciting. This project is about creating opportunity for everyone,” says Kevin O’Connor, Chief Executive Officer at RUPCO. “The Metro is perhaps the last vacant factory building in Kingston. We’re combing our expertise in rehabilitating and managing old buildings with Stockade Works’ creative vison and drive. This is a new venture for all of us and we are not sure what the final mix of creative uses will be. The goal is to work collaboratively to build and keep the wealth, local. Already, the phone is ringing from Makers and small businesses who want to be a part of the scene at The Metro!”

Stockade Works is dedicated to fostering the further potential of film and technology in the Hudson Valley to increase economic growth and support local communities. As a driver of economic development in the region, Stockade Works attracts outside production and technology startups, connects regional media professionals, and trains the local workforce to create local crew and tech professionals. “Stockade Works is excited to partner with RUPCO to realize our vision for a community media hub to further education and innovation to ready the local workforce for jobs in film, television, and technology,” said Mary Stuart Masterson, Stockade Works Founder and Board President. “Stockade Works is dedicated to fostering the further potential of film and technology in the Hudson Valley to increase economic growth and support local communities. As a driver of economic development in the region, Stockade Works attracts outside production and technology start-ups, connects regional media professionals, and trains the local workforce to create local crew and tech professionals.”

It is our core belief that every individual should have access to fruitful economic opportunities, which includes access to well-paying jobs with avenues for growth. We believe in providing paths of entry to industries that suffer from a lack of diversity in order to transform the faces of entertainment and technology.

The $14-million development will generate a short-term, local economic impact during construction and long-term economic impact through job creation. RUPCO purchased the property with a private mortgage through the Leviticus Fund.

The Metro was named a 2016 “signature priority project” by the Mid-Hudson Regional Economic Development Council (MHREDC). Renovation, upgrades, and historic preservation will utilize a variety of funding sources including the federal dollars through New Market Tax Credits (NMTC). The project is also eligible for state and federal historic tax credits; RUPCO nominated the property for both state and federal historic registers. Empire State Development is supporting the development of The Metro with a grant of up to $1 million, which was recommended by the MHREDC in Round VI of the REDC initiative. “The Metro will be home to two of New York’s premier industries – manufacturing and film/TV,” said ESD President, CEO, and Commissioner Howard Zemsky. “This project highlights the strength and success of New York State’s community-based approach to economic development, by recognizing and responding to a growing need in the Mid-Hudson region for exactly this kind of innovative workspace. The Metro will generate local jobs for local residents and Empire State Development is proud to support this project’s growth and success.”

The Metro property includes the warehouse, parking area, and Barmann Park, which will continue serving the local community’s recreational needs. RUPCO honors the name tradition, Metro, a nickname local children have called the Barmann Park area for years. Along with Stockade Works, The Metro’s immediate tenant roll includes private, local enterprises Chronogram and Steintex.

 “My administration fought long and hard to bring the Upstate Film Tax Credit Program to Ulster County, and we have already seen tremendous results with several multi-million dollar films being shot across our county.  We are extremely excited about the future of the film industry in Ulster County and our many partners including Mary Stuart Masterson who is an integral part of this project. By locating Stockade Works at this sight, there is the potential to deliver meaningful high-quality jobs for our community, as well as industry-specific job training,” said Ulster County Executive Mike Hein.

“This is an exciting step forward for RUPCO, Stockade Works and for our community at large,” said City of Kingston Mayor Steve Noble. “This building in the heart of Midtown will no longer sit vacant. Instead, it will be bustling with innovation and purpose, empowering our local residents to access training, employment, and entrepreneurship. This isn’t just job creation, it’s community revitalization.”

10 Reasons Why Landmark Place IS Right for Kingston

Landmark Place, drone view, rendering of both buildingsBelow is our full comment provided to The Daily Freeman in response to Ward 1 Alderman Tony Davis’ statement. We list here 10 solid reasons why senior supportive housing at Landmark Place makes sense for Kingston taxpayers:

1. We’re proposing a natural re-use that restores the historic Alms House, preserving one of Kingston’s unique landmark buildings.

2. We’ve designed an attractive senior residence in a park-like setting with mature, native-inherent landscape. This design provides a quality alternative to what standard commercial development will bear. Developers we’ve contacted suggest that commercial development on that corner will need to cut down all mature trees lining Flatbush and East Chester Streets, make additional curb cuts, and bring truckloads of fill to raise up the site. Our proposal for Landmark does none of that.

As to what benefits the City of Kingston financially, we disagree with Alderman Davis’ assessment for the following reasons:
3. This site has been available since 2012. To date, no one has knocked on the County or RUPCO’s door offering any grand commercial development scheme or made any offer to buy us out.

4. Our proposal offers the City of Kingston a $20-million dollar site redevelopment that creates local construction jobs, pays professional fees, purchases materials, and supports local businesses.

5. Landmark Place creates 7.5 new, full-time-equivalent permanent jobs available in the City of Kingston.

6. Landmark Place saves taxpayer dollars now being spent on shelter, motel and expensive hospital costs. Each day, roughly 170 people receive emergency housing that costs up to $100 per night; this money comes directly from taxpayer dollars.

7. The property will be put onto the tax role for the first time in its history.

8. As a housing development, our proposal pays the City of Kingston a one-time recreation fee of $132,000. Commercial development is not required to pay that rec fee, leaving the City short $132,000. The rec fee charged to housing development is $2,000 per unit.

9. In rec fees, RUPCO paid $110,000 to the City for The Lace Mill. When you add up the rec fees we will pay for Landmark Place and Energy Square, RUPCO will pay total recreational fees of $356,000, funding the City of Kingston can surely use.

10. Lastly, Kingston hasn’t seen any new senior housing come online since 2001 while other Ulster County towns have created 469 senior units since that year. Our aging population needs dedicated senior housing for those living on modest Social Security and retirement incomes.

#BSM (Black Stories Matter)

Black Stories Matter photo collage

#BlackStoriesMatter raises our social conscience about people, perspective, and life. Spearheaded by The TMI Project, we’re honored to partner on this collaborative effort, pulling together our regional narrative to expand our understanding of each other, our differences, but most importantly, about our commonalities.

The next free workshop is:
Sunday, April 2 3-5 p.m.
The Kirkland, 2 Main Street, Kingston
Hosted by RUPCO, Citizen Action of New York and The TMI Project
RSVP online here or through the Facebook event page where you can share the event with friends, too. This workshop is free and light refreshments will be shared.

Read a few personal recollections from #BlackStoriesMatter storytellers here. Help spread the word and become a #BlackStoriesMatters partner (it’s free).

Attend the upcoming #BlackStoriesMatter performance on Saturday, March 25 at 7:30 p.m. at Pointe of Praise Church, 243 Hurley Avenue, Kingston. Admission is free but RSVP here to guarantee yourself a seat.

Write your own story! Attend the upcoming writer’s workshops or submit your story online here. We’re hosting a writing workshop in the coming months at The Kirkland. Join our mailing list to find out when the next workshop is. In the meantime, let’s talk to each other, learn about each other, help each other…let’s tell stories because our stories matter.

RUPCO recognized as one of “Preservation’s Best of 2016”

National preservation societies recognize The Lace Mill’s use of Historic Tax Credits to help revitalize the City of Kingston.

From an accomplished list of Historic Preservation Projects carried out across the United States, RUPCO’s Lace Mill has been identified as one of six historic preservation projects recognized as one of “Preservation’s Best of 2016.”

This award, granted by Preservation Action, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the National Trust Community Investment Corporation, brings attention to RUPCO’s success in using the Federal Rehabilitation Tax Credit to transform The Lace Mill, a historically significant building that was underutilized with boarded windows and turning it into a viable community asset for the 21st century. The awards are intended to bring attention to the success of the Historic Tax Credit as a driver of economic development across the country. The awards will be handed out at the Preservation’s Best Congressional Reception to be held on March 15 from 5:30 to 7:30 pm on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C. Members of the Congressional Historic Preservation Caucus as well as Preservation Action members, partners and preservationists from across the nation are expected to be in attendance.

 “Preservation Action is very pleased to host this reception and recognize these exemplary historic rehabilitation projects. At a time when the future of the Federal Rehabilitation Tax Credit is uncertain, projects like The Lace Mill in Kingston, NY help to highlight the benefits of the program,” said Robert Naylor from Preservation Action.

 “We are pleased to be singled out with just a handful of projects from around the nation as a truly transformative project that adaptively restored a historic gem into a great community asset – one that is now key to the creative placemaking magic that is occurring in midtown Kinston,” said Kevin O’Connor, RUPCO’s Chief Executive Officer. “We saw early on the potential of this boarded-up building to meet one of Kingston’s varied community needs and we are thrilled with the results.”

“Having studied architecture and urban planning, I knew at the outset, that the project would make a difference in the neighborhood,” notes Scott Dutton, the project’s architect. “However, what I completely underestimated is how much of a catalyst for neighborhood revitalization this project would become and how quickly that would happen. The number of people that have told us that they made the decision to either purchase property or establish their businesses/residences in Midtown because of what they saw happening at the Lace Mills Lofts continues to astound me.”

Preservation Action has been hosting National Historic Preservation Advocacy Week for over 30 years. By honoring exemplary rehabilitation projects, its annual reception helps to highlight the benefits of the Federal Rehabilitation Tax Credit. The HTC is the largest federal investment in historic preservation, responsible for redeveloping over 40,000 buildings, and contributing to the revitalization of cities and towns across the country. The Lace Mill investment was $18.7 million and fully one-third of the costs were paid for by private sector purchase of the Federal and New York State Historic Tax Credits. Morgan Stanley served as the investor.

RuthAnne Visnauskas, Commissioner of New York State Homes and Community Renewal, said, “HCR is proud to be part of this impressive and critically important development. The Lace Mill is once again an anchor to midtown Kingston. The preservation of this historic building will contribute to a more economically vibrant community and will provide safe, affordable housing for local artists. Under Governor Cuomo’s leadership, HCR will continue to invest in the adaptive reuse of vacant, historic buildings so that we can revitalize our neighborhoods while preserving our most significant buildings.”

RUPCO is an affordable housing advocate and innovative community developer in the Hudson Valley, is a charter member of NeighborWorks America, a national network of 245 housing and community development change agents. RUPCO affects the lives of over 8,000 people through its work with homelessness, rental assistance, foreclosure prevention, first-time homebuyers, home rehabilitation and energy efficiency and real estate development. RUPCO is currently working on $75-million worth of real estate development in the Hudson Valley, including Energy Square, Landmark Place, and The Metro in Kingston and the Newburgh Neighborhood CORe Revitalization. For more information, visit www.rupco.org

Preservation Action is a 501(c) 4 nonprofit organization created in 1974 to serve as the national grassroots lobby for historic preservation. Preservation Action seeks to make historic preservation a national priority by advocating to all branches of the federal government for sound preservation policy and programs through a grassroots constituency empowered with information and training and through direct contact with elected representatives.