First-time Homebuyer Informational Session, October 16

Ready to buy your first home, but don’t know where to start?

This in-person, hour-long First-time Homebuyer Informational Session outlines the RUPCO HomeOwnership Center’s Homebuyer Program and the path to homeownership.

Call 845-331-9860 or email dfnostrand@rupco.org to register today!

Walk-ins welcome!

Wednesday September 18, 2019 / 6-7 pm

The Kirkland, 2 Main Street, Kingston NY 12401

Sullivan County Homebuyer Seminar, October 9

Looking to purchase home in Sullivan County?

The Sullivan County Land Bank (SCLB) and RUPCO can provide Opportunities and Resources that can help!!

FREE Homebuyer Seminar in Sullivan County

Guest Speakers

* Dickie Baxter – Curasi Realty
* Karen Fitzpatrick – M&T Bank
* Sullivan County Land Bank

Call 845-331-9860 or email dfnostrand@rupco.org to register today!

First-time Homebuyer Informational Session , August 21

Ready to buy your first home, but don’t know where to start?

This in-person, hour-long First-time Homebuyer Informational Session outlines the RUPCO HomeOwnership Center’s Homebuyer Program and the path to homeownership.

Call 845-331-9860 or email dfnostrand@rupco.org to register today!

Walk-ins welcome!

Wednesday August 7,2019 / 6-7 pm                                                        

The Kirkland, 2 Main Street, Kingston NY 12401

First-time Homebuyer Informational Session, July 17

Ready to buy your first home, but don’t know where to start?

This in-person, hour-long First-time Homebuyer Informational Session outlines the RUPCO HomeOwnership Center’s Homebuyer Program and the path to homeownership.

Call 845-331-9860 or email dfnostrand@rupco.org to register today!

Walk-ins welcome!

The Kirkland, 2 Main Street, Kingston NY 12401

Flyer showing the Kirkland Building at 2 Main Street in Kingston NY and a group siting around a table for a homebuyer orientation class, promoting a firsttime homebuyer informational session on July 17, 2019 from 6-7 pm to find out how RUPCO can help firsttime homebuyers reach their goal of homeownership

 

RUPCO Home Repair Grant Informational Meeting, May 9

This public meeting will provide information on the new Ulster County Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)  that RUPCO will administer on behalf of the County of Ulster. CDBG monies will be directed to repairs to eligible owner-occupied homes in Ulster County (excluding the city of Kingston).

We will also discuss other programs if available.

Bring your questions as we will be fielding those questions after the presentation.

May 9, 2019
5:30-6:30 pm

RUPCO Kirkland Building, main floor, Senate Room
2 Main Street, Kingston NY 12401

Register online here!
or call 845-331-9860
or email dfnostrand@rupco.org to register today!

 

National Thought Leaders Join International Author at FDR Library, April 30

In the book The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, author Richard Rothstein documents how American cities became racially divided as federal, state, and local governments systematically imposed residential segregation using tactics like:
  • Undisguised racial zoning
  • Public housing that segregated previously mixed communities
  • Subsidies for builders to create white-only suburbs
Following the author’s presentation, national and regional thought leaders address the prevailing atmosphere and possible solutions to end racial inequality and poverty in housing. The panel includes:
 

Richard Rothstein is a Distinguished Fellow of the Economic Policy Institute and a Senior Fellow, emeritus, at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and of the Haas Institute at the University of California (Berkeley). He is the author of The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How our Government Segregated America (2017). The book recovers a forgotten history of how federal, state, and local policy explicitly segregated metropolitan areas nationwide, creating racially homogeneous neighborhoods in patterns that violate the Constitution and require remediation. He is also the author of Grading Education: Getting Accountability Right (2008) and Class and Schools: Using Social, Economic and Educational Reform to Close the Black-White Achievement Gap (2004).

Maurice A. Jones took the helm as the fourth President & CEO of Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) in September 2016. Immediately prior to joining LISC, he served as the secretary of commerce for the Commonwealth of Virginia, where he managed 13 state agencies focused on the economic needs in his native state. He previously served as deputy secretary for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) overseeing operations for the agency and its 8,900 staff members. Prior to that, he was commissioner of Virginia’s Department of Social Services and deputy chief of staff to former Virginia Gov. Mark Warner. Trained as an attorney, Maurice worked during the Clinton Administration on legal, policy and program issues at the Treasury Department, where he also helped manage a then-new initiative called the Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) fund—a federal program that has grown to be a critical supporter of nonprofits that leverage its capital to bolster their communities.

KT Tobin is Associate Director of the Benjamin Center for Public Policy Initiatives at SUNY New Paltz, and is focused on projects about regional issues and concerns. Prior to returning to SUNY New Paltz in 2008, she was the Assistant Director at the Marist Institute for Public Opinion. Tobin holds an M.S. in Social Research from CUNY Hunter and a Ph.D. in Sociology from SUNY Albany. Her dissertation research, titled “Gender: Impacts on Participation in Local Government,” studies elected women in the Mid-Hudson region. Tobin currently serves on the SUNY New Paltz Economic Impact research team. In the community, Tobin currently serves as Deputy Mayor of the Village of New Paltz, and served on the Village Affordable Housing Board.

Lorraine Y. Collins is Director of Public Policy and External Affairs at Enterprise Community Partners, Inc. in New York. Lorraine is responsible for working with the office’s Executive Team and Program Leaders to build and effectively execute a public-policy strategy to address affordable housing and community development issues across the New York Market. Lorraine also oversees the Office’s advocacy and lobbying activities, as well as its communications function. Prior to joining Enterprise, Lorraine spent over a decade in NYS government working on affordable housing policy at NYS Homes and Community Renewal (HCR) and the Division of Budget. Lorraine played a critical role in the State’s fair housing planning efforts by launching HCR’s Fair and Equitable Housing Office.  Additionally, at HCR Lorraine served as a Regional Director and Policy Advisor, leading efforts to address affordable housing and community development needs in areas such as health and housing, resilience, education, and employment inequalities. Lorraine also had a five-year career in the private sector, working as a financial analyst at Carrier Corporation. Lorraine received her BBA in Accounting from Howard University and her MBA and MPA from Syracuse University.

Moderator Rutledge Simmons is Executive Vice President, General Counsel/Secretary of NeighborWorks America, a national nonprofit providing technical and financial assistance to a network of community development organizations. He has served as Chair of an ABA Committee on Community Economic Development, a member of the ABA Commission on Homelessness and Poverty, and on the boards of nonprofits combating homelessness. He is interested in new ways to foster comprehensive community development via social enterprises and public/private partnerships. He is a graduate of Harvard University and Columbia Law School.  

Taller Informativo para Compradores de Vivienda en Español, Febrero 27

¿Listo para comprar su primera casa, pero no sabe por dónde empezar?

Descubra cómo los programas de RUPCO le pueden ayudar a alcanzar su objetivo de ser propietario de una vivienda.

Esta sesión informativa para compradores de vivienda primerizos describe el programa del Centro de Propiedad de Vivienda de RUPCO y el camino hacia la propiedad de su propio hogar.

¡Registrese Hoy!

¡Llame 845-331-9860 o envíe un  correo electrónico dfnostrand@rupco.org para registrarse hoy!

The Kirkland, 2 Main Street, Kingston NY 12401Volante que muestra el edificio Kirkland en 2 Main Street en Kingston NY y un grupo alrededor de una mesa para un taller informativo para compradores de vivienda, promoviendo un taller informativo para compradores de vivienda el 27 de Febrero de 2019 de 6-7 PM para averiguar cómo RUPCO puede ayudar a los compradores de vivienda primerizos alcanzar su objetivo de vivienda

 

SONYMA Contractor Breakfast – January 28, 2019

Are you a contractor looking to expand your business in 2019?

Join RUPCO and SONYMA – State of New York Mortgage Agency for a free breakfast on January 28, 2019 and find out how you can connect with new clients.

 

The Mews at Prattsville accepting applications for November 2018 move-in

Since Hurricane Irene’s record flooding in August 2011 which decimated downstream river communities throughout the region, Prattsville has been in flux, rebuilding slowly and steadily. Now, the community is finally seeing its master plan come to life. In the aftermath of the storm which washed away businesses, homes and hope in the hamlet of 700, the Town of Prattsville stood fast and conducted community planning sessions to set a vision for its future. Part of that community master plan involved the set-aside for rental housing for seniors and working families with modest incomes, The Mews at Prattsville.

Kearney Realty Group answered the call and, with funding from New York State Homes & Community Renewal, is currently constructing 45 new apartments just outside of town at 5456 Washington Street. The Mews at Prattsville offers a multigenerational housing development with 32 one-bedroom, 8 two-bedroom and 4 three-bedroom rentals available starting November 2018. Thirty-six apartments at The Mews at Prattsville (one rental is set aside for a resident superintendent) come with project-based HUD (U.S. Housing & Urban Development) rental assistance to help residents offset renting costs within this newly constructed, housing development. These apartments have a maximum household income limit of $23,650 for an individual and $27,000 for a couple. The affordable apartments without rental assistance have a maximum household income limit of $32,400 for a couple, $36,480 for three people and $40,500 for a household of four.

Your family Size              With rental assistance    Without rental Assistance               
1 person                             $23,650                               $28,230
2 person                             $27,000                               $32,400
3 person                             $30,400                               $36,480
4 person                             $33,750                               $40,500
5 person                             $36,450                               $43,740
6 person                             $39,150                               $46,980

“The Mews at Prattsville provides our aging neighbors the opportunity to live in the community they helped build,” notes Kevin O’Connor, Chief Executive Officer at RUPCO, the Hudson-Valley based community developer which will oversee the marketing, lease-up and management of The Mews post construction. “Opportunity also exists for eight families to enjoy affordable, townhome-style living in the heart of town. Prattsville is a community of opportunity. It provides opportunity for RUPCO to collaborate with Kearney Realty Group and NYS Homes & Community Renewal to bring Prattsville’s vision to fruition that in turn provides opportunity for local seniors and working families to find impeccable apartments at affordable rents right here in Greene County.” Amenities at The Mews include energy-efficient appliances, on-site superintendent, onsite laundry, activity room, playground and exercise area.

“We are proud to introduce this beautiful new affordable senior housing with eight town homes in The Town of Prattsville,” adds Ken Kearney, president of Kearny Realty & Development Group. ”This development along with the adjacent medical and community centers will provide necessary housing and services to the Prattsville area.”

NYS Homes and Community Renewal Commissioner RuthAnne Visnauskas said, “The Mews at Prattsville will provide a safe and sustainable home for seniors and families in Greene County.  As part of Governor Cuomo’s $20 billion, five-year Housing Plan, we are ensuring that all New York communities are built back stronger and more resilient by investing in affordable rental housing that will protect against severe weather.  We are excited to see applications open for The Mews at Prattsville, which will give about 100 prospective residents an opportunity to live, thrive and age in place in this new development.”

“We are accepting residential applications for the September 7th lottery. Applications received prior to September 5th will be eligible for the initial lottery but we will be accepting applications after that date,” adds Jake Michels, Director of Property Management at RUPCO. “We are eager to pre-qualify and confirm as many candidates as possible now, getting them ready to move-in quickly in November 2018. I encourage people to apply, and not to disqualify themselves prior to our review.” Applicants are encouraged to call (845) 331-2140 ext. 237 if they have questions or need a hard copy application mailed to them. Applications can also be downloaded online through www.rupco.org/the-mews or at www.NYSHousingSearch.gov

There’s no Place Like Home

Dorothy was right, there is no place like Home. For most, when you hear the word “Home” there is a strong feeling of nostalgia attached. Family is typically the main association and with that comes a sense of familiarity, security, love, trust and care.

When I think of Home, I remember baking cookies with my mom, throwing a baseball back and forth with my dad, completing homework at the kitchen  able and playing with my siblings and neighborhood friends.

When I was in school, I could not wait for the final bell to ring that meant I could go Home. Home was always the place I could be my most authentic self. At school, I was very quiet and shy. Though I was engaged in many school activities, I kept to myself and had only a few close friends. However, once Home, I had no reservations. Home was the place I felt most comfortable. If I felt excited, I could show it. If I needed to cry, I could let it out. There was no judgement or expectation behind those walls. My family and I, shared our most raw and honest versions of ourselves.

My Home was where my heart was. I carried Home with me as I formed my individuality there.

For me, my image of Home is a happy one. For others it can be a painful. But no matter the personal experience, the expectation for a Home comprises a sense of ownership, identity and self-hood. It was not until I went away to college that I realized what Home really was for me. As a teenager I craved small freedoms and new experiences; but once I received them I began to rethink what I wanted. Transitioning to a new living accommodation – a dorm suite that lacks privacy and familiarity – was especially difficult. A wonderful and trans-formative experience for many students, college living begins when you receive the keys to your “Home” on campus: a 15 x 15 space equipped with a complete stranger. Over the next nine months, I learned to make the best of my situation and space. With a roommate, you can find either a friend or a foe in your dorm room. In my college living experiences with roommates, I found that my dorm could either be a space I wanted to be in one or one I could not be away from enough. On campus, the disconnect between ‘housing’ and ‘home’ really came into focus.

I experienced homesickness to its fullest extent during my first few years of college. “Homesick” is a term many college students are accustomed to. By definition, the word homesick describes “a longing for one’s home during a period of absence from it.” With calls home to Mom and Dad, once, twice or three times a day, I counted down the days to vacation and longed for a comfortable night’s sleep in a bed that did not feel like a nail coffin.

Over time I became used to the dorm, the space, the roommates. I learned to live within those quarters without letting it take away from my overall great college experience. Nevertheless, I never considered my college room ‘Home’ because it lacked everything that made my family’s house the place I felt most comfortable, accepted and loved. I got past dorm life and now rent an apartment of my own. And, while I do love my apartment and the space and privacy it provides, it still does not have the same warmth and comfort I was lucky enough to have growing up. I understand it is a part of life to outgrow my Home, even if my family reassures me that I am always welcome to come back. The next course in life lies in finding what makes my house feel like a Home again. I know it can never the same, but I can learn to love this new place just as much. No Home is perfect, but those small fallibilities make each Home and family unit unique. At the end of the day, I see Home nurturing positive outcomes in my physical and mental health, education, employment, and relationships.

Home Matters because it is the place where I spend most of my time outside work or school. Home matters because it is the place that allows me to be the most honest version of myself. Home is where we start from. It is where we grow and thrive. But most importantly, home matters because it is the place you can be yourself with no inhibitions, to experience and share love, and be loved just for that.

Emily Humphrey is a 2018 SUNY New Paltz graduate majoring in Sociology and recently moved to a new apartment to call Home.