The Lace Mill Presents: Jazz & Poetry, October 20

Flyer for October 20 performance at 4p of 8 poets reciting the work of Gerrit Lansing; jazz bassist Michael Bisio accompaniment

Resident-artist Michael Bisio invites eight poet friends to honor fellow  poet and artist Gerrit Landsing toThe Lace Mill, 165 Cornell St., on October 20 from 4pm-6pm. in the East Gallery.

Poetry, music and storytelling fill the afternoon experience.  Come early, stay late, stroll the galleries and other offerings that day.

For more information, e-mail Michael Bisio at bisio@earthlink.net or read his artist profile page on RUPCO‘s site.

Suggested donation is $10 and covers expenses incurred by traveling artists.

Free and open to the public.

Guest parking on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street.

The Lace Mill Presents: A Jazz Experience September 22

Flyer for The Lace Mill presents: A Jazz Experience on September 22 with three established musicians

Resident-artist Michael Bisio invites fellow musicians Hui Cox and Michael Wimberly to The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell St., on September 22 from 4pm-6pm. Experience “Live Jazz” in an intimate setting,  an added bonus to ArtWalk Kingston. Come early, stay late, stroll the galleries and open studio.

For more information, e-mail Michael Bisio at bisio@earthlink.net or read his artist profile page on RUPCO‘s site.

Suggested donation is $10 and covers expenses incurred by traveling artists.

Free and open to the public.

Guest parking on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street.

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Zelda’s Interactive Art Happening, September 22

Zelda (aka Judith Z. Miller) Lace Mill artist-resident Zelda (aka Judith Z. Miller) hosts a special event on September 22  from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.  Zelda’s Interactive Art Happening celebrates spiritual connection through the Body will be held in her home/studio 165 Cornell Street, #204 Kingston.  Guests will enjoy live percussion, black-light body-painting, dancing, refreshments, and the opportunity to view ZELDA’S collage ‘My G-d’ under black light. ZELDA’s apartment is lovingly transformed into a shamanic healing space with hand-carved trees flying in mid-air from the vaulted ceilings surrounded by photographs of nature, spiritual self-portraits, collages, and mannequins decorated with healing amulets.

This performance is in addition to Zelda’s Open Studio, which is part of Artwalk Kingston’s citywide weekend gallery openings. 

Guest percussionists Bobby Sabella and Bryan Henry perform as the duo Mianbe. Bobby is a studio/live performer who has been on the scene for 35 years working with the likes of John Patitucci, (Chick Corea), Bob Mayo (Peter Frampton),T ony Purrone (The Heath Brothers), Hugh McDonald (Bon Jovi) Andy Snitzer (The Rolling Stones), and Chip Taylor (Wild Thing, Angel of the Morning).  

Body-painters include Rut Flores, a native from Argentina who holds a Master Degree in Architecture from Buenos Aires and a Fine Arts Degree from Madrid, Spain; SNOWBANKS a Brooklyn-based artist who works on both on-canvas and on-bodies and sees the body as a fluid canvas, and Tania Trowbridge, who is fascinated with the beauty in nature, photography, and the dynamics of the human form. Tania is a professional Tattoo Artist/owner of Metamorphosis Tattoo in Kingston. Other artists to be announced.

The public is invited to bring something to share — a poem, a story, a dance, instruments, food/drinks and camera to document the body-painting process. 

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
On-treeet parking on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street
Adults only (21+)
No dogs allowed

Zelda (aka Judith Z. Miller) headshotArtist Bio: Zelda (aka Judith Z. Miller) is a multifaceted artis/producer who lives in an erotic, musical, spiritual universe. As a feminist Jew who studies shamanism, she is inspired by the beauty of nature and the guiding force of her intuition as she explores the themes of connection to the Earth, spirituality, sexuality and gender. She sculpts, draws, writes, performs, photographs, and is an ecstatic dancer/percussionist/healer. Zelda co-founded The Fine Line Actors Theatre in Washington DC and performed at such venues as Source, GALA Hispanic Theatre and the Kennedy Center in DC, in NYC at WOW Café Theatre and Dixon Place, at the Lace Mill and with the TMI Project in Kingston. Currently Zelda is developing Que Será, Será (Whatever Will Be, Will Be), a multi-media one-person show that chronicles the joys and challenges of navigating non-binary Queerness from a childhood in the 1950s to adulthood.  She published in Inside Arts magazine, The Washington Post, and American Theatre magazine. Zelda currently resides at the Lace Mill artist residence in Kingston NY with her Great Dane “Z”.

TMI Project True Storytelling Performance at Lace Mill, August 15

announcement for TMI Project Storytelling August 15, 2018RUPCO hosts its second true storytelling performance with the TMI Project on Wednesday, August 15 from 7 to 9 p.m. in The Lace Mill East Gallery, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston. 

Eight Lace Mill residents will share their personal journeys of discovery in this highly intimate exchange. Bring a friend and enjoy an evening of personal transformation through the medium of storytelling.

To view the November 2017 stories shared, click here. 

This event is free and open to the public.  Light refreshments will be served. Off-street parking is available on Prospect Street and South Manor Avenue.  Freewill donations support  The Lace Mill’s three galleries, artist receptions and public showings year-round. 

Lace Mill resident-artists host 8th Annual Bon-Odori Dance Festival For Peace, August 4

Bon Odori dancers, Japan Festival for Peace, AUgust 4, 2018The 8th Annual Bon-Odori Dance Festival For Peace takes place at Kingston Point Beach on Saturday, August 4 from noon to 8 p.m. at Kingston Point Beach. This Japanese festival tradition observes “Obon” from August 13-15, the Buddhist ritual of remembering and reconnecting with ancestors and family. Around that time, community members throughout Japan get together to celebrate “Obon” by dancing “Bon-Odori” together.

Youko Yamamoto, former owner of the authentic Japanese noodle restaurant, Gomen-Kudasai Noodle Escape in New Paltz and proprietor of soon to open Ramen Noodle shop in Kingston, started this traditional summer event in the Hudson Valley after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami resulted in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant meltdown on March 11, 2011. She believes that similar disasters can happen anywhere, any day, and that nuclear energy is the most destructive creation in human history and that today radiation is the greatest threat to our daily lives. After the Fukushima meltdown, Yamamoto decided to start raising awareness of the dangers of radiation. Her unique idea was to popularize the peace movement as an entertaining dance event to make it easier to learn about the kind of harm that radiation can cause, why nuclear bombs should be banned, and what we can do to take a step toward a Nuclear-Free-Future.

Livia and Bill Vanaver, directors of the Vanaver Caravan Dance Company, believe that by dancing together we can provide communities with an opportunity and the energy to unite and set a life goal to build a peaceful future for generations to come. Yamamoto and the Vanavers encourage people to learn about alternative energies, moderate energy consumption, green lifestyles and different cultures as the first step towards this universal goal. A “Let’s talk” discussion table focuses on “Waste” along with community engagement in dance.

Bon-Odori Dance Festival For Peace  is a full day of family fun, including great food, amazing bands and world dancers, local vendors/exhibitors, and learning Japanese culture and history. All will enjoy the “Bon-Odori” dance at 6:30 PM. The Minbuza Japanese Folk Dance Company from NYC and Stuart Paton, Taiko drummer from Burlington Taiko, will lead the dance. A Jodoshinshu Buddhist monk, Kenjitsu Nakagaki, will conduct a special ritual to pray for the victims of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, as well as the victims of the Fukushima disaster, to complete the event.

INTERESTED IN BECOMING A VENDOR OR SPONSOR? Any earth-conscious vendors and sponsors are all invited! Ask for your registration form by e-mailing Youko at gomenkudasainy@gmail.comFor updates, visit their Facebook Page, BonOdoriKingston

A Two-Woman Show, August 4-29 at The Lace Mill

Lace Mill resident-artist Lannette Kristin Hughes and  local artist Nikki Pison team up for “A Two-Woman Show,” a large-format, collaborative painting exhibition gracing all four public community spaces (West, East, Mezzanine and Main galleries).  Pison’s show, “Circus Arcanus (Mysterious Circle),” includes a collection of mixed media paintings, photography, and sculpture. Hughes hangs over 20 of her large-format canvas in her show, “O’ Merciful Humanity, Where Are You Going?”

The public is invited to the opening  artists’ reception on Saturday, August 4 from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. with refreshments, music, and poetry. Musical guests Michael Bisio and Adam Siegel along with poetry by Nancy Smith round out the First Saturday event. 

Resident-artist Lanette Kristin Hughes will donate 75% of each painting purchase to RUPCO and its work with homeless communities.  She did the same with proceeds from her November 2017 show; RUPCO in turn donated to The Lace Mill Arts Council for future gallery events and artists’ shows.

Gallery hours are Wednesday and Saturday from noon to 4 p.m. or by appointment in August. Call (845) 532-3538 for more information. On-street parking is available along Prospect Street and South Manor Avenue. The Lace Mill is located at 165 Cornell Street, Kingston, NY. 

ABOUT THE ARTIST LANETTE KRISTIN HUGHES: Read her story here. 

ABOUT THE ARTIST NIKKI PISON: Nikki Pison is a visionary artist from Rosendale, NY. Home grown in the Hudson Valley, Pison is a world traveler who has always been drawn to study other cultures and mystical philosophies. As a clinical psychologist, Dr. Pison has always been fascinated by the subconscious world and the archetypal imagery that threads across cultures, linking humanity. Her mixed media paintings represent fantastical depictions of surreal landscapes, potent with evocative portraits and layered symbolism.

A Midsummer Night’s Art Show at The Lace Mill, July 7-28

flyer for Midsummer NIght's Art ShowFirst Saturday at The Lace Mill Arts presents A Midsummer Night’s Art Show, curated by James Martin, with an opening reception on July 7 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The show runs through July 28 in The Lace Mill West, East, and Main galleries. Come celebrate 3 years since artists began moving into The Lace Mill. Twenty-one great local artists — including Daniel Cardenas, Cheryl Chrispell, Chelsea Culpepper, Faya DeNitto, Ron DeNitto, Chris Gonyea, Lanette Kristin Hughes, Aaron Lockhart, James Martin, Star Nigro, Felix Olivieri, Katie Olson, Naoko Oshima, Kazuma Oshita, Autumn Pond, Rubi Rose, Susan Silverman, Charles Steele, Pablo Shine, Charlotte Tusch, and Fred Woller – share their work under a waning midsummer night’s crescent moon.

Live music and excellent gourmet food and drink for all guests prepared by culinary expert Joseph Fitzgerald and Japanese cuisine by chef Youko Yamamoto. In the Main Gallery back studio, experience Tanabata Japanese paper folding to support the Bon-Odori Festival in August. Stop in for great art, great music, and great food! Donations accepted at the door to cover show and artist travel expenses. Free parking on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street. Regular gallery times Wednesday and Saturday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

For more information, call (347) 387-6874.

“Sowing Seeds” Art Exhibit hosted by Seed Song Farm at The Lace Mill

An art exhibition “Sowing Seeds: Cultivating Art & Agriculture,” hosted by Seed Song Farm, will take place at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell St, Kingston from March 3-31, 2018. Teaching Art with Families on Saturday, March 10 from 11-12:30pm will be led by A. Kaminski and costs $15. A workshop led by Star Nigro titled, “ECO-Card Art” on March 24 from 11-1pm will delight all ages. Costs is $10; please RSVP to reserve a spot. A free closing reception is on Saturday, March 31 from 4-7pm, open to all ages and includes live music, performance and bilingual social justice storytelling. The entire exhibition will feature the works of Seed Song’s CSA members Star Nigo, Andrew Kaminski, Toni Weidenbacher, Grandpa Woodstock and Philip Gurrieri.

Through photography, mixed media, painting, the fiber arts, and sculpture, these artists will share inspired works from their farm experience. The show is sponsored by CSA member/photographer Tracy Stellingwerf, and curated by farmer coZmoz jaYa and artist Star Nigro.

Come learn what being part of a CSA (Community Sustainable Agriculture) is about and meet your local farmers from Seed Song Farm & Center located in Kingston who will be present with their farm stand to share their CSA model, agro-ecologically-grown vegetables, farm products and their weekly farm pick-up program options and price ranges. They will gladly answer your questions about programs and events. Refreshments provided for free and live music will be presented by Sean Cortright and his band “The Turn-Ups,” composed of musicians from the farm community.

All ages are invited to this event and to add to the festivities attendants may enter a drawing to win a free 1- week CSA pickup. New CSA subscribers will receive a special earl-bird gift.

Free and open to the public; donations toward Seed Song Center’s community work gratefully accepted.

You’ll have the opportunity to join our CSA on the spot with the price range that suits your needs.

Free available parking on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street.

For more information, please e-mail info@seedsongfarm.org; call coZmoz jaYa at (845) 399-9388; or visit www.seedsongfarm.org

Enjoy an Afternoon of Elegance at The Lace Mill March 24

Jazz trio Kirk Knuffke, Fred Lonberg-Holm and Michael Bisio will perform at The Lace Mill East Gallery, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston on March 24 from 4pm to 6pm. Listen to expert musicians create symphony on the spot provoked by a powerful mix of talent in an all-inclusive performance. Toe-tapping and soul-stirring moments fill the Sunday afternoon impromptu jazz session.

From top reviewers:
“Knuffke’s cornet playing is (as always) flawless. He can deliver burning runs, slur and chirp notes, all with full command of his most demanding instrument.” –All About Jazz

“Try to pin Fred Longberg-Holm down and you’re liable to leave your map looking like a pincushion.” –Bill Meyer, Dusted Magazine

“…a marvously inventive bassist that seemingly has burst forth over the years as a musical trunk rather than a branch…and he taps into a virtually inexhaustive wellspring of musical ideas when he plays.”—Grego Applegate Edwards www.gapplegatemusicreview.blogspot.com

This jazz session is one of an ongoing series at The Lace Mill. Free and open to the public. A $10 suggested donation helps cover travel expenses incurred by musicians.

Use available parking on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street.

For more information, visit thelacemill.com, e-mail Michael at bisio@earthlink.net.

Tannery Brook’s Forgotten History March 3 Saturday at The Lace Mill

 Emily Vail and Jiamin Chen will show “Fragmented & Forgotten: Tracing the Tannery Brook” in The Lace Mill’s East Gallery at 165 Cornell Street, Kingston, NY. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, March 3 from 5-8 PM, as part of Kingston’s First Saturday gallery openings. The exhibit will be on display March 3 through March 25. Original maps of the Tannery Brook, paired with historic maps, images, and text, will visualize changes in and around the stream over time.

The Tannery Brook is a small stream in Kingston. The brook flows out of the Twin Ponds, travels downhill along Linderman Avenue, crosses under Washington Avenue, skirts property lines between Washington Avenue and Green Street, and then vanishes beneath the parking lot behind the Ulster County Family Court building. It makes the rest of its journey underground, in a pipe, until it meets the Esopus Creek behind Kingston Plaza.

Although the Tannery Brook has worked hard for Kingston over the centuries – including powering mills, irrigating crops, and carrying away waste – it has been increasingly fragmented and forgotten. It hasn’t been forgotten by everyone, though; it continues to make its presence known through flooding, infrastructure failure, and other damage.

The Tannery Brook is a microcosm of the ways that we perceive and manage water in cities. Its history and present state can provide context for modern stream and urban water management, as we ask: What should we expect from a stream with such a long history of use? How can this history relate to future restoration projects?

With these questions in mind, Emily Vail and Jiamin Chen trace the Tannery Brook’s history from colonial settlement in the 1650s through today using historic maps, historic images, local history narratives, newspaper articles, and other original documents.

About Emily Vail:

Emily Vail is a graduate student at Cornell University in the field of Natural Resources. Since 2010, Emily has worked at the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation’s Hudson River Estuary Program , in collaboration with the NYS Water Resources Institute at Cornell University . She supports community-based watershed groups, municipalities, and other partners as they work to improve water quality in the Hudson Valley. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies from Vassar College . Emily also organizes Uptown Swing Kingston, a monthly night of hot jazz, dance, and swing, and directs the Uptown Lowdown vintage jazz dance troupe.

 

About Jiamin Chen:

Jiamin Chen is a graduate landscape architecture student from Cornell University . Originally from Vancouver, Canada, she has a bachelor’s degree in environmental design from the University of British Columbia . She worked as a landscape designer on various municipal and governmental projects across many parts of Asia including China, Malaysia, Qatar and Myanmar. She returned to graduate school in pursuit of professional licensure, and her work as a graduate research assistant has taken her to various parts of upstate New York and this year, to Kingston. In her spare time, she is a passionate botanical artist, a houseplant collector and an avid traveler.

This work is supported by the NYS Water Resources Institute at Cornell University and the Hudson River Estuary Program of the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation , with support from the NYS Environmental Protection Fund .

For more information, contact Emily Vail at eev22@cornell.edu .

ABOUT THE LACE MILL : A community block party in August 2016 celebrated the opening of 55 apartments of affordable living preferenced for artists, officially anchoring the City of Kingston’s artistic community at the north end of Cornell Street. In addition to residential space, The Lace Mill shares 8,000 square feet of public gallery space as cultural activity centers open to its residents, local community and visiting public audiences. The Lace Mill has received six prestigious awards for design and historic preservation including Preservation Action’s “Best of 2016” and NYSERDA’s Trailblazer Award for housing the City’s largest solar array (160Kw). Built in 1903, The US Lace Curtain Mill boasted a long history as a major 20th-century employer and fine lace fabricator. RUPCO purchased the vacant shell, boarded up for the better part of three decades, in December 2013, setting in motion adaptive reuse of the historic building with a vision for creative placemaking. For more information, visit www.thelacemill.com .

ABOUT RUPCO : RUPCO, affordable housing advocate and innovative community developer in the Hudson Valley, is a charter member of NeighborWorks America, a national network of 245 housing and community development change agents. RUPCO affects the lives of over 8,000 people through its work with homelessness, rental assistance, foreclosure prevention, first-time homebuyers, home rehabilitation, energy efficiency and real estate development. RUPCO connects nearly 2000 families, over 800 landlords and rental assistance through the NYS Home and Community Renewal and Housing Choice Voucher Program. RUPCO currently owns/manages 16 properties with 411 apartments providing homes to over 560 people. The majority of those residents represent our community’s most vulnerable populations: the elderly, seniors, disabled and working class families. RUPCO is also improving local communities through estate development in the Hudson Valley including The Metro, Energy Square, Landmark Place (all in Kingston) and Newburgh’s Historic East End. For more information, visit www.rupco.org.