The Lace Mill Presents: Jazz & Poetry, October 20

Flyer for October 20 performance at 4p of 8 poets reciting the work of Gerrit Lansing; jazz bassist Michael Bisio accompaniment

Resident-artist Michael Bisio invites eight poet friends to honor fellow  poet and artist Gerrit Landsing toThe Lace Mill, 165 Cornell St., on October 20 from 4pm-6pm. in the East Gallery.

Poetry, music and storytelling fill the afternoon experience.  Come early, stay late, stroll the galleries and other offerings that day.

For more information, e-mail Michael Bisio at bisio@earthlink.net or read his artist profile page on RUPCO‘s site.

Suggested donation is $10 and covers expenses incurred by traveling artists.

Free and open to the public.

Guest parking on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street.

The Lace Mill Presents: A Jazz Experience September 22

Flyer for The Lace Mill presents: A Jazz Experience on September 22 with three established musicians

Resident-artist Michael Bisio invites fellow musicians Hui Cox and Michael Wimberly to The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell St., on September 22 from 4pm-6pm. Experience “Live Jazz” in an intimate setting,  an added bonus to ArtWalk Kingston. Come early, stay late, stroll the galleries and open studio.

For more information, e-mail Michael Bisio at bisio@earthlink.net or read his artist profile page on RUPCO‘s site.

Suggested donation is $10 and covers expenses incurred by traveling artists.

Free and open to the public.

Guest parking on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Zelda’s Interactive Art Happening, September 22

Zelda (aka Judith Z. Miller) Lace Mill artist-resident Zelda (aka Judith Z. Miller) hosts a special event on September 22  from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.  Zelda’s Interactive Art Happening celebrates spiritual connection through the Body will be held in her home/studio 165 Cornell Street, #204 Kingston.  Guests will enjoy live percussion, black-light body-painting, dancing, refreshments, and the opportunity to view ZELDA’S collage ‘My G-d’ under black light. ZELDA’s apartment is lovingly transformed into a shamanic healing space with hand-carved trees flying in mid-air from the vaulted ceilings surrounded by photographs of nature, spiritual self-portraits, collages, and mannequins decorated with healing amulets.

This performance is in addition to Zelda’s Open Studio, which is part of Artwalk Kingston’s citywide weekend gallery openings. 

Guest percussionists Bobby Sabella and Bryan Henry perform as the duo Mianbe. Bobby is a studio/live performer who has been on the scene for 35 years working with the likes of John Patitucci, (Chick Corea), Bob Mayo (Peter Frampton),T ony Purrone (The Heath Brothers), Hugh McDonald (Bon Jovi) Andy Snitzer (The Rolling Stones), and Chip Taylor (Wild Thing, Angel of the Morning).  

Body-painters include Rut Flores, a native from Argentina who holds a Master Degree in Architecture from Buenos Aires and a Fine Arts Degree from Madrid, Spain; SNOWBANKS a Brooklyn-based artist who works on both on-canvas and on-bodies and sees the body as a fluid canvas, and Tania Trowbridge, who is fascinated with the beauty in nature, photography, and the dynamics of the human form. Tania is a professional Tattoo Artist/owner of Metamorphosis Tattoo in Kingston. Other artists to be announced.

The public is invited to bring something to share — a poem, a story, a dance, instruments, food/drinks and camera to document the body-painting process. 

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
On-treeet parking on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street
Adults only (21+)
No dogs allowed

Zelda (aka Judith Z. Miller) headshotArtist Bio: Zelda (aka Judith Z. Miller) is a multifaceted artis/producer who lives in an erotic, musical, spiritual universe. As a feminist Jew who studies shamanism, she is inspired by the beauty of nature and the guiding force of her intuition as she explores the themes of connection to the Earth, spirituality, sexuality and gender. She sculpts, draws, writes, performs, photographs, and is an ecstatic dancer/percussionist/healer. Zelda co-founded The Fine Line Actors Theatre in Washington DC and performed at such venues as Source, GALA Hispanic Theatre and the Kennedy Center in DC, in NYC at WOW Café Theatre and Dixon Place, at the Lace Mill and with the TMI Project in Kingston. Currently Zelda is developing Que Será, Será (Whatever Will Be, Will Be), a multi-media one-person show that chronicles the joys and challenges of navigating non-binary Queerness from a childhood in the 1950s to adulthood.  She published in Inside Arts magazine, The Washington Post, and American Theatre magazine. Zelda currently resides at the Lace Mill artist residence in Kingston NY with her Great Dane “Z”.

A Two-Woman Show, August 4-29 at The Lace Mill

Lace Mill resident-artist Lannette Kristin Hughes and  local artist Nikki Pison team up for “A Two-Woman Show,” a large-format, collaborative painting exhibition gracing all four public community spaces (West, East, Mezzanine and Main galleries).  Pison’s show, “Circus Arcanus (Mysterious Circle),” includes a collection of mixed media paintings, photography, and sculpture. Hughes hangs over 20 of her large-format canvas in her show, “O’ Merciful Humanity, Where Are You Going?”

The public is invited to the opening  artists’ reception on Saturday, August 4 from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. with refreshments, music, and poetry. Musical guests Michael Bisio and Adam Siegel along with poetry by Nancy Smith round out the First Saturday event. 

Resident-artist Lanette Kristin Hughes will donate 75% of each painting purchase to RUPCO and its work with homeless communities.  She did the same with proceeds from her November 2017 show; RUPCO in turn donated to The Lace Mill Arts Council for future gallery events and artists’ shows.

Gallery hours are Wednesday and Saturday from noon to 4 p.m. or by appointment in August. Call (845) 532-3538 for more information. On-street parking is available along Prospect Street and South Manor Avenue. The Lace Mill is located at 165 Cornell Street, Kingston, NY. 

ABOUT THE ARTIST LANETTE KRISTIN HUGHES: Read her story here. 

ABOUT THE ARTIST NIKKI PISON: Nikki Pison is a visionary artist from Rosendale, NY. Home grown in the Hudson Valley, Pison is a world traveler who has always been drawn to study other cultures and mystical philosophies. As a clinical psychologist, Dr. Pison has always been fascinated by the subconscious world and the archetypal imagery that threads across cultures, linking humanity. Her mixed media paintings represent fantastical depictions of surreal landscapes, potent with evocative portraits and layered symbolism.

A Midsummer Night’s Art Show at The Lace Mill, July 7-28

flyer for Midsummer NIght's Art ShowFirst Saturday at The Lace Mill Arts presents A Midsummer Night’s Art Show, curated by James Martin, with an opening reception on July 7 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The show runs through July 28 in The Lace Mill West, East, and Main galleries. Come celebrate 3 years since artists began moving into The Lace Mill. Twenty-one great local artists — including Daniel Cardenas, Cheryl Chrispell, Chelsea Culpepper, Faya DeNitto, Ron DeNitto, Chris Gonyea, Lanette Kristin Hughes, Aaron Lockhart, James Martin, Star Nigro, Felix Olivieri, Katie Olson, Naoko Oshima, Kazuma Oshita, Autumn Pond, Rubi Rose, Susan Silverman, Charles Steele, Pablo Shine, Charlotte Tusch, and Fred Woller – share their work under a waning midsummer night’s crescent moon.

Live music and excellent gourmet food and drink for all guests prepared by culinary expert Joseph Fitzgerald and Japanese cuisine by chef Youko Yamamoto. In the Main Gallery back studio, experience Tanabata Japanese paper folding to support the Bon-Odori Festival in August. Stop in for great art, great music, and great food! Donations accepted at the door to cover show and artist travel expenses. Free parking on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street. Regular gallery times Wednesday and Saturday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

For more information, call (347) 387-6874.

Que Será, Será (Whatever Will Be, Will Be)” At The Lace Mill
 

Lace Mill resident artist Zelda (aka Judith Z. Miller) presents “Que Será, Será (Whatever Will Be, Will Be),” A Life Journey: My Experience of Sexual Orientation & Gender Expression. This talk and slide presentation, (a work in progress), chronicles the joys and challenges of navigating non-binary Queerness from childhood in the 1950’s to adulthood. The 30-minute presentation will be at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street, Wednesdays at 5:30 pm and Saturdays at 1 & 2 pm through the month of April at the Lace Mill. The presentation is part of and in response to the MEN show currently at the Lace Mill.

Zelda talks about her inspiration to create the presentation: “I knew I had to participate in the MEN show to share my own life story to turn those quintessential/iconic male and limiting images upside down!”
 
At the opening of “Que Será, Será (Whatever Will Be, Will Be),” Kevin O’Connor, RUPCO’s CEO, who also attended the TMI workshop performance sponsored by RUPCO at the Lace Mill, remarked: “I just think that there are going to be people in the audience who are going to hear themselves and see themselves in your story — and I just encourage you to keep going.”
 
 Presentation Dates: Wednesdays, April 11, 18, 25 at 5:30 pm; Saturdays, April 14, 21, 28 at 1 & 2 pm
 
Free and open to the public.
 
Donations are accepted to support recovery efforts in Puerto Rico:
 
 
Free available parking located on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street.
 
For more information, visit https://bit.ly/2HnDEGi
The Lace Mill Presents 1st Saturday Art Exhibit MEN: A Men’s Art Show

Men: A Men’s Art Show opens Saturday, April 7 with an opening reception from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. at The Lace Mill Main and West Galleries. Displayed paintings and sculptures are designed to present a positive side of the often chided gender. In a time when bad men are rightfully exposed left and right for their unspeakable behaviors, innocent men are callously being thrown into the mix. The rest of men are advised to stay quiet and listen. A group of 11 local male and female artists decided to have a men’s show in response to the silence and stigmatization. Related statements from each artist will accompany the visual art.

MEN: A Men’s Art Show curated by Lace Mill resident-artist James Martin will feature works from artists Zelda aka Judith Z. miller, Les Castellanos, Chris Seubert, Marie Mastronardo, Lanette Kristin Hughes, Naoko Oshima, Steve Mulvey, Rubi Rose, Charles Steele, Autumn Pond, and Fred Woller with music by The Turn Ups.

Men: A Men’s Show will run from April 7 through April 27 in the West and Main Galleries. Gallery hours are Wednesdays and Saturdays, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.and are located at The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell Street in Kingston.

Free and open to the public. Freewill donations graciously accepted and benefit The Lace Mill Arts Council. All artwork is available for purchase. Guest parking available on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street. For more information, contact James Martin tcfishingcompany@aol.com

Hope Through Activism: Lanette Hughes Inspires Through Artwork

Standing outside The Lace Mill, wearing over-sized black sunglasses, talking to a neighbor, Lanette Hughes appears nondescript. A cordial, “Hi, how are you?” to a stranger, she resumes her conversation. You would never guess she churned her tragedy into art in a profound way. A first-hand experience with domestic violence, her identity stolen and her savings robbed from her, these life-lesson setbacks made her willpower stronger. Lanette Hughes is not only a survivor, but a thriver — and her artwork embodies her understated vigor.

Hughe’s parents introduced her to situations at an early age that called for toughening up. They lived in Europe withinin target sites of WWII battle and concentration camp zones. While transitioning between countries, she found it difficult to reconcile that she had friends from opposing countries post-wartime. Her parent’s trip to Dachau further fragmented her sense of peace. The air-raid rubble and abandoned buildings that littered some streets haunted her as a child, a terror still raw when she thinks back.

Recently, Hughes channeled that experience into her artwork, “Human Beings are Not Created for Target Practice.” The large canvas oil painting highlights military personnel . If stripped of their uniforms, would they have reason to shoot the enemy? Hughes bears no bias towards “good” and “bad” sides where nationalism incurs.

She is, however, partial to beautiful art. While living in Germany, Hughes remembers trekking down to monasteries and playing nearby. One day while climbing a wall enclosure surrounding St. Michaelsberg, she fell and hurt herself. Monks brought her in, and she was introduced to wondrous sculpture and paintings within. Inspired, she asked her parents to hire a governess educate her in classical art training and illumination found in religious texts.

Being a sensitive artist and a newcomer whenever her parents moved, she stood out from the crowd. Coming to the United States, she was sorely misunderstood for her European values and mannerisms. She was often bullied and put down, and over time, these experiences impacted her artwork.

She was a target again a few years back, after she returned from a trip to Florida to find her identity stolen. Her home, savings, and future fell through her hands. Hughes became homeless, living out of her car, where she slept and traveled for weeks in Woodstock. She refused to give up her dog when Social Services prompted her to do so, so she could receive a no-pets hotel room. Deprived of everything else, she wasn’t relinquishing her four-footed companion.

Hughes kept her spirits up and applied to housing assistance programs in the local area that would allow dogs. At the time, RUPCO was accepting applications for The Lace Mill for artists. She applied to the lottery  and the patterns of the universe aligned with her needs. “In the miracle of miracles, I got RUPCO housing. And I love it here—every day I thank my creator for this fabulous place and all the friends I have made.”

Hughes realizes that others don’t have it as good. At her last exhibition, held at The Lace Mill in October 2017, Hughes combined her activism with her art show, and made a stand for something larger than making money. She created 50 pieces for sale, where 75% of proceeds benefited local charities. One of her paintings benefited the Haitian People’s Project to provide meals for afflicted families. Consistently without food, Haitian parents often feed their children “mud cakes.” These look like pies, but made of mud, and eating them causes malnutrition and infection. Hughes wants to help in her way, through her art and social activism.

Hughes is proud to live in an apartment where she knows her efforts are supported. She’s made many connections to Kingston nonprofits and continues to support human rights in the way she knows best. Her influence has already been felt among the community; one man started to cry when he saw one of her paintings regarding domestic violence. “’This happened to me, and I’ve never told anybody,’” Hughes recalls. “It really touched him. He didn’t say whether it happened to him, his mother, wife or girlfriend, but it happened to him somehow.”

Her paintings possess an understated emotional impact. She doesn’t wish people to turn aghast, but she wants her visual to resonate with them. She wants people to know that there is awareness, that others have been through similar situations, and the often misunderstood pain — maybe portrayed as endless swirls or spirals in her abstract work — is normal and valid. She connects to her audience on a personal level. “I don’t like the word authentic, but I try to be sincere about who I am. I’ve been through things and I try to relate that to other people.”

Maybe malnutrition, abuse, or trauma has robbed a person of identity, and they use public facades to hide the pain. By recognizing themselves in her work, a part of them is resurrected and recognized. Maybe it will take years to fix, with in-between years of denial. But something clicked, and that is what activism is all about.

Hughes has changed her perspective on earning a living and being an artist. “I don’t need as much as I thought I needed to make me happy. I’m happy with or without. But the fact that I can paint whatever I want is an incredible blessing. And because I live here, I can do that.”