A Midsummer Night’s Art Show at The Lace Mill, July 7-28

flyer for Midsummer NIght's Art ShowFirst Saturday at The Lace Mill Arts presents A Midsummer Night’s Art Show, curated by James Martin, with an opening reception on July 7 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The show runs through July 28 in The Lace Mill West, East, and Main galleries. Come celebrate 3 years since artists began moving into The Lace Mill. Twenty-one great local artists — including Daniel Cardenas, Cheryl Chrispell, Chelsea Culpepper, Faya DeNitto, Ron DeNitto, Chris Gonyea, Lanette Kristin Hughes, Aaron Lockhart, James Martin, Star Nigro, Felix Olivieri, Katie Olson, Naoko Oshima, Kazuma Oshita, Autumn Pond, Rubi Rose, Susan Silverman, Charles Steele, Pablo Shine, Charlotte Tusch, and Fred Woller – share their work under a waning midsummer night’s crescent moon.

Live music and excellent gourmet food and drink for all guests prepared by culinary expert Joseph Fitzgerald and Japanese cuisine by chef Youko Yamamoto. In the Main Gallery back studio, experience Tanabata Japanese paper folding to support the Bon-Odori Festival in August. Stop in for great art, great music, and great food! Donations accepted at the door to cover show and artist travel expenses. Free parking on South Manor Avenue and Prospect Street. Regular gallery times Wednesday and Saturday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

For more information, call (347) 387-6874.

Michael Bisio Hits the Right Note in Home-Life Symphony

Michael Bisio holding bass black and white headshotMichael Bisio is an accomplished bassist player, music connoisseur, and long-time adjunct professor. Bisio also moved around many times, from Washington State to NYC, adding to his repertoire of cultural experiences.  He found stability at The Lace Mill in Kingston, where he lives with his wife and fellow artist Dawn Bisio.  Their apartment is his happy place with wiggle room to jive in and hang prized artwork hanging. Now, he can balance professorship, musical gigs, traveling, and love—a harmony he’d sought for years.

Bisio was a reserved student in college, shy and unassuming. Professors took note of his talent and realized self-confidence was holding him back from excelling. They routinely pushed him to step outside of his comfort zone in his work, to self-reflect on the success he wanted. They challenged him to see his potential, flaws included, modeling a budding artist into a star performer. For him, it was tough—to stand in front of sheet music and critics for hours a day. By graduation, he collected his degree and the payoff of a sharper sense of confidence.

Years later, married with a son, Bisio owned a home in Seattle. After experiencing a “high point” in home life, he divorced and moved cross-country for his musical career. He came to NYC, hopping from apartment to apartment for about a decade until he heard about The Lace Mill through a friend. He applied, and a “fantastic” opportunity unfolded for his music, housing and finding the love of his life next door. Dawn and Michael met passing through the door of ASK Gallery in Kingston—Dawn caught Michael’s eye. He flirted with a coy “you’re hot.” Dawn reciprocated, and the two instantly bonded. They soon moved in together and made their own hub for artsy exploration.

Now, Bisio is part of a large pool of artists who help each other out with events hosted at The Lace Mill. He’s glad he is in the mix, but with enough privacy to focus on his ever-evolving career. “I think in the abstract, it created a community that in the long run has proven to be diverse. It [The Lace Mill] gives me a platform to produce concerts, which benefits the community.” Artist-residents attend his concerts and they bring friends. Word of mouth spreads concert details quickly around town. Engaged audience members are key in these live concerts; they are an important “ingredient in the process” and contribute vibes—either high or low frequency—that Bisio feeds off for a unique emotive atmosphere. Live performance, he recognizes, is a special relationship between performer and audience. If the audience doesn’t understand the tradition behind the musical number, “they can still feel it—the overwhelming intensity of it.”

Bisio isn’t going to halt the torrent of gigs soon. He plans on affecting more people through his bassist work as long as he “remains creative and positive.” There’s always more good energy to create in the universe, and he feels it is his responsibility to contribute high-frequency vibrations that align people’s energies into a state of bliss. And after the shows are over, he comes home to his apartment, to relax and rejuvenate as he pleases. Indeed, his sacred space couldn’t be more loving and personal, a place which can be completely silent or filled with music, whichever, and whenever, he prefers. His home is where he can fluctuate between living and prepping for a show, balancing out the dynamics of being and doing, in symphony with his life partner.

Michael’s next Lace Mill concert is Saturday, April 21, from 4-6pm in the East Gallery of The Lace Mill, 165 Cornell St, Kingston. Suggested donation is $10.00. Guest parking is available on South Prospect Street and Manor Avenue. For more information, e-mail Michael at [email protected] or visit MichaelBisio.com.

Check out Bisio’s photo feature on the American Express site: https://www.amexessentials.com/hudson-valley-guide/ Click “Start Slideshow and scroll to image #7.

Enjoy an Afternoon of Elegance at The Lace Mill March 24

Jazz trio Kirk Knuffke, Fred Lonberg-Holm and Michael Bisio will perform at The Lace Mill East Gallery, 165 Cornell Street, Kingston on March 24 from 4pm to 6pm. Listen to expert musicians create symphony on the spot provoked by a powerful mix of talent in an all-inclusive performance. Toe-tapping and soul-stirring moments fill the Sunday afternoon impromptu jazz session.

From top reviewers:
“Knuffke’s cornet playing is (as always) flawless. He can deliver burning runs, slur and chirp notes, all with full command of his most demanding instrument.” –All About Jazz

“Try to pin Fred Longberg-Holm down and you’re liable to leave your map looking like a pincushion.” –Bill Meyer, Dusted Magazine

“…a marvously inventive bassist that seemingly has burst forth over the years as a musical trunk rather than a branch…and he taps into a virtually inexhaustive wellspring of musical ideas when he plays.”—Grego Applegate Edwards www.gapplegatemusicreview.blogspot.com

This jazz session is one of an ongoing series at The Lace Mill. Free and open to the public. A $10 suggested donation helps cover travel expenses incurred by musicians.

Use available parking on South Manor Avenue and Progress Street.

For more information, visit thelacemill.com, e-mail Michael at [email protected]